jgbrown

You know someone really screwed up when...

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A diesel tank drains down to half full and fills the bilge after being filled up.  Pics to follow in a bit.  Definitely a WTF moment.   Amazing how people can install things in boats without at least looking to see what they're going to drill into first.

The culprit is a screw through a bulkhead the tank is secured to, looks like it got used to mount a settee frame.  On the bright side the owner saved 500$ off our price by getting his own cabinet maker to supply and install said settee frame. On the dark side there's 50 gallons of diesel in the bilge/plywood/saturating the flotation foam/leaking out the transom drain.  Most likely engine and the tank will need to be pulled and sorted out plus hours of cleanup, and I'm not sure how we'll get the smell out without tearing out the new carpet, cabinetry, etc since there is no bilge access.

:huh::wacko:

15 minutes could save you thousands... I've already taken all the employees here for a walk through as a reminder about why I'm so fussy about stopping for an inspection before the start of a job.   Easy to get blinded to surroundings until it's too late if you aren't paying attention. 

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I hope these amateurs had the sense to use stainless steel screws to secure the frame to the fuel tank.

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We had a problem with a misplaced screw on our boat too.  Builders put a screw-mounted cable tie into the inside of the hull underneath the cockpit to help keep the engine control cables & wiring out of the bilge. Nice, except that any condensation or spray that got onto the wires slid down to where the screw was and entered into the balsa core.  Twenty years later: a 30" patch of wet, some rotted & delaminated balsacore that had to be cut out & replaced.  Watch where you put those pointy things! 

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Our bank manager's engineer husband was installing a piece of gear at anchor and drilled through the hull below the waterline.

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2 hours ago, PaulK said:

We had a problem with a misplaced screw on our boat too.  Builders put a screw-mounted cable tie into the inside of the hull underneath the cockpit to help keep the engine control cables & wiring out of the bilge. Nice, except that any condensation or spray that got onto the wires slid down to where the screw was and entered into the balsa core.  Twenty years later: a 30" patch of wet, some rotted & delaminated balsacore that had to be cut out & replaced.  Watch where you put those pointy things! 

J35?  Know a boat that had the same issue, they replaced much more core though.

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 J/36.  Went at it from inside. Not only under cockpit but also beneath quarterberth that had to be opened up for access. Dremeled bigger & bigger circles until the core & laminates were dry & solid. Then filled in new.  Much easier than working on the overhead, which had issues from previous owner's cabintop gear installs.  

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16 hours ago, Hugh Jorgan said:

I hope these amateurs had the sense to use stainless steel screws to secure the frame to the fuel tank.

 

nah , the diesel will keep those sheet metal screws rust free..

 

we had a guy around here who liked to fix blisters with bondo below the waterline, he'd use steel screws inside his repairs for it to hold onto..  you could tell when the bottom needed attention when the rust stains started showing up..

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17 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Our bank manager's engineer husband was installing a piece of gear at anchor and drilled through the hull below the waterline.

A friend was given a free POS boat that was "sinking" once.  They'd screwed on a transom mounted transducer below the waterline(on a sailboat, lol) bumped it on a dock or something and it started sinking.  Two screws and a little sealant was all it took.

 

The screws are painted deck screws, the cretin built the whole thing out of mixed scraps(spruce, fir, pine) from my off cuts bin, including bits of pallet.   Well except where he brad nailed it with bright steel nails(and didn't paint anything).    The closer I look the more I am in awe of the dog fucking that was required to drag out the "work" that he did for a solid month and the balls it took to charge 3 grand for it with a straight face.   Of course he moved away halfway through the job too, shudder to think what would have happened if he'd carried on across the bulkhead installing more(twin tanks and plumbing and electrical on the back side of that bulkhead).  :blink:  Even the finished parts of a couple dinette benches he made for the same boat we had to take apart, and put them back together properly with glue, clean up the water/coffee stains, stain the rubbed through areas on the finished ply, touch up all the dings and varnish them.  

 

 

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I hope that douchebag was just an acquaintance and not an actual friend. ;)

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23 hours ago, jgbrown said:

A diesel tank drains down to half full and fills the bilge after being filled up.  Pics to follow in a bit.  Definitely a WTF moment.   Amazing how people can install things in boats without at least looking to see what they're going to drill into first.

The culprit is a screw through a bulkhead the tank is secured to, looks like it got used to mount a settee frame.  On the bright side the owner saved 500$ off our price by getting his own cabinet maker to supply and install said settee frame. On the dark side there's 50 gallons of diesel in the bilge/plywood/saturating the flotation foam/leaking out the transom drain.  Most likely engine and the tank will need to be pulled and sorted out plus hours of cleanup, and I'm not sure how we'll get the smell out without tearing out the new carpet, cabinetry, etc since there is no bilge access.

:huh::wacko:

15 minutes could save you thousands... I've already taken all the employees here for a walk through as a reminder about why I'm so fussy about stopping for an inspection before the start of a job.   Easy to get blinded to surroundings until it's too late if you aren't paying attention. 

I’ve had to clean up a boat with at least that much diesel spilled in the bilge. Twice. Not fun. 

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21 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Our bank manager's engineer husband was installing a piece of gear at anchor and drilled through the hull below the waterline.

No long after we brought our boat, some fellow at a marina we were at wondered up one day and said "I know that boat". He claimed to know it from an area at least 800 km away and quite a few years beforehand. He then proceeded to say that "So and so owned it at the time and drilled a hole through the hull when installing a new head". I had no idea who "so and so" was, but that didn't deter him from telling the story, at length, of the day this incident happened and the panic that ensued. Of course, I just nodded and smiled thinking that this guy's got the wrong boat.

Many years later, we're replacing the head. What do we find? One extremely rough smashed/cut-out section of the liner immediately under the head that appeared as if it had been done in great haste along with one very poorly filled and patched quarter inch diameter hole. The boat was on the hardstand at the time, so it was easy to confirm that the hole did, in fact, exit the outside of the hull once a bit of antifoul was ground away in the general area.

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We had some guys drill up through the deck to mount a radio bracket,  right before a long delivery. 

Right through the flexible fuel bladder sitting in the cockpit.

 

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A few years ago I was under my boat grinding out a blister and saw a dry spot so went a little bit deeper. Very quickly I had a perfectly round hole about 1/4 in diameter. Seemed odd. stuck an awl into the hole and it sunk in to the handle. 

Climbed up into the boat and started digging into lockers and found the hole on the inside. It was directly under the electrical panel and directly under a 2" hole in some horizontal plywood that a bundle of wires were passed through. Whoever cut that 2" hole in the factory didn't take the pilot bit into account. They were probably an 1/8" inch or so from drilling through the hull. Oops. 

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I hope that douchebag was just an acquaintance and not an actual friend. ;)

Didn't say I made the repair. In fairness to him the screws were probably the most sound area of the hull.  And the most expensive upgrade in at least a decade.  He sailed it for quite a while that way before 'gifting' it to someone else.  The fractures around the keel were much more concerning...

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I just drove a screw thru a 1/2" rigid copper pipe while setting the first cabinet in a complete kitchen. Hit the stud dead center, then hit a toilet supply riser that passed thru the stud 1/2" from the kitchen face, no screw plate over it.  Heard a hissing noise, started pulling out the cabinet, third screw withdrawn came with a blast of high-pressure water. Oh shit. Drove screw back in.  Found shutoff in basement, opened up wall, found punctured pipe. Hoo boy. Today just go a LOT longer.

oops.JPG.fb6c9260712a2b892017ffa866b7d18f.JPG

I hope the inventor of Shark Bites(tm) has a private island someplace, cuz he or she deserves it.

Twenty years  in the biz, I still pull dumb shit like this.

 

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No pics, but you are not alone. I was installing cabinets in our utility room. Managed to hit the copper water line in 5 places. Did not notice till later when my wife asked why there water was all over the utility room floor.  Tear out the dry wall after removing the newly installed cabinets, also had to repair the floor in the utility room and also the floor in the bathroom next door. Definitely not my first or last screw up.

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    I was part of a crew building a 65' aluminum sportfisherman in New Orleans.

    The boat had just been launched and we were finishing up the interior with the boat tied up next to the woodshop in the canal. Fairing and painting was still being done on the decks, house and cockpit. The engines had been installed and batteries were in and it was a big day when the batts were hooked up and the engines were started for the first time. That was on a Friday and a short little test run in the Lake led to a celebration after quitting time. It is a big milestone when a boat takes its first breaths and you hear those big Stuart & Stevenson Detroit 8V-92's roar into life. 

    Funny thing was about midnight that evening, the security guard had just done his last walkthrough of the yard and had retreated to his little guard shack at the gate to nap through the rest of his shift. He had just started to doze off when he heard one of the big motors crank up and settle to a steady idle. He was a Barney Fife sort of guy and got his bullet out of his shirt pocket and loaded his pistol and stepped out to the boat which was still dark. The owner of the company had a penthouse apt right next next to the boat and he thought that perhaps the big boss was showing off the new build to a buddy but not in the dark. He made a challenge to anyone who might be on board and called for backup from the NOPD USCG and lit up the yard with all the floodlights. Once the boat had been searched and swept the engine was turned off and everone calmed down and eventually left. 

     Next day the electricians and diesel mechanics ran diagnostics on everything and found nothing amiss. Everone was still puzzled but just shrugged and let it go. THEN that night at about the same time the boat cranked itself up once again! There had been a security camera re aimed from the penthouse to the boat and there was no sign of anyone going on the boat when it started up. There were big raceways running up the hullside for all the controls and wiring from the engineroom to the helm on the flybridge. The next day, we zipped off the velcroed coverpanels for the raceways in the master stateroom which was the only place that hadn't undergone scrutiny the day before. Lo and behold, there was a SS screw running through 3/4" wooden furring strips through aluminum framing that was used by us interior joiners to construct the interior. That single screw was too long and protruded close to the bundles of wires and hoses and the electrician found that it had just punctured the insulation of the wire to the starter solenoid months earlier long before the batteries had been hooked up. An aluminum hull in the New Orleans summer can expand and contract a surprising amount and apparently the solenoid circuit was getting completed to ground as the hull cooled during the evenings and the screw found its original hole which was starting the motor! One guard and electrician managed to keep their jobs but one interior joiner was sent back to the crew boat yard out in the swamps that the company owned.

 

 

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Engineer friend of mine had family coming for Thanksgiving and the microwave/fan/hood thingy gave up. He bought a replacement, but couldn't find the studs to install the new one.

Being an engineer, he made a search pattern on 1" centers to drill pilot holes to find the studs. No Joy. So, he used toggle bolts (6 in all) to mount the doodad. At Thanksgiving dinner all the fam is sitting down in the dining room and Mrs. Engineer asks him to close the door between the dining room and kitchen. (spoiler alert!) It is a pocket door. Engineer had mounter the doodad through the hall and to the pocket door.

Much to his chagrin, the next day he had to undo it, with his father in law present. The door had 6 really big holes in it, and 30 really accurately spaced small holes in it.

Uni of Illinois finest!

He also was co cheap that he:

A) told his kids that the ice cream truck was actually the "music truck" because the man that owned really liked to see kids and say hi, and

B). took my 28" interior door to replace a 32" door in his house that had a hole in it.

It took 11 years until he sold the house to fix the pocket door or the door to the master bedroom (did I mention it was the MBR door that was 4" too narrow?)

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Once worked with a guy at a production shop who, while screwing sail locker floor cleats in place, screwed the boat to the tool. He had no idea. He then installed the floors and laminated them in place. Bitch getting the boat to release. 

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On 7/17/2018 at 8:36 PM, SloopJonB said:

Our bank manager's engineer husband was installing a piece of gear at anchor and drilled through the hull below the waterline.

there's a great story i've heard third or fourth hand where, at BIRW, everyone is sitting in the cockpit having a beer after racing while the owner is fiddlefucking with a power drill in the boat - maybe something to do with the companionway steps?. All of a sudden, they heard the "errrrrrrtTHUD" sound of the drill hitting the boat, followed shortly by the owner's head very quickly standing up in the companionway with a dumb look on their face while their foot tried to block the water from coming into the boat. Bit hazy on the details beyond that, like i said it's fourth hand and i may have been drunk when i heard the story... but the imagery of someone suddenly popping up from down below with their foot on a hole in the hull just brings a little smile to my face. 

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On a more personal note, i was once rebedding the scuppers on the 29er and was through bolting the top pintle at the same time (oh man i just realized i never told the new owner i did that.... meh). I had a flashlight so i could check the through bolts etc, i guess. Anywho, i button everything back up - 5200 and all. I get the boat back to the club, flip it over into the dolly as i hear something metallic rumble around inside my hull. The feeling of dread was pretty instant as i realized what the fuck was in the boat. Was just a little bit too big to get it out through the drain-hole, so back on the trailer it went to take it home. 10 hours of my life i'll never get back to cut out and clean the freshly bedded port  scupper so i could get the goddamn flashlight out. 

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23 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

       Next day the electricians and diesel mechanics ran diagnostics on everything and found nothing amiss. Everone was still puzzled but just shrugged and let it go. THEN that night at about the same time the boat cranked itself up once again! There had been a security camera re aimed from the penthouse to the boat and there was no sign of anyone going on the boat when it started up. There were big raceways running up the hullside for all the controls and wiring from the engineroom to the helm on the flybridge. The next day, we zipped off the velcroed coverpanels for the raceways in the master stateroom which was the only place that hadn't undergone scrutiny the day before. Lo and behold, there was a SS screw running through 3/4" wooden furring strips through aluminum framing that was used by us interior joiners to construct the interior. That single screw was too long and protruded close to the bundles of wires and hoses and the electrician found that it had just punctured the insulation of the wire to the starter solenoid months earlier long before the batteries had been hooked up. An aluminum hull in the New Orleans summer can expand and contract a surprising amount and apparently the solenoid circuit was getting completed to ground as the hull cooled during the evenings and the screw found its original hole which was starting the motor! One guard and electrician managed to keep their jobs but one interior joiner was sent back to the crew boat yard out in the swamps that the company owned.

 

 

Heard a story of an airplane that was having issues with the transponder giving erroneous altitude readings. They took it in and out of the plane several times, tones of ground tests, always perfect. But, then they'd get in the air and they'd be told to turn off altitude encoding because it was giving garbage data. Finally, they found the source of the problem: a wire was  tugged or otherwise being affected by the control column when the elevator was brought from it's rest position to roughly neutral. 

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A good -- but ever to remain nameless friend -- was in a bit of a hurry to fill his poorly vented diesel tanks.  To speed things up a bit, he removed an inspection plate.  Cutting to the obvious end, it took him days to remove the diesel, weeks to clean the residues and smells and months to placate his wife.

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A couple of years ago I installed a handrail on the one step up from my garage to my house to aid my elderly father's coming and going. I used one of those ultrasonic stud finders to locate a stud and screwed the railing hardware right there. The next day my wife asked why the drywall was all wet around the screws. Turns out the "stud" I used was the PVC sewer drain from the upstairs.  Easy enough to fix, though. I cut a hole in the drywall and slathered a bunch of 5200 in the holes. Still good to this day, but someday I will need to cover the hole so an inspector can't find it when I go to sell the house. 

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On 8/1/2018 at 10:43 AM, MisterMoon said:

A couple of years ago I installed a handrail on the one step up from my garage to my house to aid my elderly father's coming and going. I used one of those ultrasonic stud finders to locate a stud and screwed the railing hardware right there. The next day my wife asked why the drywall was all wet around the screws. Turns out the "stud" I used was the PVC sewer drain from the upstairs.  Easy enough to fix, though. I cut a hole in the drywall and slathered a bunch of 5200 in the holes. Still good to this day, but someday I will need to cover the hole so an inspector can't find it when I go to sell the house. 

https://www.reddit.com/r/tifu/comments/8vb50y/tifu_by_buying_a_house_that_wasnt_attached_to_the/

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Boss was putting in new floorboards in his ski boat in his garage one fall evening.

Screws were too long.

put 3 of them through the hull into the trailer bunks before his father in law who was watching stopped him.

Embarrassing...

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For a while I worked as a supermarket repair man, I got called outside, to find a collapsed brick pavement... after digging out the bricks and sand I found... The rain downpipe had never been connected to the main drain it just stopped in the sand...

On my house I turned on the bathroom electric heater and smoke started coming out of the electrical cabinet, which luckily the wife saw... The new gas boiler intallation professionals had cut the earth/ground wire. So when the bathroom heater developed a live to earth fault it made everything on the earth rail in the house go live. Luckily no one was touching metal work. The smoke came from a very old ELCB, which was an earth live trip circuit supply out to the garage which had a secondary earth.

There are many cases of New boats being delivered and put in the water... without anyone going on board and fitting the through hull echo sounders and speed logs...

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Had a first day new Oldsmobile minivan with a trim screw through the wiring harness.  Bought in daylight so we didn't notice the headlights and dash lights wouldn't work. Took them 2 days to sort it out.  But that was just the beginning.  Rear window washer leaked fluid inside under the headliner - poor connection to the tubing..  Air suspension was not well connected and kept cycling.  Battery would disconnect and the door locks wouldn't open.  Not sad to see Oldsmobile out of business.

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i heard of a brand new boat being taken out of the marina here with the new owners aboard. it was so new that this was the first time it had been moved, so obviously the electronic package had not been calibrated, but this hadn't occurred to the broker at the helm, who was showing the new owner how to engage the autohelm. the boat went hard right and t boned a super yacht marina. sheepish return to the travelift. 

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3 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Had a first day new Oldsmobile minivan with a trim screw through the wiring harness.  Bought in daylight so we didn't notice the headlights and dash lights wouldn't work. Took them 2 days to sort it out.  But that was just the beginning.  Rear window washer leaked fluid inside under the headliner - poor connection to the tubing..  Air suspension was not well connected and kept cycling.  Battery would disconnect and the door locks wouldn't open.  Not sad to see Oldsmobile out of business.

Sounds like you got the legendary Monday morning van, We had two Pontiac Trans Sports - the first year they made them and the last year. They were the same as your Silhouette.

Between the two we drove them for 22 years and they were phenomenally reliable and cheap to own. The first one went to 462,000 kilometers and we only got rid of it because it was getting too scruffy - droopy headliner etc. We replaced it with the last year ('96) and only just replaced that with a Range Rover last week.

In that 22 years the only significant repair we incurred was a rebuilt trans on the first one at 370,000 clicks.

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"Amazing how people can install things in boats without at least looking to see what they're going to drill into first."

F**King A to this statement.

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On 9/28/2018 at 11:30 AM, SloopJonB said:

only just replaced that with a Range Rover last week

Ha ha ha. Range Rover unreliability is so legendary. Good luck.

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I've never screwed up any of my installations, either on the boat or at home; all of them have worked first time, perfectly.

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I built a covered screen enclosure on the patio of my first home in Florida.   Did not cheap out on the materials bought the nice extruded aluminum channels and insulated roof with channels for electricity to support a fan. Lay down exterior grade carpet

turnd out nice, and to this day can still see it standing on google earth 20 years later

get the project done, fan hung, exterior lights are up all good.

about a week or so later after some rain, wife is complaining that when she opens the door she was getting shocked.  Obviously I don’t believe her.  I proceed to grab the screen door handle.   Nothing.  So now I’m thinking my pregnant wife is going crazy.  She touches handle jerks hand away like she’s touching a hot stove,  I touch. Nothing.   

Then it dawns on me....I’m wearing shoes, she’s not.   So it like the “wet paint” sign. You know you shouldn’t touch it, but you do anyhow....god almighty.   Now wife is laughing at me....

come to find out that one of the one of the covers that concealed the electric wires, I drove a self tapping screw into the wires.  Oops...

 

have a a story about driving a piece of rebar through the main water supply four feet below grade, on a Sunday...

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On 9/28/2018 at 7:30 PM, SloopJonB said:

Sounds like you got the legendary Monday morning van, We had two Pontiac Trans Sports - the first year they made them and the last year. They were the same as your Silhouette.

Between the two we drove them for 22 years and they were phenomenally reliable and cheap to own. The first one went to 462,000 kilometers and we only got rid of it because it was getting too scruffy - droopy headliner etc. We replaced it with the last year ('96) and only just replaced that with a Range Rover last week.

In that 22 years the only significant repair we incurred was a rebuilt trans on the first one at 370,000 clicks.

Good luck with the Range Rover, the cost of servicing and spares is not cheap! 

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9 hours ago, Zonker said:

Ha ha ha. Range Rover unreliability is so legendary. Good luck.

Well the guy who looks after my XJR bought his wife one so...... Both he and his mechanic checked it over and commented that it was a very nice one.

Anyway, I got it so cheap I can sell it for a big profit if I change my mind. I paid less for it that the original owner (who we bought it from) paid in sales taxes so I figure I can afford a few big bills and still be driving something special for cheap. Keeriste is it thirsty though.

It's by far the nicest truck I've ever driven but the driver controls are insanely complicated. Customizable sweep time on the rear wiper FFS. :rolleyes: It's like the systems were designed by Microsoft. Who needs to have a screen image of the front wheels steering angle in real time? Or the suspension movement by individual wheel? Temperature selectors for the seat heaters?

Absolutely nutzo gadgetry - but it does drive nicely - sort of a Jaguar truck.

 

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

sort of a Jaguar truck.

Just a coincidence, isn't it?

But I must say, some claim eg Jaguars are expensive to own and spend most of their time at the workshop. Which in my experience is pure BS, Jaguars are of far higher quality than the german cars (Merc, BMW, Audi), spare parts are cheap and ... well there is this about thirst. 

 

//J

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There was a boat 28 foot here about 12-25 years ago that had work done on that involved drilling though a bulkhead from one side. long story short the drill nicked a gas line and eventually it went-boom. Very ugly https://www.maritimenz.govt.nz/commercial/safety/accidents-reporting/accident-reports/documents/Lucky-Star-051178-mnz-accident-report2005.pdf

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On ‎9‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 6:24 AM, Alcatraz5768 said:

ti heard of a brand new boat being taken out of the marina here with the new owners aboard. it was so new that this was the first time it had been moved, so obviously the electronic package had not been calibrated, but this hadn't occurred to the broker at the helm, who was showing the new owner how to engage the autohelm. the boat went hard right and t boned a super yacht marina. sheepish return to the travelift. 

Happened again at the boat show over the weekend

 

bang.JPG

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It's not just the new ones. I upgraded my Raymarine chartplotter from the Lighthouse II OS to the LHIII OS before my summer cruise. While in the fog, I had the usual mix of AIS targets  and radar echoes from non-AIS boats  About halfway across the  straits I realized that none of my AIS targets had radar returns. After 5 minutes of troubleshooting, I figured out that the Radar alignment convention had rotated 180 degrees between OS versions. What used to be 5° to port was now 175° to starboard. Obviously, I should've done a more thorough shakedown after the upgrade but it would've been nice to have a mention in the release notes from Raymarine...

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On 7/18/2018 at 5:06 PM, Monkey said:

I’ve had to clean up a boat with at least that much diesel spilled in the bilge. Twice. Not fun. 

Yeah.  I agree not fun at all.  I think after 2 years (and many many cleanings) the interior of my boat is finally beginning to smell better.  In my case, it was the diesel fill line from the deck.  It hadn't bee properly secured and the pressure from being complete filled had it fall off the connection point under the hull.  The gas pump guy just kept pumping until I asked "wait a minute.  you put HOW much in?"

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A human interface problem.

I'm sitting on the quay of my sailing club,  when a 40ft hire motorboat cruiser goes past,  the man says to the girl,  here you take over and heads to the heads... 

She stands their shouting, "what do I do??? " The river does a 90 right at this point.. There are motorboats moored on the outside of the bend.... She T Bones one amidships.  The bow goes through a cabin window and crunches on into the roof,  the hull is split down the side and just below the water line. 

Several club members run to the rescue,  One has a spare tarpaulin  we drop it into the water and the water pressure holds it over the split  preventing the boat sinking.. 

Shortly after the crunch the male  had reappeared with an embarrassingly placed wet patch on his trousers. 

Luckily  the crew of the moored boat were in the pub so there were no injuries... 

 

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On 9/30/2018 at 1:48 AM, Zonker said:

Ha ha ha. Range Rover unreliability is so legendary. Good luck.

friend of mine got a discovery when they first came out, he got tired of taking it in when the check engine light came on...  so he only took it in when the check engine light went off..

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23 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Well the guy who looks after my XJR bought his wife one so...... Both he and his mechanic checked it over and commented that it was a very nice one.

Anyway, I got it so cheap I can sell it for a big profit if I change my mind. I paid less for it that the original owner (who we bought it from) paid in sales taxes so I figure I can afford a few big bills and still be driving something special for cheap. Keeriste is it thirsty though.

It's by far the nicest truck I've ever driven but the driver controls are insanely complicated. Customizable sweep time on the rear wiper FFS. :rolleyes: It's like the systems were designed by Microsoft. Who needs to have a screen image of the front wheels steering angle in real time? Or the suspension movement by individual wheel? Temperature selectors for the seat heaters?

Absolutely nutzo gadgetry - but it does drive nicely - sort of a Jaguar truck.

 

maybe they actually expected the owners to take them offroad and use it to climb things..  i guess car designers can dream..

 

this one is on my dad,  always too cheap to pay some one to put in a fence,  using an power auger cut his phone / cable line and the gas line...  plus the bad case of tennis elbow since he was too cheap to rent a nail gun and used a hammer..

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49 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

maybe they actually expected the owners to take them offroad and use it to climb things..  i guess car designers can dream..

Are offroaders incapable of knowing if they have turned the steering wheel?

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Are offroaders incapable of knowing if they have turned the steering wheel?

actually when they take them down big dunes in the sahara they often have spotters at the bottom of the dune to hand signal keeping the wheels straight. They will get off course with no feel or feedback to the steering then dig in like a rudder and roll the truck. You'd have to see it to believe it, 99% of Range rover guys dont need this.ever.

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Are you familiar with the legendary Doug DeMuro and why you can't buy a Range Rover at Carmax with a cheap Carmax warranty:

His videos of the repairs are hilarious. Including how he got trapped by the power tilt steering wheel. Or how many times the air suspension collapsed. 

Another Update: Owning an Unreliable Car With a CarMax Warranty

My Range Rover’s CarMax Warranty Is Now Half Over And It's Saved Me More Than $6000

You Can't Get A Cheap CarMax Range Rover Warranty Anymore

From the period of his warranty was only half over:

"The first time it broke was February 20, 2013, before I ever started writing about cars, when I took it to the dealer for an oil change and they discovered the radiator was leaking and my lower control arms were worn. "

"The next came in October, when my tilt steering column motor failed in the down position. "

"Just six months later, the tilt steering column motor failed again"

"The next repair came a mere two months later, when I walked outside to discover that my Range Rover was listing to one side like a Russian fishing vessel after an illegal trip to international waters. That was the air suspension failing on the passenger side – and while it was in for repairs, the dealer noticed that something called the “transmission sleeve”"

" In August, I went to honk at some idiot who had stopped for a green light, and I discovered I had completely lost the use of my horn."

"This year started off relatively trouble-free: my only repair in the first half of 2015 came in January, when my driver’s side air suspension failedat a cost of $1,399.36. But then in June, my parking sensors failed"

 

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Thanks for the good wishes Zonk.

Fuck you too. ;)

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On 9/30/2018 at 3:01 PM, Gutterblack said:

There was a boat 28 foot here about 12-25 years ago that had work done on that involved drilling though a bulkhead from one side. long story short the drill nicked a gas line and eventually it went-boom. Very ugly https://www.maritimenz.govt.nz/commercial/safety/accidents-reporting/accident-reports/documents/Lucky-Star-051178-mnz-accident-report2005.pdf

I think that nails it...you know someone screwed up when it goes BOOM

BOOM OOPS.png

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My father told me a tale of when, in his younger years, he was doing a delivery on what was apparently a Swan knock off.  It got rather windy during the delivery, and as the wind increased, headsail shape kept going more and more to shit.  So he goes up to the bow to see whats up.  Turns out the people that built this boat did not use mechanical fasteners to secure the foredeck to the hull.  The headsail shackle was attached to a pad eye in the bow, bolted to a backing plate under the deck.  The foredeck was attached to the hull with some butyl tape and a few bits of fiberglass tape bonding the hull and deck together.  During the delivery the stresses began to peel the hull/deck joint apart at the bow.  At that point waves hit 5 feet or so, and there was no way to keep water from entering the boat.  Damn thing nearly sank on the delivery.  

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Reminds me of at least one Catalina 27 deck opening up in SF bay went to the bottom! Early 70's

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I've heard lots of stories of boats decks coming off - pop rivets being a classic.

I've never spoken to anyone who actually saw it happen or even the aftermath - it was always a friend of someones cousin.

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I've heard lots of stories of boats decks coming off - pop rivets being a classic.

I've never spoken to anyone who actually saw it happen or even the aftermath - it was always a friend of someones cousin.

Isn't that a tiny little bit like speaking to people who's parachutes didn't open? 

Cheers,

               W.

 

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On 10/4/2018 at 11:51 PM, SloopJonB said:

I've heard lots of stories of boats decks coming off - pop rivets being a classic.

I've never spoken to anyone who actually saw it happen or even the aftermath - it was always a friend of someones cousin.

 

I witnessed one while working on my boat at the club one day.  small keelboats anchored out in the water.  friend had his on the outer edge where he'd get the full fetch of the lake..  i caught movement out of my eye and looked over, didn't see anything, two more times it happenend.. finally foredeck popped open like the hood of a car and mast fell backwards, fortunately his boat cover kept it attached to the mooring ball by a small miracle.    the guy I talked about above with the bondo,   he fixed it... these boats had a small trianglular cone glued into the very front.. his solution, large ss lag bolt through the bow / cone..   I call his boat, frankenstein's monster as the bolt had and nut are on the outside of the bow..

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