Sailingsubmarine

Fast affordable dinghy for 2

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My mom and I are interested in a two person racing dinghy. I am 14 and weigh 49 kg and she is 40 and weighs 52 kg. We have a decent amount of experience and love to learn on the water first hand. Our budget is 5,000 USD. Jib and spinnaker/gennaker capability is a must.  Trapezes are fine and we happy to have them, although they are not a must. We are both speed lovers and high speed is a must. Maintenance and repair are totally fine and we are able to do anything except for a full rebuild and replace every part. Used boats that need repair are fine. Any suggestions?

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Where are you located?

Buccaneer 18 would fit the bill and should be able to find a decent one for 5K. You guys are light so would be plenty fast enough. If in a high wind area she is going to be too much boat/sail area for your weight though.

 

 

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RS 200 and/or Laser 2000(now RS 2000) would be perfect but if you are US East Coast....not many around.

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Where I live its hard to find a decent sized entry level modern 2 person dinghy with critical mass.that has a spinnaker. The couples all sail Vanguard 15s (nice but a bit underpowered downwind)  and JY15s (even more underpowered)

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You are looking for a  " two person racing dinghy ". If racing is what you want to do on the water then buy ONLY a " two person racing dinghy " that is raced actively in your area or you will wind up day sailing in your new boat. Happy Sailing! 

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You're a good weight combination for my favorite two person boat, the Fireball. Unfortunately there aren't many of those around. Pity, because they are totally awesome boats. 

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15 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

RS 200 and/or Laser 2000(now RS 2000) would be perfect but if you are US East Coast....not many around.

you missed the bit where OP said they want something fast...

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10 hours ago, dgmckim said:

You're a good weight combination for my favorite two person boat, the Fireball. Unfortunately there aren't many of those around. Pity, because they are totally awesome boats. 

Great idea and there used to be lots of them in the US.....but sadly we dont see them anymore

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29 minutes ago, chris_w said:

you missed the bit where OP said they want something fast...

He is from Texas. Come over here. We will put you in a Flying Scot on Galveston Bay for a couple of hours and then ask you what meets the definition of "fast".   Our largest dinghy class after the Laser is probably the Thistle. We could probably charge entry fees to curious European tourists to enter dinghy sailing's  Jurassic Park. 

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7 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

He is from Texas. Come over here. We will put you in a Flying Scot on Galveston Bay for a couple of hours and then ask you what meets the definition of "fast".   Our largest dinghy class after the Laser is probably the Thistle. We could probably charge entry fees to curious European tourists to enter dinghy sailing's  Jurassic Park. 

:lol: That's funny! Same on the Chesapeake, the Buccaneer 18 IS the new boat! LOL

29'er is a good idea but I have not seen one in years. Are there any active fleets? Probably can find one but yep going to be day sailing or racing Portsmouth.

 

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21 hours ago, Sailingsubmarine said:

I am in Houston, Texas 

Someone in my ‘hood.

I believe the RS boats are really popular in Galveston. Take a look at the Texas Centerboard Circuit members for what seems to be a popular boat to race. I may be racing a DS1 Oday next year.

Any thought to running a catamaran? That's plenty of speed and can be done quite cheap.

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11 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

He is from Texas. Come over here. We will put you in a Flying Scot on Galveston Bay for a couple of hours and then ask you what meets the definition of "fast".   Our largest dinghy class after the Laser is probably the Thistle. We could probably charge entry fees to curious European tourists to enter dinghy sailing's  Jurassic Park. 

I'd love to. Can you DM me with more info.

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19 hours ago, dgmckim said:

You're a good weight combination for my favorite two person boat, the Fireball. Unfortunately there aren't many of those around. Pity, because they are totally awesome boats. 

I am an ex-Fireballer and love the boat, but 225lbs skipper/crew weight is too light. Unless, of course, the mom is 6'2'' with abnormal strength. Plus the 14 year old 100 lb son better be pretty sturdy lest he gets pulled through the mainsheet block sailing in a blow.  In surfing through the Johnson 18 pages, 350 lbs or more seems to be "recommended". So the larger aunt would need to join them!  Concerning the 29er, Mackay Boats (NZ) website says the optimal combined crew weight is considered to be 270 lbs to 320 lbs. And, seriously, has anyone ever looked at a 29er and thought "Now there is a great mom and son boat!".  Maybe for the Wallenda family...

Tough one. A fast (whatever that means) two-person boat for lightweights on a $5,000 budget.  OutofOffice may be on the right track with a cat of some sort.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, OutofOffice said:

Someone in my ‘hood.

I believe the RS boats are really popular in Galveston. Take a look at the Texas Centerboard Circuit members for what seems to be a popular boat to race. I may be racing a DS1 Oday next year.

Any thought to running a catamaran? That's plenty of speed and can be done quite cheap.

Would be open to a cat. Also when i said racing i meant like friendly competition against friends. nothing serious.

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7 minutes ago, Sailingsubmarine said:

Would be open to a cat. Also when i said racing i meant like friendly competition against friends. nothing serious.

It’s all friendly competition. I race on catamarans locally and there’s nothing too serious about it. I imagine the TCC is the same. I can give you some contact information if you want to explore catamarans further. (*gasp* Blasphemy! This is the Dinghy forum)

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39 minutes ago, bill4 said:

I am an ex-Fireballer and love the boat, but 225lbs skipper/crew weight is too light. Unless, of course, the mom is 6'2'' with abnormal strength. Plus the 14 year old 100 lb son better be pretty sturdy lest he gets pulled through the mainsheet block sailing in a blow.  In surfing through the Johnson 18 pages, 350 lbs or more seems to be "recommended". So the larger aunt would need to join them!  Concerning the 29er, Mackay Boats (NZ) website says the optimal combined crew weight is considered to be 270 lbs to 320 lbs. And, seriously, has anyone ever looked at a 29er and thought "Now there is a great mom and son boat!".  Maybe for the Wallenda family...

Tough one. A fast (whatever that means) two-person boat for lightweights on a $5,000 budget.  OutofOffice may be on the right track with a cat of some sort.

 

 

 

The 29er is fairly easy to depower, and I race with a combined crew weight of about 230. And that’s with the lighter one on the trap

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1 hour ago, bill4 said:

I am an ex-Fireballer and love the boat, but 225lbs skipper/crew weight is too light. Unless, of course, the mom is 6'2'' with abnormal strength. Plus the 14 year old 100 lb son better be pretty sturdy lest he gets pulled through the mainsheet block sailing in a blow.  In surfing through the Johnson 18 pages, 350 lbs or more seems to be "recommended". So the larger aunt would need to join them!  Concerning the 29er, Mackay Boats (NZ) website says the optimal combined crew weight is considered to be 270 lbs to 320 lbs. And, seriously, has anyone ever looked at a 29er and thought "Now there is a great mom and son boat!".  Maybe for the Wallenda family...

Tough one. A fast (whatever that means) two-person boat for lightweights on a $5,000 budget.  OutofOffice may be on the right track with a cat of some sort.

 

 

 

2 things:

- i have no idea what the conversion from kg/lbs is

- i will always advocate fireballs when someone asks what a good, fast 2 person boat is.

jokes aside, while it's maybe not totally ideal now, it's a boat they would really grow into. I think it's a good choice because it's a very manageable rig with a hull weight of 169lbs and a smaller sail plan than similar high performance dinghies. Easy to get on and off the trailer, easy to pull up/down a ramp, and really fun!

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2 hours ago, dgmckim said:

i have no idea what the conversion from kg/lbs is

1 Kg is 2.2 Lbs.

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5 hours ago, Sailingsubmarine said:

I'd love to. Can you DM me with more info.

I was about to reply that:..Sailing a Flying Scot is about as exciting as listening to curling on the radio...

But then I realized that Sub would probably reply " Wow that sounds great, what station can I tune onto?" 

So enough of the analogies, I will lay it out straight.  Do not under any circumstances acquire a Flying Scot as a fast two person dinghy.  The disadvantage of living in the US  is that a vast amount of our dinghy sailing is slow, heavy and outdated .  You could see if there are some used RS dinghies in your locale. Kolius Sailing is a useful contact.  The British poster answered that the RS 200 and RS (aka Laser) 2000 is not high performance....but he was comparing it to British dinghy fleets. Compared to US dinghy fleets, they are easy to sail for a lighter weight duo and lighter/faster/ more modern than the large fleets of Flying Scots, Thistles, FJs , and other 50 year old designs that can be found in our dinghy parks. 

 

Good of luck out there. Have you and Mom sailed a 420 ? It's not the end of the world and your local club might have a program that charters them out of the junior sailing fleet.

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9 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

I was about to reply that:..Sailing a Flying Scot is about as exciting as listening to curling on the radio...

But then I realized that Sub would probably reply " Wow that sounds great, what station can I tune onto?" 

So enough of the analogies, I will lay it out straight.  Do not under any circumstances acquire a Flying Scot as a fast two person dinghy.  The disadvantage of living in the US  is that a vast amount of our dinghy sailing is slow, heavy and outdated .  You could see if there are some used RS dinghies in your locale. Kolius Sailing is a useful contact.  The British poster answered that the RS 200 and RS (aka Laser) 2000 is not high performance....but he was comparing it to British dinghy fleets. Compared to US dinghy fleets, they are easy to sail for a lighter weight duo and lighter/faster/ more modern than the large fleets of Flying Scots, Thistles, FJs , and other 50 year old designs that can be found in our dinghy parks. 

 

Good of luck out there. Have you and Mom sailed a 420 ? It's not the end of the world and your local club might have a program that charters them out of the junior sailing fleet.

Might check out the texas centerboard website and thread here, if your from texas.  Get a boat, whatever boat- and come join the fun.   FYI thinking back - might be some cheap 505's,  470's or even a random Flying Dutchman around.   Didn't SSC have a bunch of 470's?   great little boat for two light-weights ;-)    http://www.texascenterboard.org/   

 

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17 hours ago, dgmckim said:

2 things:

- i have no idea what the conversion from kg/lbs is

- i will always advocate fireballs when someone asks what a good, fast 2 person boat is.

jokes aside, while it's maybe not totally ideal now, it's a boat they would really grow into. I think it's a good choice because it's a very manageable rig with a hull weight of 169lbs and a smaller sail plan than similar high performance dinghies. Easy to get on and off the trailer, easy to pull up/down a ramp, and really fun!

I love fireballs but 220lb all up is just not going to work.  You need two halfway beefy peeps to have fun on one as soon as there is any kind of breeze

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13 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

I was about to reply that:..Sailing a Flying Scot is about as exciting as listening to curling on the radio...

But then I realized that Sub would probably reply " Wow that sounds great, what station can I tune onto?" 

So enough of the analogies, I will lay it out straight.  Do not under any circumstances acquire a Flying Scot as a fast two person dinghy.  The disadvantage of living in the US  is that a vast amount of our dinghy sailing is slow, heavy and outdated .  You could see if there are some used RS dinghies in your locale. Kolius Sailing is a useful contact.  The British poster answered that the RS 200 and RS (aka Laser) 2000 is not high performance....but he was comparing it to British dinghy fleets. Compared to US dinghy fleets, they are easy to sail for a lighter weight duo and lighter/faster/ more modern than the large fleets of Flying Scots, Thistles, FJs , and other 50 year old designs that can be found in our dinghy parks. 

 

Good of luck out there. Have you and Mom sailed a 420 ? It's not the end of the world and your local club might have a program that charters them out of the junior sailing fleet.

I would agree with your advice on the FS - it really is a floating party barge for a family

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4 hours ago, sushi said:

Might check out the texas centerboard website and thread here, if your from texas.  Get a boat, whatever boat- and come join the fun.   FYI thinking back - might be some cheap 505's,  470's or even a random Flying Dutchman around.   Didn't SSC have a bunch of 470's?   great little boat for two light-weights ;-)    http://www.texascenterboard.org/   

 

Texas Centerboard community seems like one of the most active dinghy communities in US.

But the FD is probably way too much boat for a 115 lb Mom and her 107 lb 14 year old son.  The 470 is not a bad idea. But honestly, why not start off with a 420? Cheap, available and good starter.  

Here is one for $2,000....dicker on the trailer and you probably have boat and trailer for $2,500 with great condition sails. http://www.420sailing.org/content/buy-and-sell

Decent 470 will be $10,000 +

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22 minutes ago, Christian said:

I love fireballs but 220lb all up is just not going to work.  You need two halfway beefy peeps to have fun on one as soon as there is any kind of breeze

Fireballs used to be a big fleet here on LIS (Im on Eastern LIS).   They were sailed by husband wife teams and juniors. Benjy (Steve Benjamin) sailed on the Fireball  and he is not big.  Back in the day, the World champions were a husband /wife team from Westport.  I doubt they were much more than 300 lbs.   But they are all gone now (The Fireballs not the husbands!). I havent seen a Fireball on LIS in a decade although I know they surface from time to time for the HPDO at AYC.

220 is light for the average American barge.   420 is one idea.  Another...if you can bear to do without the spinnaker...is the Vanguard 15. Lots and lots of V15s around. they are well built and go upwind nicely. Fun boat to sail with Mom. I (a Mom) sailed one with my son when he was around 14 (long time ago) when we were on vacation at Bitter End.

 

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420 might work for now, but teenager is likely to grow.  470... are there any in/around Houston?  505 fits the bill for price & performance, but could be too much to handle at this stage now if the breeze piped up.  OTOH it appears that light air is not rare in HOU, and the 505 performs well in heavy or light air.  Are there other 505's in HOU to race with?

Caveat: Poster owns International 505 US 8172 

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 Any Laser-2s left around your way?  Sometimes seems every dinghy park has a couple sitting neglected in a corner.  If you can find one with decent sails and foils it's a fast, fun boat, especially on flat water. Designed as a youth boat, so should suit your crew weights. Trapeze and spinnaker- there was a later variant (L-3000?) with an asymmetric. Not sailed one of those. 

 Around here, the hull has no real value, as there are lots of them about.  The foils can be expensive to replace and are often missing. Price should reflect the abundant supply and minimal demand...

Cheers,

               W.

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Cmon guys, the 420/470 idea is slower than dogshit.

Just too far up the curve is I14, which in below 14 knots is cool with 110 kg/240 lbs. Save that one.

Only two good boats really, though very different.

a) 505

b) Taser

IMO, in your not so windy location, you and your trapezing mum will gets lotsa fun from the 505. Just need beach/beach trolley onto the trailer?

 

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RS200 is pretty quick in a blow (check my youtube link below), straight line speed off the wind is probably not dissimilar to a fireball. Fireballs go a lot lower downwind and are lot faster upwind so handicap is markedly faster. But I don't think top speeds would be massively dissimilar. 

Unless really windy Tasar top speeds are on close reaches. It's quite a interesting comparison racing regularly against tasar in our 200. The speed difference for different legs are huge. Makes the racing  a little comical at times. 

Also, the 200 produces a lot of spray, so that adds the feeling of 'fast' which is probably more important than actual recorded speed when it comes to enjoyment.  

Weight wise the 200 is pretty as perfect as you can get for mum and child (you'd still be a little light at those weights, but not a million miles off). 

But... if you want to race, buy something that is being raced.  

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21 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

Texas Centerboard community seems like one of the most active dinghy communities in US.

But the FD is probably way too much boat for a 115 lb Mom and her 107 lb 14 year old son.  The 470 is not a bad idea. But honestly, why not start off with a 420? Cheap, available and good starter.  

Here is one for $2,000....dicker on the trailer and you probably have boat and trailer for $2,500 with great condition sails. http://www.420sailing.org/content/buy-and-sell

Decent 470 will be $10,000 +

420's are dump trucks, not a lot better than a flying sidewalk.  Don't waste your money.  

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Some good advice here but approaching it the wrong g way.

Yes, you want a boat with at least a small fleet. Fortunately you are in Texas Centerboard Circuit country, so that opens it up a lot.

The Coronado 15 is a great boat. Simple, powerful, easy to sail at the basic level but rewarding to increase skill. But they are also 30ish years old, it's unlikely you can find one that doesn't need work.

The Johnson 18 would be another favorite of mine, raced one with my wife for a few years. Big big fun.

But it does no good to say "yes Boat XYZ is perfect for you" if you can't buy one. Start by looking on Craigslist and see what you could actually get.

And go sailing. Even on a Flying Scot. You'll learn more than you realize

FB- Doug

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We are dealing with two people that wouldn't stand out in an group of Opti sailors. Most of the suggestions make no sense.

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6 hours ago, Frogman56 said:

Cmon guys, the 420/470 idea is slower than dogshit.

Just too far up the curve is I14, which in below 14 knots is cool with 110 kg/240 lbs. Save that one.

Only two good boats really, though very different.

a) 505

b) Taser

IMO, in your not so windy location, you and your trapezing mum will gets lotsa fun from the 505. Just need beach/beach trolley onto the trailer?

 

how is a 505 a good option for people who are underweight for a fireball? seriously

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3 hours ago, dgmckim said:

how is a 505 a good option for people who are underweight for a fireball? seriously

Not to mention the 5K budget. Or can an older one be found for that???

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Fun, fast and manageable by two “un-big” people. Jib and gennaker. Texas. Recreational racing. I have never seen one, but a Weta might fit these criteria. Looks like a slender dinghy with training hullls to me. $5,000 might be tough, but I see one for sale in Texas for $7,500. 

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On 7/25/2018 at 4:18 PM, Hobie Dog said:

:lol: That's funny! Same on the Chesapeake, the Buccaneer 18 IS the new boat! LOL

29'er is a good idea but I have not seen one in years. Are there any active fleets? Probably can find one but yep going to be day sailing or racing Portsmouth.

 

class is actually gaining traction on both coats finally. It's still a fleet you'll need to travel to race, but it's getting better. (from what i've seen/talked to people about, i've been out for several years now)

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On 7/25/2018 at 5:43 PM, bill4 said:

I am an ex-Fireballer and love the boat, but 225lbs skipper/crew weight is too light. Unless, of course, the mom is 6'2'' with abnormal strength. Plus the 14 year old 100 lb son better be pretty sturdy lest he gets pulled through the mainsheet block sailing in a blow.  In surfing through the Johnson 18 pages, 350 lbs or more seems to be "recommended". So the larger aunt would need to join them!  Concerning the 29er, Mackay Boats (NZ) website says the optimal combined crew weight is considered to be 270 lbs to 320 lbs. And, seriously, has anyone ever looked at a 29er and thought "Now there is a great mom and son boat!".  Maybe for the Wallenda family...

Tough one. A fast (whatever that means) two-person boat for lightweights on a $5,000 budget.  OutofOffice may be on the right track with a cat of some sort.

 

 

 

Unless you take it out in 20kts the first time you ever sail it, it's a pretty manageable boat. You need to learn how to balance it, which some people struggle with - particularly when they come from overly stable boats like flying scots or other training wheel boats. The boat can be sailed very competitively around 230lbs i think. My preference was around 280 (130(me)+150lbs), but i got wupped by some light people quite a few times, and also wupped heavier people in breeze.Regardless, i don't think it's the right boat for them due to the distance to fleets - unless they can convince some of their friends to get 29er's too, which would be perfect. 

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Casual, handicap racing with a bunch of friendly Texans should fit the bill!

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Weta, that is....

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50 minutes ago, mustang__1 said:

Unless you take it out in 20kts the first time you ever sail it, it's a pretty manageable boat. You need to learn how to balance it, which some people struggle with - particularly when they come from overly stable boats like flying scots or other training wheel boats. The boat can be sailed very competitively around 230lbs i think. My preference was around 280 (130(me)+150lbs), but i got wupped by some light people quite a few times, and also wupped heavier people in breeze.Regardless, i don't think it's the right boat for them due to the distance to fleets - unless they can convince some of their friends to get 29er's too, which would be perfect. 

So how many 40 year old moms are rockin" 29er land?

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17 minutes ago, bill4 said:

So how many 40 year old moms are rockin" 29er land?

None that i know, but there's no reason they can't. There are plenty of mothers out there that ride mountain bikes, rock climb, whatever. At 110lbs they're probably not unauthentic. 

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On 7/25/2018 at 4:59 PM, Rasputin22 said:

Coronado 15 is hard to beat as a starter racing dinghy. If you can find one...

 

I like it! Wish C-15s were still in production. 

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On 7/27/2018 at 9:54 AM, sushi said:

420's are dump trucks, not a lot better than a flying sidewalk.  Don't waste your money.  

I420???

I think you refer to the club 420.

Im not saying that it is equivalent of 5-0-5 and other super high performance dinghies like but for a lightweight Mom and Son team, its not a bad idea to look at and its completely within the $5k budget.

13690612_1219404468090171_9118459757727244230_n-620x350.jpg.7ee6eddf6071772d9f6e37849cac8731.jpg

 

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On 7/27/2018 at 10:38 AM, dgmckim said:

how is a 505 a good option for people who are underweight for a fireball? seriously

The 505 is ultra tuneable. There’s nothing out there comparable.  There’s an active 505 team of college Sophmore women, out of Hampton Va.  who I doubt weigh 220# combined and they finished mid fleet at the Worlds and the smaller of the 2 crews! For the record I sail 505 8822.

However the boat rigging is usually quite complex but I have seen some simplified.

420 is ultra slow except in a blow.

Laser 2 Portsmouth rating is slower than a laser.

470 if you can find one would work as well as a Coranado 15 or a 29er.

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Tunable sounds like easy to sail. 

I think a 505 is a bit to hard to start with. They will swim more than sail in the beginning. And than you get frustrated and leave. 

470 is possible, bur will be hard as well in the beginning. 

Start with 420 and in 2/3 years sell it and buy something else. 

Or buy a 505, swim a lot, sell the boat and look for another hobby

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34 minutes ago, dburchfiel said:

The 505 is ultra tuneable. There’s nothing out there comparable.  There’s an active 505 team of college Sophmore women, out of Hampton Va.  who I doubt weigh 220# combined and they finished mid fleet at the Worlds and the smaller of the 2 crews! For the record I sail 505 8822.

However the boat rigging is usually quite complex but I have seen some simplified.

420 is ultra slow except in a blow.

Laser 2 Portsmouth rating is slower than a laser.

470 if you can find one would work as well as a Coranado 15 or a 29er.

Laser PN is 1098, Laser-2 is 1075 (2018 numbers). I would guess that a 2 is easier to sail to its handicap than the Laser, as well. 

  As others have said, though, the key is the local fleet, if you want to race. 

Cheers,

              W.

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4 hours ago, dburchfiel said:

The 505 is ultra tuneable. There’s nothing out there comparable.  There’s an active 505 team of college Sophmore women, out of Hampton Va.  who I doubt weigh 220# combined and they finished mid fleet at the Worlds and the smaller of the 2 crews! For the record I sail 505 8822.

However the boat rigging is usually quite complex but I have seen some simplified.

420 is ultra slow except in a blow.

Laser 2 Portsmouth rating is slower than a laser.

470 if you can find one would work as well as a Coranado 15 or a 29er.

Fireball is also ultra tune-able. Great for lightweight crews, especially once the winds get heavy. Are there going to be any 505s in Wrightsville this weekend for SAYRA?

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19 hours ago, gewoon ik said:

Tunable sounds like easy to sail. 

I think a 505 is a bit to hard to start with. They will swim more than sail in the beginning. And than you get frustrated and leave. 

470 is possible, bur will be hard as well in the beginning. 

Start with 420 and in 2/3 years sell it and buy something else. 

Or buy a 505, swim a lot, sell the boat and look for another hobby

505 is the pinnacle of 2 person dinghy racing. Fantastic boats. But I agree with this poster, maybe start hiking in the Appalachians before setting off for the Himalayas.

For the first time dinghy for Mom and her 14 year old son, Im sticking with Vanguard 15, I 420 or a local one design that is sailed at a club nearby. If there were some local RS two person dinghies around, they would be ideal but that is a long shot in the US.

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On 7/30/2018 at 11:18 AM, EYESAILOR said:

I420???

I think you refer to the club 420.

Im not saying that it is equivalent of 5-0-5 and other super high performance dinghies like but for a lightweight Mom and Son team, its not a bad idea to look at and its completely within the $5k budget.

13690612_1219404468090171_9118459757727244230_n-620x350.jpg.7ee6eddf6071772d9f6e37849cac8731.jpg

 

so..... you're suggesting they get an I420 for sailing in portsmouth? yeah ok... Might as well get a 470 then (which is, actually, a great boat and i love them). An I420 for $5k is going to be a clapped out bendy boat that is still not going to be as much fun to sail in portsmouth as a 470. 

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2 minutes ago, mustang__1 said:

 An I420 for $5k is going to be a clapped out bendy boat that is still not going to be as much fun to sail in portsmouth as a 470. 

2013 Blue Blue
Very fast boat with immaculate hull
Double Stacking Road Trailer
2015 European silver Medal winner
Dry stored
Comes with:
Brand new mast
Good condition DEM foils
Launching trolley to fit a road trailer

2 Race condition North M7 mainsails
1 Training condition North M7 mainsail

1 Race Condition North jib (used for one event)
2 Training North Jibs
2 old North J9 Jibs

2 Race condition North kites (one has only been used for two events)
1 Super lightweight Neil Marsden Kite
2 North/Marsden training kites

Asking price E 5,000

 

Second owner . Two sets of sails included. 420 and trailer are in excellent condition (used only once by current owner)
Model: I420
Year: 2013
Location: Greenwich, Ct
Hull Manufacturer:

Nautivela

Price $6,000

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Agree 470 is nicer boat for adults and an aspiring Olympian but a reasonable condition I470 is around $10,000 .  They will be fine starting out in a I420 or a Vanguard 15 or any other entry level 2 person lightweight dinghy. KISS

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I think the risk of clapped out 470 is bigger than on a 420. Especially when it is used for a couples of years racing. 

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3 hours ago, gewoon ik said:

I think the risk of clapped out 470 is bigger than on a 420. Especially when it is used for a couples of years racing. 

it'd be fine for portsmouth or club level 470 sailing (they actually do get several boats out for some lake sailing at variance places in flyover country)

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On 8/2/2018 at 4:04 PM, mustang__1 said:
On 8/2/2018 at 12:24 PM, gewoon ik said:

I think the risk of clapped out 470 is bigger than on a 420. Especially when it is used for a couples of years racing. 

it'd be fine for portsmouth or club level 470 sailing (they actually do get several boats out for some lake sailing at variance places in flyover country)

The biggest problem with buying an old clapped-out 470 for fun daysailing is the expense of getting all the running rigging up to snuff, and the low boom. Unlike the 5O5 it's not such an overpowering boat that you not only need all the controls, you need them all split with high purchases.... the 470 is a good candidate for simplifying. Especially if you don't mind restitching the foot on the main about 14" higher.........

You can often pick 'em up on Craigslist for a song

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

The biggest problem with buying an old clapped-out 470 for fun daysailing is the expense of getting all the running rigging up to snuff, and the low boom. Unlike the 5O5 it's not such an overpowering boat that you not only need all the controls, you need them all split with high purchases.... the 470 is a good candidate for simplifying. Especially if you don't mind restitching the foot on the main about 14" higher.........

You can often pick 'em up on Craigslist for a song

FB- Doug

playing around with running rigging is the most fun part of boat work - i'd actually go so far as to say it's fun to do. Doesn't really cost that much to rig a boat from scratch, either. At least, not compared to travel, hotels, etc. 

The low boom can eat a bag of dicks though. I probably still have a scar on my head from a horribly placed outhaul cleat (i wouldn't have made it under the boom anyway on that tack but i hope whoever placed that cleat also got what was coming to them...)

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If you want to be COMFORTABLE while having fun,  so that you keep going out after the first thrashing,  find a Taser,  or a Wayfarer - both sail great.  While you might be a bit on the light side for serious competition,  a bit of extra room in the boat really helps if you are not going to be 100% race-focused in your time on the water- and,  well you're probably going to keep getting bigger.

Look at classes that have good couples teams (like the 2 above) and don't go with a full-race boat (fireball, 470, 505)  if you want to ease into the sport - just my 2 cents.

That Johnson 18 looks interesting - what are the prevailing conditions in-season where you are most-likely to sail the boat in the next 3 years ?

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and,  if you are both as speed-focused as the original post indicates,  you might wanna check out the local beach cat scene and see what's what there.

Good on you for doing something together.  My suggestions above are the result of watching so many get 'too' into performance sailing without being really ready for the demands, and then bailing on the sport in 2.3 seasons. 

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If you want something fun, fast and easy, have a look at a Weta Trimaran. It can be sailed solo or two-up (your combined weight is ideal for most conditions) but there's enough buoyancy for three if you want to take out friends. It's quick at over 20 knots downwind although very stable and hard to capsize - but easy to right if you do - plus there's no boom to take your head off.
There's two owners in the Houston area on the Weta World Map who I'm sure would give you a demo sail and you can pick them up used from US$5000.
There's also a Texas race circuit on the class association calendar https://www.wetanorthamerica.com/calendar. Plus Wetas are often used for marathon events and one entered the Texas 200 this year.

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8 hours ago, Pewit said:

If you want something fun, fast and easy, have a look at a Weta Trimaran. It can be sailed solo or two-up (your combined weight is ideal for most conditions) but there's enough buoyancy for three if you want to take out friends. It's quick at up to 15 knots downwind although very stable and hard to capsize - but easy to right if you do - plus there's no boom to take your head off.
There's two owners in the Houston area on the Weta World Map who I'm sure would give you a demo sail and you can pick them up used from US$5000.
There's also a Texas race circuit on the class association calendar https://www.wetanorthamerica.com/calendar. Plus Wetas are often used for marathon events and one entered the Texas 200 this year.

FIFY

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4 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

FIFY

Post #38 agrees

I think Sailingsubmarine has submerged. He and his mom sat in a 505 and neither of their feet reached the bottom of the boat. So they looked at a 470 and figured out quickly why they are hardly any left. He gave up on the thread...

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JY-15 or JY-15 Turbo.  The Turbo has a spinnaker and trapeze. The regular JY-15, if the newer style chainplates have been installed

can be rigged with a spinnaker.  Not as large a 'chute as the Turbo, but bigger than a 420.  And when you're not using the spinnaker you

can sail either in one design fleets.

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