nacradriver

DeBond It for 5200

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Has anyone used this stuff?  And if so, does it really work?

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I have used it on 4200. It works. Follow directions. Basically, spray, score, wait, score, spray, wait, ....

 

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I used it to pry off the amas of a 28' trimaran. It was a Jim Brown SeaClipper design and the crossbeams had 8" square pads at each end that sat on top of the hulls and then two 1/2" bolts down through the each beam end and deck with ample backing blocks and washers inside the hull. The builder had used 5200 when it first went together and he may as well have not even used the bolts! I had bought the boat in New Jersey and was trying to demount the boat to fit on a trailer to drive home to the Gulf Coast. May as well have just sailed it home for the effort and time it took to get the damned thing apart.

     I had already wedged and pried hoping that it was really 5200 but I could tell by the smell that it was truly the 3M product. I had heard long ago that when 3M was deciding on a name for their new wonder adhesive one of the engineers said that it had tested at 5200 lbs per sq in in lab tensile peel tests so that seemed good enough for marketing. 

    My prying was delaminating the epoxy fiberglass coating on the deck so I tried the Debond product. I would only work on the exposed layer at the edges so I bought a jobber length 1/8" drill bit and drilled along the 5200 line and then squirted using the little red pipe that came with the DeBond into the holes and let it sit a few minutes to soften up the adhesive. I must have drilled a hole from each side every 1/4" and still was making little headway. A hacksaw blade would soon gum up with the melted goop and I broke more than a few. I bought coarser Sawzall blades with a handle attachment and it was still a slow go. A guy saw me and dropped a Ryobi cordless knock off of a Sawsall and it didn't do much better other than relieve the strain on my shoulders. I had maybe three 18 volt batteries to cycle through but the cordless just didn't have the grunt for the job. 

      Finally I bought a wire saw like you see in survival kits and that got me part way through the first of the four pads before I broke it. I noticed the spiral wound survival saw built up enough heat that the DeBond was smoking and probably was acting more as a lubricant than anything else. DeBond isn't cheap and I was already pretty heavily invested with all the blade purchases and a fisherman watched and gave me a roll of heavy braided SS leader wire as my wiresaw got ever shorter as it broke at the rings that served as handles. My arms were starting to look like Popeye's and I finally had to come home for a couple of weeks before I could finish. 

    Back home I did some Google research and found that nichrome wire with electric current to heat the wire is what a lot of auto glass shops use so I intended to jury rig something like that up but I finally bought a real corded Ryobi reciprocating saw for less than the next three bottles of DeBond were going to cost and did a Samuri Salvor routine and blasted through the next three pads in an afternoon upon my return. It did damage the mating surfaces so I had to rebuild them and when I finally reassembled the tri at home I used cheap acrylic caulking but I doubt I will ever go through another demount nightmare! Anyone want to buy a nice aluminum dual axle trailer?

     Good luck with whatever you are demounting nacra.

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I used it to remove teak toerails from the side of my boat where the crew sits to hike out. I used steel guitar strings tied to a rope wound on a winch to cheesewire them off the deck. One click at a time, debond, wait, click, debond, wait, click..... Removed them with no damage to rails or deck - about 12 linear feet, in an afternoon. I don't know whether the debond did anything, but the rails are off.

 

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It works.  Expensive if you have to go through much area.  

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I’ve not used it on 5200, but it does work on  (Sika? and other goos). Use sparingly. 

CR Laurence, discussed in another thread, carries windshield glass handling products and they have some stuff that looks interesting: Sika-Slick

http://www.crlaurence.com/crlapps/showline/offerpage.aspx?ProductID=62288&GroupID=40477&History=30587:19747:19764:18004:19764&ModelID=40477&pom=0

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On 7/29/2018 at 7:58 PM, Wet Spreaders said:

I used it to remove teak toerails from the side of my boat where the crew sits to hike out. I used steel guitar strings tied to a rope wound on a winch to cheesewire them off the deck. One click at a time, debond, wait, click, debond, wait, click..... Removed them with no damage to rails or deck - about 12 linear feet, in an afternoon. I don't know whether the debond did anything, but the rails are off.

 

Hope your crew bought you a beer!

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8 hours ago, Slim said:

Hope your crew bought you a beer!

I don't give a shit about the beer so long as they hike harder.

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Gasoline also works to soften 5200.  Cheap, but flammable.

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