~HHN92~

Civil War Yacht - Chronicles of the Schooner America

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While stumbling around the internet the other day I found this book, which chronicles of the America and specifically the period during the Civil War when she was used by both sides. It was published in 2009 but I had never heard of it, has anyone else seen or read it?

I will report back when I have finished if there is no one who has read it.

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Cool, I've certainly never heard anything about that part of her history.....

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Haven't read it, but should have. Man, the AC and the American civil War, two of the most interesting things and of my hobbies combined. I need to have this book!!! Great find, @~HHN92~

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Through 120 pages, quirky writing and wording at times, basically going through the build and race so far. One item of lore refuted, that DeBalquiere cut the masts down after buying her, due to the bases being rotten. Several notations on how he did not touch anything during the first year of owning her, doing lots of cruising and some racing.

Several other tidbits in there, including that she arrived quietly in Savannah when she came back in 1861.

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I finished the book last night, it is an interesting read if you are in to history, especially if you have an interest in the America and the story of its lifespan. The book ends with its purchase by General Benjamin Butler, so the remainder of the story is left to other sources.

Once it was known to be in the service of the Confederacy the Union command, all the way up to Lincoln at one point, had an interest in getting her and then using her speed in the blockade of Charleston. Quite a bit of effort was put in to not creating any damage in the process of raising the America from being scuttled and to restore her to service. She was involved in quite a number of actions in the several years of her service, but was moved up north and finished the war around New York and Newport.

In the inaugural America's Cup race of 1870 she was under the command of a Navy officer but steered by the son of Dick Brown, who drove her originally back in 1851.

Again, the writing is a bit odd at times but the book does fill-in quite a few gaps in her history, a worthwhile read in my opinion.

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