redboat

Which Topside Paint?

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Interlux Perfection or Epifanes two part Poly-Urethane?

I "hear" Perfection is easier to apply but Epifanes is harder and offers a better finish.

 

While I'm at it....

Have another project requiring a single part paint. Always used interlux Brightside. Epifanes also offers a single part topside paint  called Mono-urethane that is "supposed"to be better.  Any  experience with both to offer a comparison.

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Only with Brightside. I couldn't have been happier with it - went on very smooth by brush with 5% Penetrol. Good gloss, lasted for years - still looked good when I sold the boat.

The only problem I saw was a couple of areas of "acne" - pinhead blisters - that showed up 2 or 3 years in. I suspected it was some moisture migration from the laminate.

 

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Brightside is a great product and easy to use. It just does not have the strength of a two part product. The two part is harder to apply with perfect results. It can be done by a good amateur. I am not a pro but painted the hull on one boat and the deck of another with great results. There is a learning curve, just be prepared to sand it out and start over. I used Awlgrip and it lasted for years.

My understanding is brightside will not retain its shine as long and will wear out faster if applied in a high traffic area. In my opinion the two part is worth the extra effort. But brightside will get you good results with much less effort and cost. 

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I'd say Perfection is 25% more difficult to apply, 3X more expensive, but 10X better once it's on.

However, the OP already knows 2-parts are great because the question is Perfection vs. Epifanes 2-part. On this I have no comparison but I've been very happy with Perfection, where even slight imperfection is still pretty darn good.

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well one seems an unknown factor and the other widely used with tons of application information... what are you trying to achieve?   you haven't said what you're painting.. what's on there now, how's it going to be prepped, how's it going to be applied.    plus a billion other factors going on..    you looking for cheaper costs? longer durability?  etc..

if you're going full on prep and paint, the difference in cost isn't going to be much different, after you buy all the incidentals. .   durability usually depends on prep..

as far as which is better, ephiphanes does pretty well with their varnishes etc..  I doubt they'd half ass it on their paint line, then again you never know what mgmt might be up to, to make money ..  probably subcontracted to one of the bigger boys..   i usually call manuf. tech support hotlines and ask a couple of questions..  sometimes you get a bored engineer and get all sorts of information..   ymmv  

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Brightsides is great if you like to paint.  You'll be painting again soon because it holds up about as well as house paint. 2-part polys last a LOT longer.  The trick to applying them is to not mix more than you can use in the time it takes to set - and that varies according to temperature and how you mix it, so you have to think ahead.  Prep for both is about the same, so you get to decide how much you like painting.   

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Doing 2 small boats.

First is a classic fiberglass rowboat that was never painted, just abused. Here I will use the 2 part paint

Second is a Tasar that had the worst Brightside paint job I have ever seen. Prep for that job had included a rotary sander that left crescent shaped gouges all over. I have already longboarded, filled and faired much of the damage. Because a single part paint had been used I'm told that a 2 part paint wouldn't be compatible. Most of the existing paint is off but getting ALL of it off will be next to impossible. I will prime prior to applying the finish coat (s).

Both small projects that I want to do right but they are both small enough so redoing won't be too difficult. I assume I will botch things up a couple of times.

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I believe Interlux's primer epoxy for Perfection can go over Brightsides.  The perfection can then go over that.  You'd need to prime anyway.

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Not sure about that, it doesn't go over their (1part) urethane varnishes. Sounds like a question for the International technical people. 

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There are primers you can use as an isolation layer between one pot and two pot paints, International has one, and I think Epifanes as well. Best is to contact the tech support of your favorite brand

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20 hours ago, redboat said:

Doing 2 small boats.

First is a classic fiberglass rowboat that was never painted, just abused. Here I will use the 2 part paint

Second is a Tasar that had the worst Brightside paint job I have ever seen. Prep for that job had included a rotary sander that left crescent shaped gouges all over. I have already longboarded, filled and faired much of the damage. Because a single part paint had been used I'm told that a 2 part paint wouldn't be compatible. Most of the existing paint is off but getting ALL of it off will be next to impossible. I will prime prior to applying the finish coat (s).

Both small projects that I want to do right but they are both small enough so redoing won't be too difficult. I assume I will botch things up a couple of times.

 

you weren't changing the sandpaper enough  or cheap sandpaper and thus pressing too hard.. have to let the machine float across and let the paper do the work.. if you're pressing down to get more removal , you gouge..

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3 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

you weren't changing the sandpaper enough  or cheap sandpaper and thus pressing too hard.. have to let the machine float across and let the paper do the work.. if you're pressing down to get more removal , you gouge..

Thanks. That  was the work of the previous owner that I am trying to undo. I learned my lesson 50 years ago when I took out my fathers drill, attached a circular pad and stopped after 30 seconds. Homey don't use no rotary sanders no mo.

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If the old paint was one part anything... Try an application of orange paint stripper. Apply with brush, wait, moist with pump sprayer and scrape. Hand sand resistant paint. The stripper will cost you less than all the pads and paper you will be using. Collect the scraped paint in plastic bag and drop off at toxic waste site. It will be better for your lungs too.

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My boat was redone with Awlgrip Majestic Blue in 2002. I can't say it still looks good, because I keep hitting it into things, but the places that didn't make contact with docks, other boats, R5 buoy, a mystery daymark in the fog somewhere near Richmond, crew buckles, lumps of wood and the coastguard RIB, look great.

As boat paint it's awesome. Would probably make crappy body armor.

 

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