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Myouri

J 105 Halyard

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Does anyone know if the spinnaker halyard goes behind the spreader bar or in front?

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Guess: Usually prebend is a big deal when tuning. As you bend the mast usually you tighten the uppers more than the lowers allowing the middle of the mast to bend forward (more than pulling the top back towards the stern). And spreaders are typically swept back/aft with spreader bars going through the mast that are usually in a wide vee/V shape. My guess would be either behind spreader bar (guessing there is more room back there and a straighter line up/down the mast with rake/bend) or with all the other halyards going to the front of the boat... 

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My guess is behind also. You could always choose to reeve the jib and kite when the mast is up - that removes all doubt. I use a messenger line with some nuts on it and a magnet on a stick to fish them through the mast exit hole.

 

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Behind.  Not seeing how it could be set up any other way.  Diagram please?

Any other lead seems fouled or f' up.

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Behind is the general consensus. I have the drawing from sparcraft which does not show the halyard feeds. I lost my spinnaker halyard recently and  drop a new one down the mast. On takedown the halyard is getting jammed and only upon release of main halyard doe it unjam. I going to re-feed  it as I am thinking last time it twisted with the main halyard.

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44 minutes ago, Myouri said:

I lost my spinnaker halyard recently and  drop a new one down the mast. On takedown the halyard is getting jammed and only upon release of main halyard doe it unjam. I going to re-feed  it as I am thinking last time it twisted with the main halyard.

Spin halyard can be a bit of a pain since it's above the hounds. First thing I'd do is loosen all the halyards and put a bunch of prebend in the mast. Tighten the uppers, loosen the lowers and put some backstay on. Then snug the halyards (and topper), then REALLY heel the boat over to starboard. Goal is to have the weight on the end of your chaser line slide down the aft starboard side of the mast and not just randomly swinging around inside the mast tube.

I usually slide a bunch (10-15) of nuts on the chaser line, tie the last one on, cut the tail off the knot (and burn it) then use a hot-glue gun and glue inside the top nut so it's up about 1/2" off the stack. This lets you bend the string of nuts down the sheave but you also don't have to deal with nuts sliding all the way up the chaser line while you are climbing or trying to feed. Some people put a loop around the top nut in the stack but I find that puts the weight off-center and it can snag/hang on things like spreader bars. Hot glue is nice because it keeps the chaser line string in the center of the nut stack. Good luck. 

P.S. You don't need electric or a glue gun. Just keep a couple sticks of hot glue (the thin sticks) in your rope/rigging tool box/bag. Use a lighter to heat the end of the glue stick and it'll work fine.

edit: haven't done any of this stuff in a long time but thinking back, that's how a sailmaker taught me to do it.

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For what it's worth, a short length of bicycle chain makes a great weight for your messenger line when feeding a new halyard. It's flexible - easily sliding over the sheave - and it's also magnetic - easy to pull out the exit hole with a magnet. The last two times I've had to use this, the bike shops have gladly just given it away ( a used chain has little value elsewhere apparently).

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If you actually straighten the stick, tighten the jib and main halyards the aperture for the spin is on the opposite of the main there really should be no problem.  

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49 minutes ago, proOC said:

If you actually straighten the stick, tighten the jib and main halyards the aperture for the spin is on the opposite of the main there really should be no problem.  

I agree - not rocket science. Chances are the main halyard is tight anyway if you have someone dangling from it feeding the halyard through. I have never had an issue with crossed halyards - keeping the others tight when you feed the new one is key to happiness.

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The magnet trick is awesome and really is the way to go. I have used this trick before. 

 

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I agree RATM...also what about it fouling the Jib halyard?

It leads to the same side (port) as the spin halyard so if there is no load on it it may dangle inside the mast and have a chance with fouling.

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The J/105 that I race on has a mast designed for 4 halyards, Main, spin, and two jibs. We only carry one jib halyard. The spin and jib halyards exit on the forward side of the mast and are stacked vertically with the spin halyard above the hounds. If you lead the halyards to the proper halyard exits, they should never even rub together let alone cross. We have our main and jib halyards exiting the port side and the spin halyard exiting to starboard.

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Same as us.  We do not have two sheaves for jib halyards though...We have run the spin to the starboard side sheaves and spinlock for a european rounding regatta and had no issues with that either....

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I think there would be some value in having your main halyard and jib halyard exiting the mast from different sides so that if you wanted to keep them on the winch drums going upwind, you could. I know that most J/105s use the cabin tops for sheeting the jib but...

I like having the spin halyard rigged on the "windward" side for hoisting.

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I have my main on port and jib and spinnaker on starboard. If halyards are in good shape they no not slip. You need to make sure the clutches are fully engage by pressing down on the cam with your fingers under the handle.

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