losjackal

Minor hull damage?

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Hi, just discovered this hull damage under our Capri 13 dinghy.  We are very surprised we didn't notice it when purchasing, and it's only been in the water once a few weeks ago.  Trying to figure out how this happened?  The rust stains are particularly vexing.

I guess this crack was there all along, and putting it in the water once exposed it.  I'm not sure if the boat isn't water tight anymore, but this looks like something I should fix.

So, what are the ways to fix this?  Any advice welcome.  I'm located in the Chicago suburbs so unless something is super easy, I'd probably need to find someone to repair it for me.

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Something is going on. Where on the boat is this located? Is it just a stress crack in the gel coat or damage to the fiberglass below?Is it somewhere you can see from the inside (inspection port)? To me it looks like an impact stress crack. If no damage to the glass below, take a small high speed grinding tool and open up the crack line. Just down to the fiberglass. Refill with thickened gel coat. Sand smooth with different grits of sand paper ending with 1000 or 1500 wet and dry, rubbing compound, polish and wax. Unless you are an expert or real artist, the color will not be a perfect match. But based on the age of most Capri 13's it might be real cost prohibitive to have an expert do the repair. It is not hard to do this and will look better than current situation. 

If cracked fiberglass that is a different repair. Access to the inside of the hull will determine the level of difficulty. Not that it is hard to repair, but if access is difficult, that is what will make it more complex. 

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It is on the starboard side closer to the front, certainly underneath and below waterline.  Agreed, looks like some kind of impact.  What's strange is we don't remember doing this the one time it's been in the water, and would have noticed this when purchasing.  I just wonder if it was a subtle crack and then something got exposed when in the water.

Thank you for the tips.  Yes, I'm wondering if I can fix this up "enough" myself for the time being...as you say, don't necessarily want to spend hundreds of dollars on professional repair for this little boat.  

Upon your advice, I took a closer look inside.  Yep, there's an inspection port.  Had to reach in and dodge the flotation things inside...this is about an arm's length away.  Ugh!  Can you make sense of this?

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Looks like a previous repair job.

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It is hard to say for sure but I think you might be looking at a previous repair that is failing. If that is the case then you need to grind out all the failing repair and redo. 

Lots of youtube vids but this one is on your sort / size of boat.

https://youtu.be/PzOMlMzrLoE

TOP TIP don't waste time trying to do a gel coat match. Buy a matching rattle can and mist on a few coats. 

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17 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Looks like a previous repair job.

Either that or a cowpie.

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Yeah, the patch looks evident. What’s all that protruding stuff?  Broken fiberglass that wasn’t cleaned out?

i haven’t mentioned that further front of the hull, there is a rectangular section (symmetric) that looked like a previous repair too.  But it is beige color and smoothly finished, like someone did a good job repairing something else.  Would they have cut a hole to repair this thing?  Hard to imagine, I’m just trying to figure out how this thing was fixed. 

Best case, this fiberglass repair is still watertight, and it’s just external gel coat damage?  If this can be fixed on the surface, then yes, the entire hull needs repainting. 

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12 minutes ago, losjackal said:

Best case, this fiberglass repair is still watertight, and it’s just external gel coat damage?  If this can be fixed on the surface, then yes, the entire hull needs repainting. 

If its not leaking then, yes, you can fill the cracks on the bottom, sand and repaint.  Should be fine.

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Looks like somebody tried to repair a hole by gluing a piece of glass on the outside wit PU expanding wood glue. there seems to be unsaturated glass in the middle of the repair...

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4 hours ago, Blitz said:

It's bleeding rust, gotta be some sort of metal in there.

I just had an awful thought.    I hope someone didn't think chicken-wire would make for great reinforcement in that area for the repair.  lol.   I just cant understand why rust would be weeping from that kind of damage.  Looks dry on the inside.   Weird.

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Sorry, ugly repair but at least you know you did not unknowingly do the damage.

My guess is a prior owner used a wire brush or steel wool to scuff up the existing glass prior to the repair and that left metal in the area to be repaired. It has now rusted and is weeping out. 

If you are lucky it will not be a good bond and you might be able to knock it off with a hammer and chisel. If not grind it down to the original fiberglass. If you grind you will have a good surface for bonding. If you are able to pop the old repair off. Sand the area really well with rough sandpaper, 60 grit or better. Clean the area really well, wipe down with acetone and you are ready to go. On that size boat, two layers of cloth placed on top of each other while still wet is probably good enough. 

Once dry tackle the gel coat from the exterior and you are done. Really not tough and I am sure there are lots of videos on line.

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Super helpful input so far, thank you all, especially SailMoore1 for starting this off!  I feel like I could tackle this particular spot with some time and elbow grease.  Might cost me some money ($50) in terms of supplies.

Perhaps a bigger concern is there is a soft, spongey spot on deck in the cockpit, with spider cracks.  Feels like if I put too much weight in that spot I could break through...?  Can I ask what is the repair process for something like this?   (Pretty sure it is reachable from the inspection port too.). Should I expect to lose that nice grippy pattern on top?

With these two issues combined, I'm inclined to try to pay a professional to fix them both at the same time.  (The starboard side even has this "cosmetic" crack which I'd think could be filled in somehow...again, not wanting to lose the grippy texture...)

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IMG_1940.jpg

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Losjackal, you are very welcome. I think it maybe time to think about the boat. 

While everything is repairable, the additional photos are a whole new game especially if you are considering professional repairs. Stress cracks in the nonskid with squishy surrounding area most likely means there is a core material in the deck that has become wet. That repair, plus the long crack in the rail and the one previously discussed could easily be way more than the value of the boat if done by a professional.

This is a Capri 13 that has has a lot of what appears to be hard use and some interesting repairs. Obviously she sails as you have had her out. Maybe you should just enjoy the boat for what it is and have fun sailing. 

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Yep, I’m glad to just enjoy it as-is if possible.  This is just a starter boat for me which we got for a good price but have spent a little money replacing missing pieces  

So in your opinion, what is the minimum I could do here?  Leave the crack as-is, avoid stepping on soft deck spot...but do what about the original hull picture?

 

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Fill the cracks, sand, paint, and go sailing.

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how much is this thing worth to you?  

 

Cut out the spongy spot to good core/foam (whatever) - replace foam  - glass over top.

 

Have a look here for examples of varying degrees of repair to dinghies: http://www.sail.ie/maint.htm

 

if its a starter boat - use it to learn repair techniques, too.  You can hardly do worse than that bogged patch

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I think Duncan has it right...its a starter boat, so use it to learn repair techniques as well.  West systems manuals are a great source of information.  Its not really rocket science.  Take your time, be methodical, and it'll likely turn out way better then what you've got now.

Its a Capri, so highly likely that the core in the cockpit sole is balsa.  I think balsa is a little easier to work with for a newbie DIYer, so would use balsa to recore...but that's just me....again, covered in detail in the West Manuals.  

Crack on the side of the hull, may or may not be "cosmetic", but for now, would follow Maui's advice.  Grind a shallow vee shape into the gelcoat, mix up some new grey colored gelcoat and put it in the crack.  Catalina probably will sell you grey gelcoat for an almost pretty good color match....

If, once you've gone sailing for a bit,  it opens up again after you fix it, then you'll know it wasn't just cosmetic, and will need to do more..

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On 9/12/2018 at 2:14 AM, duncan (the other one) said:

if its a starter boat - use it to learn repair techniques, too.  You can hardly do worse than that bogged patch

Amen, brother!

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in answer to the question "should I

On 9/11/2018 at 8:01 AM, losjackal said:

Should I expect to lose that nice grippy pattern on top? 

...again, not wanting to lose the grippy texture

You should expect to lose the grip pattern.  It's very difficult to replicate in a repair.  Sometimes you're better off sanding the whole area off and then painting on a new non-skid coating afterwards.

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