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17 minutes ago, Willin' said:

A long time ago, in a boatyard far, far away...

enhance

enhance

 

Wow! Beauty!! Looks like a really nice H-28 except of course LFH himself would not approve of the raised coachroof........... <shake finger>

I love-love-love the shape of this hull.

FB- Doug

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Yeah, I got that a lot!:D 

About the coach roof, that is.

She was a good old boat and my first hard lesson... think twice before buying an iron fastened wooden boat.

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On ‎1‎/‎19‎/‎2019 at 1:12 PM, CriticalPath said:

I've rounded MDI umpteen times during the LO300 over the past 30 years, but haven't been on the island since I was a kid in the 70s.  In those wonderful days the lighthouse was still manned and the keeper would come by the dock when recreation boats were in to see if anyone wanted to go for a bumpy Jeep ride to the west end of the island for a full tour of the lighthouse.  At that time there was still the shell of John Foster Dulles' summer retreat for exploring, along with the schoolhouse.  Any buildings still leftover east of the bay?

The main activity back then was commercial fishing.  There was an active commercial fleet based out of Long Point (at Point Traverse) and the boats'd all come in to Schoolhouse Bay to sort their catches - the sight of a 40' fishing trawler full to the gunnels with writhing live ell was a sight nobody would ever forget!  And the stench...

So what's access into the bay like now?  Could we get in to the dock (assuming there's space) with 6'+ draft?

Cheers!

 

I've gone around it a few times on 300's too.

Dulles house is still there, a bit of a death trap to poke about in but possible. A few buildings at School house bay and some ruins.

School house bay is 6'4" on a good day in a good year. In that shot the keel was on the bottom, that was as close as we could get to the dock. Other years I can get right in past the inner floating dock. it's a pretty tight fit for us to get in there. Conditions inform my decision to try and jam it in there.

The "outside bay" is cool though. A few years ago we stumbled over a 110' ship wreck of a steamer in 12'. So now we try to snorkel that when we are in the area. The deck and machinery are gone but the whole hull is largely there, fallen open. you can still see all the iron ribs and wood planks which must be 4" thick.

A lot of fisherman jet out for day excursions to fish the drop off, lots of structure around the island. Sometimes brave campers make it out there too.

For us its kind of a mandatory stop off en route from Toronto to the islands. It's the first place the kids want to see. Tons of frogs and snakes to chase. We spent hours playing with a family of 15 snapping turtles this year.

 

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I just realized that I can maybe win this thread.  It used to be mine but is no more and here she is definitely NOT sailing.  Normal tidal range there is about 6 inches. 

28515991_2003355289995193_2006184646691501433_o.jpg

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Russ,

 

I think this one is better, taken Jan 10 of Breezy Girl stuck in the mud. I think I could push that beached tri Lola back into the water. No way your moving this boat. Have you posted a picture of your new boat?

 

Breezy Girl.jpg

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Waiting to go out.  We ignore the golf course next door. 

Eclipse starboard side 2018.jpg

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11 hours ago, Breezy Girl said:

Russ,

 

I think this one is better, taken Jan 10 of Breezy Girl stuck in the mud. I think I could push that beached tri Lola back into the water. No way your moving this boat. Have you posted a picture of your new boat?

 

Breezy Girl.jpg

Where was this taken?

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@Breezy Girl - The only "Breezy Girl" I know is actually a horse but even with a horse there was no way Lola was moving that day.  And I got pics of the new boat not sailing but have not posted them yet. Maybe when she gets here hopefully next week (just in time for the deep freeze).  :(

@Ajax- I don't know where that is but I sure hope it has a lifting rudder and keel or its gonna be a mess.

 

 

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Location is Marley Creek and the boat has a centerboard so it draws 2'-4" when retracted. The rudder pivots on a skeg that is designed to support the stern when on the hard and there are two fin shaped bilge keels that keep the boat from rolling on its side. I need over 1.5' of tide to back out into the channel and I am able to slide her through the pudding into that spot in less than 1' of tide height. Great low cost solution for gunk holing on the Chesapeake.

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Well then get that lead sled outta there.  That mud belongs to a local multihull skipper and multiple line honors record holder.  Sadly, last I hear he had lost his mind and descended into proa lunacy!? :P

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Lovely looking boat, dreadful conditions. Is it being moved to a new home?

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Thanks. Not so bad, think it might have been in the seventies that day. Yes, moved to LA

--Lower Alabama

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On 9/15/2018 at 8:01 AM, Sail4beer said:

Kind of like the old drug running boat in the Florida Keys. They’d pump it out at night, blowtorch the deisel to melt the wax in the cylinders, fire it up and make the run. Sun up comes and the boat goes back down!

Seems like it would still be very visible to the airborne enforcers... unless they also had a full camo tarp...

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They ran drugs at night. They’d go out and meet fast boats from Miami in the dark and had it back, unloaded and the boat sunk by dawn.  It was the 80’s and 90’s. 

I also knew people that had accidentally relocated to the Keys when their drug boats would hit the shallows and they’d have to get the drugs offloaded and then they never went home because it was so nice there.

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On 1/25/2019 at 7:53 PM, rstone said:

P6140145 (Medium).JPG

Chuck Paine's Annie design?

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Yes, it's a Morris Annie and Chuck Paine's very close interpretation of Ralph Winslow's 1942 design "Four-Sum"

Winslow Foursum.jpg

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One of my favorite boats. Impervious to lobster pots in Maine as well.

6534100_20171116122045060_1_XLARGE.jpg

6534100_20171116122003841_1_XLARGE.jpg

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18 hours ago, rstone said:

Yes, it's a Morris Annie and Chuck Paine's very close interpretation of Ralph Winslow's 1942 design "Four-Sum"

 

A lovely boat. How will a boat with her draft do in L.A?

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With exception of the shipping channel, Mobile Bay is fairly shallow --9 to12 feet above mud and sand with little tide. Gunkholing to neighboring waters I guess about the same. Gulf of Mexico is a bit deeper.  Nothing around here compares with the beauty of Maine's coast. The lobster pots, I wouldn't be too  concerned with but granite ledges lurking under the water....bad juju.

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10 hours ago, kdh said:

One of my favorite boats. Impervious to lobster pots in Maine as well.

6534100_20171116122045060_1_XLARGE.jpg

6534100_20171116122003841_1_XLARGE.jpg

This might be an embarrassing question, but is Sail4Beer's boat linked to this in any way? Designer or builder? The topdecks look very similar.  

They're very pretty boats, something about them is really pleasing to the eye.

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Chilling in a blue space. 

5A1D4D63-B453-47F9-ABBB-55F26384EEC9.jpeg

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My boat was designed by  Whitham T. Bailey and built in 1949 for the Newport Bermuda race. I noticed some similarity in deck camber when saw this one. Mine appears to have more-a lot more than I see in other boats.

It’s in wet storage for the winter with bubblers and a lot of eyes. There was ice around it yesterday and the bilge was dry. 

D2A717F1-75E3-4D0E-9292-6D362BC2C063.jpeg

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We used to love sleeping in the cockpit  on those warm, dry So. Cal. nights. 

enhance

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On 1/31/2019 at 9:24 AM, kdh said:

One of my favorite boats. Impervious to lobster pots in Maine as well.

6534100_20171116122045060_1_XLARGE.jpg

 

I beg to differ with you. I thought my boat was impervious too, until my first Eggemoggin Reach Regatta. Dead calm, zero vis fog, the whole fleet riding the ebb out of the reach at about 2 kts when we slammed on the brakes. Took a pot buoy through the aperture. We managed to snag the warp with a boat hook but couldn't free it, too much pressure. I was just putting on my bathing suit while the crew dropped the sails when it popped free by itself, thank God.

Now I steer to avoid lobster pots very aggressively. Unfortunately, my wife- not so much.

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2 hours ago, Willin' said:

We used to love sleeping in the cockpit  on those warm, dry So. Cal. nights. 

enhance

True. Altogether too few new(er) boats take that into consideration when designing the cockpit. I haven't been on a boat newer than the early 80's that had cockpit seats long enough to sleep on.

I'm sure they are out there but I ain't been on one. Old Cals - even the 20 - were superb in that regard.

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I hear there are still racing fleets of Cal 20s out there in the north west. 

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Heyyyy, Willin... Regards to you.

Photo:High tide at south minerva reef in 17. A little bit bumpier there than north minerva.

FB_IMG_1508362741966.jpg

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2 hours ago, JBE said:

Heyyyy, Willin... Regards to you.

Photo:High tide at south minerva reef in 17. A little bit bumpier there than north minerva.

FB_IMG_1508362741966.jpg

Say hey there JB!  Great to see you!

Any chance you'll be floating Waione any time soon?

 

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Not really , but  I have a son very keen, might take a while.. just graduated and started work .She's safe where she is.

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12 hours ago, JBE said:

Not really , but  I have a son very keen, might take a while.. just graduated and started work .She's safe where she is.

Yeah, Drift has been out for two years now. I'm trying to get her recaulked this winter/ spring and back in the water by June. I'm missing sailing but running out of steam on all the maintenance.

Hoping to be in Auckland for the AC in 21. Maybe see ya then.

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TONIC, my H-Boat, is going back in the water on Valentine's Day, after a two-month spa visit. The weather for the rest of the month is cold showers, in other words, not sailing. I will spare you the pics.

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What is your wife going to be doing that day? ;)

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10 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

What is your wife going to be doing that day? ;)

Babysitting one of our grandchildren.

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You are a true romantic Bull. :D

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Hi All just posted this elsewhere on the site discussing trailer sailers for cruising. Thought it might interest some here under this heading. My mate and I were actually sleeping on board way out in the middle of the Australian desert a really long way from water back on an across Australia 3 day transit tow from Perth WA to Kangaroo Valley NSW in September last year.

Regards Graeme 

C70964AA-EE24-4237-AF01-77147B661EBD.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Grith said:

Hi All just posted this elsewhere on the site discussing trailer sailers for cruising. Thought it might interest some here under this heading. My mate and I were actually sleeping on board way out in the middle of the Australian desert a really long way from water back on an across Australia 3 day transit tow from Perth WA to Kangaroo Valley NSW in September last year.

Regards Graeme 

C70964AA-EE24-4237-AF01-77147B661EBD.jpeg

OMFG!  Back around 1981 I was young, dumb, injured and unemployed and took a job delivering MacGregors from Costa Mesa, CA to the East. The gig was they'd give you $200 cash, load 4 boats on a POS  end of life truck with a 55 MPH limiter towing a POS end of life trailer. Every other day or so you had to call the office and arrange to have another $200 wired to you. If you ran out of money on Friday and didn't get to a phone in time, tough shit till Monday.

You slept in the boats on the way East and in the truck or on the ground on the way back. Pay was $.06/ mile based on their mileage tables, not reality, so mostly I filled a cooler with lunch meats, bread and beer and had a great if hot, sweaty and quiet trip... no radios or entertainment in the trucks and got very little pay in return.

I did it one whole summer, delivering boats from Maine to Florida to interior Texas. Never once paid for a hotel. Took my GF with me on one trip where we got frozen in Niagara Falls, rained on while sleeping on a picnic table somewhere in the midwest, had to crash on the floor of a laundramat another night because we couldn't afford the $6 to camp in a KOA and slept on the ground under the truck in a roadside turnout in Vegas.

She still married me.

Good times!

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Hi Willin Tough gig! Ours was just two best mates from ten years old doing a couple of year catch-up road trip in air conditioned comfort, trying to solve the problems of the world, listening to talking books and at times forgetting we had 3.1 ton of yacht hanging on the back end of the car which was helped by modern electro hydralic brakes with stainless discs and calipers and an in car brake control for the trailer. A big difference from what you faced back then. Regards Graeme

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23 minutes ago, Grith said:

Hi Willin Tough gig! Ours was just two best mates from ten years old doing a couple of year catch-up road trip in air conditioned comfort, trying to solve the problems of the world, listening to talking books and at times forgetting we had 3.1 ton of yacht hanging on the back end of the car which was helped by modern electro hydralic brakes with stainless discs and calipers and an in car brake control for the trailer. A big difference from what you faced back then. Regards Graeme

Sounds like an epic trip, Graeme!

No disrespect intended, but did I mistake your boat ? It sure looks like a Mac 26 to me, but 3.1 tons seems a bit, um, overballasted. On the other hand, your roadtrip sounds a bit more fun than my summer of sweating and singing to the clouds and birds.

Here's the only pic I could dredge up from that summer, long before the Mac 26 hit the water, but equally, shall we say,  not exactly superyacht like. Notice the truck, purchased from a national rental fleet when they deemed it no longer trustworthy, the trailer, even less so.

enhance

 

Cheers!

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Hi Willin Not over ballasted just a whole lot bigger and mine fitted with the huge inboard diesel engine option and built way tougher than the very lightly built Mac's on their equally lightly built trailers. Over here in Australia most of the Mac trailers are replaced or rebuilt as they are very light. The Australian delivered Imexus 28's are also fitted with an extra 165 kgs of lead ballast as well as the 730 liters of water ballast in recognition of the harsher conditions here. The factory offer this as an option in Europe I believe and it is part of the Cat B from Cat C classification upgrade.

Whilst inspired by the 26x and m Macs The European Imexus28  and Australian built MACH28 are significantly bigger and more capable yachts but are therefore much bigger units to tow. Regards Graeme

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Celebrated warmer temps and later twilight the other evening by cranking the engine and testing all the new LEDs.  While it may be poor form to have running lights, deck, steaming AND anchor light all on at once ...at the dock...I was thoroughly enjoying that they all in fact were lit. After the engine was warm and the IPA was drained, it was time to go home 

image.png.3c779161048c0c5e68ee0715425ecb75.png

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On 2/13/2019 at 12:02 AM, Willin' said:

Here's the only pic I could dredge up from that summer, long before the Mac 26 hit the water, but equally, shall we say,  not exactly superyacht like.

Willin', you're lookin' awfully Seventies.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

Willin', you're lookin' awfully Seventies.

Stayin' Alive!

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The red does look sharp against the snow, though.

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18 hours ago, TheDragon said:

TanzerFrozen2014.JPG

I thought I did well with a pic of my old boat high and dry in its slip but Sir, you win the thread hands down. 

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Man, that's harsh.

We only had a few days of ice on the Chesapeake this year.

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The worst part @Ajax is that I still ain't sailing the new one.... !>?!?%$@$#$!@*()&%$#!@#

file-54.jpeg

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20 hours ago, TheDragon said:

TanzerFrozen2014.JPG

so the tanzer 22(?) is your boat and you and the mac 26 owner down the way leave the boats in the water and let them freeze in?  where are you?  that looks like real winter... canada, michigan, wisconsin or similar...real ice, feet thick...you don't sustain damage to the rudder, keel?

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Chester, this is central Illinois and I've left my boats in every year for the past 15 years (previously an Oday 23, now this Tanzer 22). No problems even with ice more than a foot thick like this. About 10 of us do that, only one boat has sunk and I am not sure it was the fault of the ice. My boat is always bone dry in the spring. And sometimes we have a warm ice-free winter and I get to sail on warm days, which is fun. I've even gotten to sail through the ice breaking up in the spring, but it is already all gone this spring.

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32 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Chester, this is central Illinois and I've left my boats in every year for the past 15 years (previously an Oday 23, now this Tanzer 22). No problems even with ice more than a foot thick like this. About 10 of us do that, only one boat has sunk and I am not sure it was the fault of the ice. My boat is always bone dry in the spring. And sometimes we have a warm ice-free winter and I get to sail on warm days, which is fun. I've even gotten to sail through the ice breaking up in the spring, but it is already all gone this spring.

In other news:

Image result for connecticut boat sinks cove

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Cleaned her bum this weekend. Interesting experience leaning her over on the tide, bit nerve wracking. 

mHGU5hv.jpg

AWeBHVk.jpg

ed9AlDj.jpg

 

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^^ I stopped by the marina to check on my boat yesterday evening and noticed that the Catalina 22 in the next slip was in danger of sinking.  I have never seen the owner of that boat, and it doesn't seem to have received much recent maintenance.  We've had a considerable amount of rain during the past week, and the cockpit of the Catalina 22 was full of water.  The cockpit had probably already overflowed into the cabin via the companionway.  I bailed most of the water out the cockpit with a bucket and then managed to clear enough of decayed leaves and other debris out of the cockpit drains that the remaining water was able to slowly drain away.  The cockpit drains seem to be connected to a single pipe that drains through a single outlet in the bottom or perhaps the centerboard trunk.  It seems to clog easily.  Another boatowner and I bailed out the same boat once before.

I wonder if I am incurring some liability by bailing the water out of someone else's boat?

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4 minutes ago, captain_crunch said:

^^ I stopped by the marina to check on my boat yesterday evening and noticed that the Catalina 22 in the next slip was in danger of sinking.  I have never seen the owner of that boat, and it doesn't seem to have received much recent maintenance.  We've had a considerable amount of rain during the past week, and the cockpit of the Catalina 22 was full of water.  The cockpit had probably already overflowed into the cabin via the companionway.  I bailed most of the water out the cockpit with a bucket and then managed to clear enough of decayed leaves and other debris out of the cockpit drains that the remaining water was able to slowly drain away.  The cockpit drains seem to be connected to a single pipe that drains through a single outlet in the bottom or perhaps the centerboard trunk.  It seems to clog easily.  Another boatowner and I bailed out the same boat once before.

I wonder if I am incurring some liability by bailing the water out of someone else's boat?

That's awfully nice of you to do a thing like that. My hat's off to you, Captain.

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^^ I had some concern for my own boat.  If the Catalina 22 had sunk, she might have pulled over one of the pilings my boat was moored to, or she might have listed over and tangled her shrouds with the shrouds of my boat.

When I purchased my first sailboat, a 23' Sea Sprite, I had her hauled out for bottom painting.  The boat next to her in the yard was a Catalina 22 that had sunk.  I watched the owner drag out the soggy cushions and other saturated gear.  What a mess!

The cockpit of my Sea Sprite did fill with rainwater once due to clogged cockpit drains.   The marina owner called me because he had noticed that she had a severe bow-up trim.  The trim actually prevented any water overflowing into the cabin, so no damage was done.

 

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Here’s Horse Chicks high and dry. 

Mother Nature’s short haul!!!

Winds 45-60+ her out of the Yesterday. The bow resting in its low water bow slot. Nice to have a 1” stainless bowguard

1382F68E-D73A-4C5F-B964-2B7AA962DD97.jpeg

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3 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

In other news:

Image result for connecticut boat sinks cove

I don't have a pic, but in early December, we had an early spell of cold weather. A 30-footer in our marina mostly sunk in the slip. It was awash. The marina owner donned his dry suit, and he and his crew were able to pump it out. Turned out the owner did not winterize, and left the seacock on the raw water intake/strainer open. The water in the glass thingy froze, the glass cracked, and you know the rest. 

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8 hours ago, chester said:

so the tanzer 22(?) is your boat and you and the mac 26 owner down the way leave the boats in the water and let them freeze in?  where are you?  that looks like real winter... canada, michigan, wisconsin or similar...real ice, feet thick...you don't sustain damage to the rudder, keel?

I sure am picking up some new tricks this off season on the internet. 

Who knew that hauling my boat out every season for the last 30/40 years was a complete waste of time and money? This, and those goddamn bowlines. Should've never wasted my time learning to tie one with one hand. Apparently there's a way better way to attach your jib sheets so they don't get caught on your shrouds when you tack. 

Some seriously hot tips. I'm gonna do things differently next year...for sure.

....o.k. In all seriousness. If you wanted to do this with a tinner(what we call an aluminum outboard runabout up here in the GWN) that had above the waterline thru-hulls on the transom, and you winterized the two-stroke outboard, well go for it. Not much to lose anyway. What's the total net loss on a Catalina 22 with an outboard anyway? 2K? I'm not sure what the thru-hull situation is with this boat so, hey whatever, I won't comment, as I have seen ice push boats up and stay put w/o breaking the hull. 

Here's what I CAN comment on from a Great Lakes haul out every six months  or so perspective. I'll keep my boat in the water until the bitter end every Fall, usually late November, when I finally admit to myself that, yes, winter in fact will be coming around again. I generally know that the water temp will moderate the temp that my inboard diesel sees, to about -4C air temp. That's about the time to freak out. I'll use a heater, or lamp and generally make an effort to run the engine every day or so. If I get caught, and it looks like an early deepfreeze, I'll winterize the engine at the slip, and have it towed for haul out in the next couple of days or whatever. One less thing to worry about while I wrap things up and put the boat cover frame on while she's still in the water(way easier)

As far as a thin sheet of ice, not worried about it. What I am worried about is water splashing up into the thru--hulls at or around freezing temp, and forming a wall and then a block of ice up inside an open thru-hull. This has happened to me once and I spent more than a few nervous hours with a hair dryer melting the ice inside a couple of thru-hulls. Once was more than enough. 

image.thumb.jpeg.b027fa55a308ee739160d17de767109f.jpeg

 

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^^ Nice looking boat fufkin. Glad you take good care of her.

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No thru holes in my boats, so the ice cannot damage them that way, and no water in the bilge, so ice cannot form there. The ice does lift or squeeze the boat out of the water a bit at the bow, and depending on where the boat is positioned when it freezes, usually at night when around O degrees F and I am not around to check it, one set of dock lines is taut. No hull or rudder damage, and no blistering or other issues.

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15 hours ago, Bull City said:

^^ Nice looking boat fufkin. Glad you take good care of her.

Thanks Bull, coming from a guy with your eye, it's appreciated.

 

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14 hours ago, TheDragon said:

No thru holes in my boats, so the ice cannot damage them that way, and no water in the bilge, so ice cannot form there. The ice does lift or squeeze the boat out of the water a bit at the bow, and depending on where the boat is positioned when it freezes, usually at night when around O degrees F and I am not around to check it, one set of dock lines is taut. No hull or rudder damage, and no blistering or other issues.

Hey TheDragon, as I mentioned, I can see how it would work w no thru-hulls, and now that I look more closely, a transom hung rudder. Another place where ice/water is a problem is on in board rudders where ice/water can get into where the rudder post goes into the rudder/or the hull and freeze thaw. In some cases, the rudder has to be drilled and drained. 

Every deal is different, and if the Tanzer 22 takes a lick'in and keeps on tick'in then that's that. A buddy of mine who sails with me from time to time used to have a Tanzer 22 in the Bronx. He'd take the subway with his bicycle, ride to his mooring, and spend weekends messing around on his 'urban cottage'. To me, that always sounded like a win when it came to the max enjoyment minimal hassle part of the boat ownership equation. 

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My soon to be boat and retirement home, closing in 6 days.  After 30 yrs of slaving at a desk to pay for my kids schooling and saving for their college, susidizing my ex, and sailing on other people's boats, the admiral and I finally get to play. woohoo!

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On 2/27/2019 at 8:52 PM, Bull City said:

^^ Nice looking boat fufkin. Glad you take good care of her.

 

On 2/27/2019 at 8:52 PM, Bull City said:

^^ Nice looking boat fufkin. Glad you take good care of her.

Hey Bull. Tried to PM you. The pantry is full.

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49 minutes ago, bgytr said:

My soon to be boat and retirement home, closing in 6 days.  After 30 yrs of slaving at a desk to pay for my kids schooling and saving for their college, susidizing my ex, and sailing on other people's boats, the admiral and I finally get to play. woohoo!

G40-1.png

Congratulations! Beautiful boat.

 

Need crew?

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last year we launched the boat after 6,5 year build. We had to inspect the daggerboard because it did stuck the last part, after a little sanding it fit perfectly.

 

thriller 1.JPG

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3 hours ago, T sailor said:

Nice!!!  Congrats!  Is that a little harbor 38?  

Thanks! bigger sister, Gulfstar 40, Hood design.   needs some tlc, 3 year plan to fixing her up.

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10 hours ago, bmiller said:

Congratulations! Beautiful boat.

 

Need crew?

thx..

not yet for crew, still got some work to do 

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11 hours ago, bgytr said:

My soon to be boat and retirement home, closing in 6 days.  After 30 yrs of slaving at a desk to pay for my kids schooling and saving for their college, susidizing my ex, and sailing on other people's boats, the admiral and I finally get to play. woohoo!

G40-1.png

Sounds like a well-earned treasure. Congratulations and enjoy!

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8 hours ago, bgytr said:

Thanks! bigger sister, Gulfstar 40, Hood design.   needs some tlc, 3 year plan to fixing her up.

Great boat! They look wonderful and also sail very well. 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

Great boat! They look wonderful and also sail very well. 

ya, the family had one when I was growing up, it's the first boat I was looking to buy.  My old man won a room full of trophies with the Gulfstar 40, and we cruised it extensively as a family.  Comfy ride, and fairly fast, not so much by today's standards, but fast enough for cruising, and the 4ft draft with the board up is great. 

Getting one and restoring to new condition is a bit of a religious quest ..

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9 hours ago, mowgli said:

last year we launched the boat after 6,5 year build. We had to inspect the daggerboard because it did stuck the last part, after a little sanding it fit perfectly.

 

thriller 1.JPG

More photos, please?

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2 hours ago, bgytr said:

ya, the family had one when I was growing up, it's the first boat I was looking to buy.  My old man won a room full of trophies with the Gulfstar 40, and we cruised it extensively as a family.  Comfy ride, and fairly fast, not so much by today's standards, but fast enough for cruising, and the 4ft draft with the board up is great. 

Getting one and restoring to new condition is a bit of a religious quest ..

That exactly why we got our boat.

I have the baby sister to your boat; the somewhat more homely Hood 38. I bought mine because my step-father had a Bristol 38.8 and the design seemed such a good cruising platform for my wife and I.

We bought ours in 2010 and have been rebuilding it since; much to much money and time; but, they are easy to sail to their rating and easy to handle.

We cruise Maine which is mostly a light air venue, so light air performance matters and the shoal draft opens up a lot of anchorages. 

 

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8 hours ago, Elegua said:

That exactly why we got our boat.

I have the baby sister to your boat; the somewhat more homely Hood 38. I bought mine because my step-father had a Bristol 38.8 and the design seemed such a good cruising platform for my wife and I.

We bought ours in 2010 and have been rebuilding it since; much to much money and time; but, they are easy to sail to their rating and easy to handle.

We cruise Maine which is mostly a light air venue, so light air performance matters and the shoal draft opens up a lot of anchorages. 

 

the Waquiez?  good boat...

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On 3/9/2019 at 12:17 PM, bgytr said:

Thanks! bigger sister, Gulfstar 40, Hood design.   needs some tlc, 3 year plan to fixing her up.

I've always loved the look of that boat and the 4 foot draft is very handyman. I'm envious 

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On 3/9/2019 at 12:10 PM, mowgli said:

last year we launched the boat after 6,5 year build. We had to inspect the daggerboard because it did stuck the last part, after a little sanding it fit perfectly.

 

thriller 1.JPG

Very nice!   I am not sailing yet either (middle of major refit) but am at least floating with the mast pointed at the sky!

file-66.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Wess said:

Very nice!   I am not sailing yet either (middle of major refit) but am at least floating with the mast pointed at the sky!

 

Wess my boat did sail a hole season, you can see it with the must up in the tread, the max speed we did was 21 kn. We had to get used to the speed. In April its getting in the water again.

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10 hours ago, py26129 said:

I've always loved the look of that boat and the 4 foot draft is very handyman. I'm envious 

thanks mon.. but you prob won't be envious of all the grinding, sanding, etc. that I gotta do in the near term!  Better than sitting at a desk tho...

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On 3/11/2019 at 6:40 AM, bgytr said:

thanks mon.. but you prob won't be envious of all the grinding, sanding, etc. that I gotta do in the near term!  Better than sitting at a desk tho...

I might be sick in the head, but that sounds like a certain amount of fun. Certainly you will be happy with the end result. 

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That's a nice looking boat there, tunesb.

I can't make out the name? 

Coo-coo-ka-choo?  Like from the Beatle's song?

CoCoCoCoCoCo?

There must be a story there.  

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