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JBoater

Newer J80 Crazing

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Looking at a 2012 J80, built by US Watercraft.  Some significant gelcoat cracking where the companionway meets the deck?  Haven't seen this kind of cracking, even on 15+ year old boats.

This is the only area where I saw any cracking in the gelcoat.  Is this just cosmetic or is their an underlying structural issue.  Boat was not sailed hard.

Is their a build quality difference between TPI build and US Watercraft built boats?  What are your thoughts?

Thanks

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First guess, as it's on both sides I'd say that it likely is that it indeed is an underlying structural issue.  How serious is harder to say.  Also I also realize It still could just be that US Watercraft got the gelcoat way too thick in those areas and the underlying structure is fine...

Helpful, wasn't I?:blink:

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Could also be an issue releasing from the mould. This can cause micro cracking in the gelcoat which with shrinkage over time leads to much worse looking cracks. In these pics if the coach roof didn’t want to release and the gunnels were being wedged out of the mold then this is where most if the damage would occur.

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Give Waterline a call.  I thought those hulls and decks were built in china and only assembled by US Watercraft.  I have a 2004 J/22 built by US Watercraft and it has zero crazing or cracking.

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Unless you are getting some super deal, I would stay away from one full of that stuff...I had two J22's and one of them had lines like that all over the place....I've heard of people dremeling them out and repairing and then it comes back later.....don't forget that one day you will want to resell and a new buyer will be right where you are today....and everyone wants a big price reduction for something where there are unlimited opinions about its cause....jmo

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Doesn't look like a gelcoat issue to me. too much gelcoat usually results in "spider cracking" and doesn't usually have a discernable pattern to the cracks. I had an Irwin which were notorious for too thick gelcoat topsides that was covered in spider cracks, but nothing that looked like that. It also usually takes a long tome (many years) to develop cracks that look like that, but I guess 6 years is enough time.

I also don't believe that it is a mold release issue. Mild release issues happen when not enough mold release wax is applied to the mold and the gelcoat gets stuck to the actual mold. This does not cause cracks, it literally rips the gelcoat off the fiberglass when the mold is taken off the hull. Not a huge deal, it happens, and is fixed immediately. No one on their right mind would take delivery of  a new boat with a section of bare fiberglass showing.

Do you know the boat wasn't sailed hard? Do you know the boat or is that what the broker told you.

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I forgot to mention I had a Cape Dory 22 that was full of spider cracking that shows up in most Cape Dory sailboats....In the nonskid areas I would coat the Interlux Interdeck nonskid paint....about every two-three yrs I would have to go over it again as the spiders came back....Interdeck is a good product but too soft....the spider cracking is a lot less in nature than the cracks I see in your pictures....also if water gets in there and you are in a colder climate that could freeze and really create problems if not fixed

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Boat has been within 60 miles of here her entire life.  That's how I know the history and not raced/sailed hard.  

Thanks everyone for your insight.  Any additional comments, please send them along.

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