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Life Jacket Recommendations

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Over the winter I am getting my Schock 35 ready to do some of the Lake Ontario Offshore races, specifically the Lake Ontario 300. I know I need to update my personal life jacket and was looking at something along the lines of the Spinlock Deckvest 5D. Does anyone have any recommendations on a good inflatable that would fit these rules or have any opinions of the 5D? I am also looking for recommendations for non-inflatable jackets that could be kept on the boat in case a crew member needs one that fits the rules or has an inflatable that fails. I don't necessarily care about USCG approval, as I will have others on the boat that fit the bill. I would rather have a safer NON USCG approved life jacket than wear a less safe approved one. Thanks in advance.

Each crew member shall have:

5.01 Lifejacket

5.01.1 Each crew member shall have personal flotation device which shall: A lifejacket shall:

a) i

if manufactured before 2012 comply with ISO 12402 - 3 (Level 150) or equivalent, including EN 396 or UL 1180 and:
Sail Canada prescribes that the words "if manufactured before 2012" above are deleted and that 5.01.1 a) ii, below, is deleted in its entirety.

• if inflatable have a gas inflation system

• have crotch/thigh straps (ride up prevention system (RUPS))
ii if manufactured after 2011 comply with ISO 12402-3 (Level 150) and be fitted with a

whistle, lifting loop, reflective material, automatic/manual gas inflation system and:

• crotch/thigh straps (ride up prevention system (RUPS))

LOOR strongly recommends that lifejackets meet 5.01.1 a) ii above but prescribes that vest or suspender-type lifejackets in accordance with UL 1180 are acceptable for 5.01.1 a) ii. Crotch strap(s) / thigh straps that are functionally equivalent to ISO 12401 will be accepted.

Sail Canada note - ISO 12402 is not currently approved by Transport Canada

  1. b)  have an emergency position indicating light in accordance with either ISO 12402-8 or SOLAS LSA code 2.2.3

  2. c)  be clearly marked with the boat’s or wearer’s name

  3. d)  have a sprayhood in accordance with ISO 12402-8

f) if inflatable, regularly checked for air retention
Unless otherwise specified by a boat’s applicable class rules or by sailing instructions, personal flotation devices shall have at least 150 N (34 #) buoyancy, arranged to securely suspend an unconscious man face upwards at approximately 45° to the water surface.

 

 

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I wonder if the bigger problem with GL sailing is cold water shock from hitting the water head first (MOBs don't fall in feet first, like in testing). They go 6 feet under water (vest not yet inflated), gasp a lungful, and ...

Not much data because it is too dangerous to test.

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Just now, thinwater said:

I wonder if the bigger problem with GL sailing is cold water shock from hitting the water head first (MOBs don't fall in feet first, like in testing). They go 6 feet under water (vest not yet inflated), gasp a lungful, and ...

Not much data because it is too dangerous to test.

How do you go 6 feet under water? Certainly not with foul weather gear. I couldn't even get submerged a few inches when trying to deploy my HIT pfd.

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16 minutes ago, chinzw said:

How do you go 6 feet under water? Certainly not with foul weather gear. I couldn't even get submerged a few inches when trying to deploy my HIT pfd.

I was thrown overboard off leward side and went at least 5 to six feet deep before inflatable mustang popped and then I came bobbing to surface like a rocket.  Thinking on the way down...I had a lot of time to think as time slows...that I should have practiced manual inflation in a pool.  I think the guy in the Mackinac race probably had the same thought.   I was not in full foulies..jjust salopettes.

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19 minutes ago, chinzw said:

How do you go 6 feet under water? Certainly not with foul weather gear. I couldn't even get submerged a few inches when trying to deploy my HIT pfd.

Go in head first, from 4-5 feet above the water. Unless you think your feet will still be sticking up, your head is 6 feet under. In fact, you will go that deep with a foam jacket. Try it.

I was doing so MOB related testing a few weeks ago. One of the errors I see all the time is people "carefully" jumping in. Nope, you were tripped, go head first.

I'll bet dinner this is the most common cause of cold water MOBs dying. The Mac guy, for example.

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1 hour ago, thinwater said:

Go in head first, from 4-5 feet above the water. Unless you think your feet will still be sticking up, your head is 6 feet under. In fact, you will go that deep with a foam jacket. Try it.

I was doing so MOB related testing a few weeks ago. One of the errors I see all the time is people "carefully" jumping in. Nope, you were tripped, go head first.

I'll bet dinner this is the most common cause of cold water MOBs dying. The Mac guy, for example.

 

1 hour ago, airborneshodan said:

I was thrown overboard off leward side and went at least 5 to six feet deep before inflatable mustang popped and then I came bobbing to surface like a rocket.  Thinking on the way down...I had a lot of time to think as time slows...that I should have practiced manual inflation in a pool.  I think the guy in the Mackinac race probably had the same thought.   I was not in full foulies..jjust salopettes.

I've done offshore survival, and we did inflation testing, etc. One of the things we were all very surprised was how buoyant we were with full foulies. There was a ton of air trapped inside our clothing that prevented us from sinking deep enough to trigger an activation. Probably not the same without foulies, but then if you're wearing shorts the water won't be that cold that will cause shock.

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