Jud - s/v Sputnik

Jeanne Socrates - nonstop solo RTW 2018

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0700 NZ (1100 Pacific time), she is 6.7 miles from "the rock" (Pohowaitai Island, furthest west of the Muttonbird Islands).
Sunrise/sunset times are now one hour different than found yesterday on Windy.com...?  Now says sunrise will be at 0818 NZ, one+ hour from now.

  • 22/05/2019 16:45:10
  • Address:    Southland, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -47.188900, 167.164000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    166°

svnereida_190522f.thumb.jpg.7a622639b51610e93371b4a4fd175352.jpg

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May be the winds are W - NW and she is gybing to avoid going DDW to make it easier to steer. Nevertheless IMHO that easterly route was a bit reckless. With a wounded boat, I would avoid a leeshore like the plague.

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Yeah, I'd like to hear the rationale that went into changing course to DDW for six hours, toward the lee shore, giving up the comfortable safety margin afforded by heading toward the mark?  Near as I can tell, that happened ~12 hours ago, around 8:00 pm NZ (2000 NZ).

The slow speeds reported on the tracker are puzzling too.  Was an easy broad reach before going DDW, requiring a beam reach to recover, in ~21 knots true wind gusting to ~30+ knots with beam seas 10' @ 8 secs.  Slowly, with no main.  Wind moderating slightly now and she is clearing the islands, though not by much!  Only ~4 nm. away as the sun is rising there.  Nearly back to original heading, before the DDW detour.

  • 22/05/2019 18:16:08
  • Address:    Southland, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -47.238300, 167.247000
  • Speed:    3.9 knots
  • Heading:    131°

svnereida_190522h.thumb.jpg.cc40616a97a57b4d38f95643ed831bb4.jpg

Three nautical miles away, 0844 NZ (1244 Pacific):

svnereida_190522i.thumb.jpg.03db8cf68d6a1abd16b3cb08f93d1768.jpg

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Possible that the wind speed and direction shown on your screen/weather program is different from what she’s actually experiencing?  That would maybe explain her course?

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2.3 nm. away!  Wind has moderated further to W ~16 knots gusting to 25 knots, Waves W 9 feet @ 8 secs.  (according to Windy.com ECMWF)

  • 22/05/2019 18:46:24
  • Address:    Southland, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -47.255400, 167.281000
  • Speed:    3.9 knots
  • Heading:    126°

svnereida_190522j.thumb.jpg.70e0e964f76eab2863ee015a95a41c21.jpg

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Yikes! I hope she is back on course after the bird watching.

81C8B722-8A2A-4319-8E0F-153C1EFDDABE.jpeg

4FE55B11-D2F0-4E7F-887D-172ACC9AAC51.jpeg

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Could be planning to stay tucked up in the lee of Stewart Is. There is plenty of room between the coast & the North Traps. Going around the South traps will expose her to the very strong NW winds forecast for Saturday.

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Possible that the wind speed and direction shown on your screen/weather program is different from what she’s actually experiencing?  That would maybe explain her course?

+1

From her angles, I think that the wind is already W-NW

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This blog entry explains the apparent (from here) DDW detour:

Day 231 Tues-Wed 21-22 May 2019 Very nearly there! Almost around the final Great Cape, on Stewart Island, New Zealand!

Quote

6:30pm Dark now and raining slightly. Gybed onto port tack. We were having trouble making our course in a WNW wind, and speed was too often around 4kt or more - meaning we'd arrive at Stewart Island in the dark - not in my plan! So I've furled in the genoa to a handkerchief size. Amazingly, we're still often touching 4kt - wind has been around 20-24kt all afternoon. Will gybe again around midnight and head out if still going too fast to make the Cape around dawn or later...

 

Had trouble holding course of ~135 (SE) on starboard (after ~16 hours on that course) so jibed to port tack, heading due east.  Slowly.  That was key.

svnereida_190522k.thumb.jpg.8b71ea042d6a4f8781d9fbff8e27999d.jpg

She is hugging the coastline (less than 3 nm. away) to avoid "The Traps", and enjoy the view in daylight, of course.  She has earned it!

svnereida_190522l.thumb.jpg.ba094491cdacb88a279632d09fbcbd4b.jpg

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And she is around the final cape, congrats Jeanne! And with her wind generator potentially repaired, in reasonable shape to make it home in a few more months.

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I'm impressed.

I don't know about the wind gen... not familiar with that model but with mine ( aerogen ) the fan has to come off the shaft to replace a blade. All blades must be laid out on base plate before face plate is put back on....

Even though, if you have a look at the boat photos on her site, she effectively has a ladder up the side of her stern arch it will still be quite a job. Akin to riding an express elevator if there is any sort of sea running.

 

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She seemed to be making good speed up the coast but when I looked at MTraffic an hour ago it had her heading SW and that seems to be a consistent trend....

A temporary thing or has the list of problems that she is heading into the Pacific with  just become too long?

The latest  being that she has run out of fresh water and is relying on her watermaker that in turn relies on her ability to make power from her sole remaing source... not sure if that is an independent gen set or simply the alternator on her engine...

We shall see what we shall see in the morning... sunrise is about 8 hours away... https://www.sunrise-and-sunset.com/en/sun/new-zealand/bluff

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She has been going backwards (SW) for ~3 hours, a distance of ~3.6 miles.  Since passing Pohowaitai Island Wednesday (~noon Pacific), she traveled ~130 nm. in ~1.5 days (87 nm./day = 3.6 knots) before turning around. 

  • 24/05/2019 10:51:46
  • Address:    Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -46.565000, 170.049000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    265°

https://www.windy.com/?-46.805,169.538,9,m:cmVakSv

Wind WNW 20 knots gusting to 27 knots, Waves W 10 feet @ 10 secs.

svnereida_190524a.jpg.fa147c4e04a29cf566d2f63c7b98898b.jpg

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svnereida_190524b.thumb.jpg.343e2a24ec4701245160e76b89a403f2.jpg

  • 24/05/2019 19:56:17
  • Address:    Toko Mouth, Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -46.466500, 170.181000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    52°

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She's probably feeling like a bit happier camper now that she's in the lee of some land.  Good opportunity to rest, rejuvenate and take stock.

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svnereida_190525a.thumb.jpg.b983be44619c76b58de301c3c446fe7e.jpg

Distance between P1 and P2 is 20.2 nm.  Elapsed time between those two points is 31 hours and ten minutes.
Average speed between P1 and P2 = 20.2 nm. / 31.17 hours = 0.65 knots.

P1:

  • 24/05/2019 07:49:55
  • Address:    Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -46.542400, 170.127000
  • Speed:    0.0 knots
  • Heading:    90°

P2:

  • 25/05/2019 14:59:49
  • Address:    Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -46.280600, 170.433000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    42°

 

By the way, the blog was updated yesterday but the title wasn't fully changed, causing some confusion...

https://svnereida.com/blog/5115-day-233-thurs-fri-23-24-may-2019-party-time-rounded-south-cape-on-stewart-island-new-zealand-fifth-great-cape-of-southern-ocean-heading-n-now

image5f8eb7c9ea9567d2f59ce23dd13f56e0.jpeg.b251b7513a883ae5c2a9bc64409fe218.jpeg

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Wind gen repair is far simpler than I thought....nothing like what is required on an Aerogen....

I hope, however, that she is aware of the fact that she must change all three.... maybe someone in contact with her can check on that...?

From the manual....

'Superwind rotor blades are manufactured as sets of three, balanced by weight and axial runout. These 3 blades can be fixed to the hub in any order. However, do not mix and match blades from different Superwind 350 blades sets as this could cause the rotor to become out of balance. This means that if a single Superwind 350 blade is damaged, the entire blade set needs to be replaced - not just one blade.'

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21 nm. ESE of Dunedin, NZ:

  • 26/05/2019 17:38:06
  • Address:    Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -45.945100, 171.006000
  • Speed:    0.0 knots
  • Heading:    59°

https://www.windy.com/?-46.026,170.656,8,m:cozakUd

Wind N 15 knots gusting to 19 knots.  Looking at the week ahead... she might be going nowhere until Thursday.

Wind gets light today, then strengthens to NE 16 knots at dawn NZ (noon Monday Pacific time), then N 18 knots that evening (Monday Pacific, Tuesday NZ).  Brief westerlies on Tuesday (Pacific, Wednesday NZ) but the wind doesn't really turn in her favor (SW) until Thursday (Pacific, Friday NZ), and then increases strength next Saturday (Pacific, Sunday NZ), briefly, fueled by a low passing north of her on Friday (Pacific, Saturday NZ), headed east from between the North and South Islands.

Noon Friday Pacific - Dawn Saturday, NZ:

svnereida_190526a.thumb.jpg.29a47d68b19b22c4cc8a26ff4289e5df.jpg

svnereida_190526b.thumb.jpg.4e7440694d71c20c5492dbdac7286738.jpg

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...if the breeze is N’ly then reach E. She needs to get moving, sheesh.

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Jeanne is in no hurry, and for good reason.

The longer it takes, the older she will be, so the more certain her record (oldest person to lap the planet nonstop) will last awhile.

She has a lot of deferred maintenance and repairs after being in the Southern Ocean for several months: sails, electrical, and I am sure many, many little things she has not mentioned.

Before sailing far to the East and then 7000 miles north, she probably wants her vessel in good condition.

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I think she has demonstrated a lot of wisdom in her patience over the last months.

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On 5/25/2019 at 6:45 PM, ProaSailor said:

svnereida_190525a.thumb.jpg.b983be44619c76b58de301c3c446fe7e.jpg

Distance between P1 and P2 is 20.2 nm.  Elapsed time between those two points is 31 hours and ten minutes.
Average speed between P1 and P2 = 20.2 nm. / 31.17 hours = 0.65 knots.

P1:

  • 24/05/2019 07:49:55
  • Address:    Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -46.542400, 170.127000
  • Speed:    0.0 knots
  • Heading:    90°

P2:

  • 25/05/2019 14:59:49
  • Address:    Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -46.280600, 170.433000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    42°

 

By the way, the blog was updated yesterday but the title wasn't fully changed, causing some confusion...

https://svnereida.com/blog/5115-day-233-thurs-fri-23-24-may-2019-party-time-rounded-south-cape-on-stewart-island-new-zealand-fifth-great-cape-of-southern-ocean-heading-n-now

image5f8eb7c9ea9567d2f59ce23dd13f56e0.jpeg.b251b7513a883ae5c2a9bc64409fe218.jpeg

Yes, not much progress but presumably she is recovering from the knock down and sorting out as much stuff as possible while she is in the lee of New Zealand.

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32 minutes ago, carcrash said:

Jeanne is in no hurry, and for good reason.

The longer it takes, the older she will be, so the more certain her record (oldest person to lap the planet nonstop) will last awhile.

She has a lot of deferred maintenance and repairs after being in the Southern Ocean for several months: sails, electrical, and I am sure many, many little things she has not mentioned.

Before sailing far to the East and then 7000 miles north, she probably wants her vessel in good condition.

She is still in the Southern Ocean... she didn't suddenly arrive in an area of smooth seas and balmy breezes when she cleared Stewart Island ...

https://www.metservice.com/maps-radar/maps/tasman-sea-nz

Chalmers Forecast

Northerly 15 knots, easing to variable 10 knots this afternoon.Sea slight.Southwest swell 2 metres offshore,easing.Northeast swell 1 metre developing. Fair visibility in rain this afternoon.

Three Day Outlook

Gradually rising Tuesday northerly 25 knots with rough sea, changing overnight Tuesday westerly 25 knots,becoming Wednesday morning northerly 15 knots,changing Thursday southerly 15 knots. Northeast swell becoming moderate offshore Tuesday.

 

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1 hour ago, carcrash said:

I think she has demonstrated a lot of wisdom in her patience over the last months.

Exactly - never forget her age.

I'm a lot younger than her and I'm starting to notice the stresses of just local cruising. What she is pulling off is truly remarkable - at any age but especially for someone her age.

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36 minutes ago, Cisco said:

She is still in the Southern Ocean... she didn't suddenly arrive in an area of smooth seas and balmy breezes when she cleared Stewart Island ...

https://www.metservice.com/maps-radar/maps/tasman-sea-nz

Chalmers Forecast

Northerly 15 knots, easing to variable 10 knots this afternoon.Sea slight.Southwest swell 2 metres offshore,easing.Northeast swell 1 metre developing. Fair visibility in rain this afternoon.

Three Day Outlook

Gradually rising Tuesday northerly 25 knots with rough sea, changing overnight Tuesday westerly 25 knots,becoming Wednesday morning northerly 15 knots,changing Thursday southerly 15 knots. Northeast swell becoming moderate offshore Tuesday.

 

2 metre swell is nothing compared to what she had in the proper southern ocean where the fetch is immense.

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According to today's post,  she has the wind generator working, main up at 3rd reef, but is worried she fried her electronics,  including her chart plotter.

 

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I am so impressed with what Jeanne is doing. As I get older — 62 in a few weeks — it is clear that age really makes a lot of life difficult. I hope to have a fraction of her fitness!

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3 hours ago, Panoramix said:

2 metre swell is nothing compared to what she had in the proper southern ocean where the fetch is immense infinite.

FIFY

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10 hours ago, Panoramix said:

2 metre swell is nothing compared to what she had in the proper southern ocean where the fetch is immense.

Really, I didn't know that.... :)

You would actually be quite surprised how quickly a southern ocean swell can go bugger orf....

The weather and sea state that you can experience east of New Zealand is not disimilar to that you can experience east of Argentinian Patagonia .... it can be seriously shit.... it can also be muy tranquilo  and see you 'glassed out' for days on end. I am happy that she has had settled conditions and been able to fix stuff but she is by no means out of the woods yet.

 

Meanwhile... the weather about 300 miles to her north...

Issued by MetService at: 4:42pm Monday 27 May 2019
Valid to: Midnight Tuesday 28 May 2019

Castlepoint Forecast

*** GALE WARNING IN FORCE ***
North of Cape Palliser: Northwest 20 knots,turning northeast 20 knots this afternoon, rising to northwest 35 knots early Tuesday evening.In the south: Northwest 35 knots, easing to 25 knots this evening,then rising to 35 knots again late Tuesday afternoon, and to 45 knots Tuesday evening. Sea becoming high in the south. Northeast swell 2 metres developing. Southwest swell 1 metre,dying out. Fair visibility in scattered rain Tuesday afternoon and evening.

Three Day Outlook

Becoming Wednesday morning northwest 25 knots but 35 knots in the south, then becoming Thursday northerly 35 knots but northwest 45 knots in the south. Easing early Friday northwest 25 knots but 35 knots in the south, changing late Friday southwest 15 knots everywhere. Sea high at times in the south. Moderate northerly swell, easing in the north Wednesday and elsewhere Friday.

Chatham Islands Forecast

*** GALE WARNING IN FORCE ***
Northerly 20 knots, rising to 35 knots Tuesday evening. Sea becoming very rough. Southwest swell 2 metre easing. Northerly swell 2 metres developing. Poor visibility in rain developing late Tuesday evening.

Three Day Outlook

Easing Wednesday morning northwest 20 knots, turning for a time later Wednesday southwest 15 knots. Rising early Friday northerly 35 knots, easing late Friday 20 knots. Sea very rough at times. Northerly swell becoming heavy Friday.

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Infinite fetch, no swell...... most southern tip of Isla Hornos.... the actual Cabo de Hornos.... a few miles SW of the lighthouse, the Capehorners memorial and the Alcamar station......

Two different days...

 

 

100_1315.jpg

P1000819.jpg

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Her domain name / web server (blog) is down this morning: https://svnereida.com/

She is ~39 nm. NE of Dunedin, NZ:

  • 27/05/2019 11:44:53
  • Address:    Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -45.494800, 171.297000
  • Speed:    0.0 knots
  • Heading:    22°

https://www.windy.com/?-45.781,170.233,8,m:cpkakUE

Wind NE 8 knots gusting to 11 knots, Waves E 3 feet @ 7 secs.

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From this morning's (NZ time) blog....

Spoke to NZ Customs about possibly anchoring or picking up a buoy while doing repairs - possibly expecting some very strong wind and seas in a few days' time and still have several urgent repairs to do..

After this next bit of N'ly weather has moved on it looks like a soldiers' breeze from the south for a while.. she would just need to follow it around the leading edge of the next high ......

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On 5/27/2019 at 12:35 AM, Cisco said:

Infinite fetch, no swell...... most southern tip of Isla Hornos.... the actual Cabo de Hornos.... a few miles SW of the lighthouse, the Capehorners memorial and the Alcamar station......

Two different days...

100_1315.jpg

P1000819.jpg

Reminds me - here’s the other Cape Horn         :-) (just the other day). Three hundred goddamn people lined up for the summit at 29,000’/8800m altitude.  (Pity they’re not skilled or brave enough to be on the ridge approaching one of the many other great Himalayan peaks instead of being with 300 other people!). Insane.  

As Webb Chiles wrote the other day (with this pic), “As far as I’m aware, there are no lines to sail alone around Cape Horn.” http://self-portraitinthepresentseajournal.blogspot.com/2019/05/evanston-appalled-and-two-quotes.html?m=1

CC98B852-7816-4E3C-B0BE-9EA72E78FE97.png

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45 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Three hundred goddamn people lined up for the summit at 29,000’/8800m altitude.

It's first world excess personified. With some exceptions of course, it's totally unprepared rich people paying upwards of 60k for a team of sherpas to do everything for them except put on foot in front of the other just so they can say that they "conquered" nature - the opposite of why most of us go sailing. 

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Reminds me of the old pics of the Chilkoot Pass during the Klondike gold rush.

image.png.19e3a50d40177a5648c322e2514785c1.png

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Reminds me of my first time approaching the Horn..... I thought that it had an infestation of Argentine fire ants..... area around the lighthouse was crawling  with little creatures queueing  up to buy trinkets from the alcamar and get their passports stamped.... the cruise liner Hanseatic had landed all her punters... maybe two or three hundred of them....

Had all been re-embarked by the time I landed my three.........

The world is fucked.... did you know there is a daily 787 service from Santiago to Rapa Nui?

Fucked I say.... totally.... my sister 'rounded the Horn' at age 75....

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Fucked, indeed.  This otherwise decent book is ruined by an over-ambitious title —no doubt, suggested by publisher eager to sell books.  (He does go past Cape Horn, but not in the commonly accepted parlance of “rounding”.  It’s an otherwise decent book with good references to other books about the indigenous Yaghan culture, colonial history, sailing in the region, etc.)  

2AB737F1-3853-4F8A-9840-D36B56BFEEF1.jpeg

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Today's update...

'2:25pm Just spoke to the Commodore, Kevin Murdoch, of the N.Otago Yacht and Powerboat Club in Oamaru Hbr about coming in and picking up a buoy (under sail) in the harbour sometime over the next day or so in order to get my repairs done. I've had to gain permission from both NZ Customs and Quarantine to do so. Has meant quite a lot of phoning around but finally has turned out OK - thanks to all concerned. I just have to get there first - presently almost no wind and difficult to keep a course.'

Not sure why she can't use her engine while picking up the buoy...

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So much for "non-stop" if she grabs a mooring.  Now ~19 nm. ENE of Oamaru, NZ:

  • 28/05/2019 19:29:58
  • Address:    Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -45.025600, 171.423000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    268°

https://www.windy.com/?-44.870,171.527,9,m:cqbakUR

Wind N 13 knots gusting to 18 knots, Waves E 5 feet @ 8 secs.

Passing low brings peak winds Friday afternoon Pacific, Saturday morning NZ: SW 28 knots gusting to 40 knots

Favorable direction if she can grab it.

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9 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

So much for "non-stop" if she grabs a mooring.  Now ~19 nm. ENE of Oamaru, NZ:

  • 28/05/2019 19:29:58
  • Address:    Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -45.025600, 171.423000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    268°

https://www.windy.com/?-44.870,171.527,9,m:cqbakUR

Wind N 13 knots gusting to 18 knots, Waves E 5 feet @ 8 secs.

Passing low brings peak winds Friday afternoon Pacific, Saturday morning NZ: SW 28 knots gusting to 40 knots

Favorable direction if she can grab it.

Surely the same rules apply when racing as cruising - no outside assistance, no engine. Why should a buoy be worse than anchor? She’s spent enough time going backwards that stopping for a bit is fine.  

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'  'Record' is a very stupid word at sea.' as someone said....

 

R K-J dropped mail off with the pilot boat outside PPH and then I think 'stopped' again in NZ down near Bluff,  so my memory says...

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IMO if you don't tie up and go ashore you haven't "stopped".

As Ed said, a buoy is no different than an anchor.

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3 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

IMO if you don't tie up and go ashore you haven't "stopped".

As Ed said, a buoy is no different than an anchor.

My boat is on a mooring: it is constantly moving. (Unless I’m mistaken, it’s chomping at the bit to leave, like a horse penned up in a stable.)

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

IMO if you don't tie up and go ashore you haven't "stopped".

As Ed said, a buoy is no different than an anchor.

Tell that to US Immigration. Anchored is entered.

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Regardless of the definitions,  I’m glad to see that she’s still making prudent decisions, like trying to ensure that her vessel is seaworthy enough to continue.  ‘Summit fever’ does not seem to have kicked in.

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Sure has on Everest. Darwin is having a field day there.

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As I tell my crew, sometimes an anchor is the tactical best choice.

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She is about 5 miles off the port and the sun set 40 minutes ago.... presume she is 'standing off and on' until daylight

 

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8 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Tell that to US Immigration. Anchored is entered.

On one of her previous nonstops, she anchored in SF Bay for repairs without actually checking in with permission from the US and the record folks.

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She was heading west for Oamaru, 12.5 nm. away, but just recently turned around to head NE:

  • 29/05/2019 18:40:03
  • Address:    Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -45.061800, 171.290000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    30°

svnereida_190529a.thumb.jpg.150189ec49eabe6d0c4c0d007319382f.jpg

She was within 1.5 nm. of the harbor before turning east overnight.

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Off topic (it’s about the nonstop “figure 8 round the Horn then through the NWP voyage of Randall Reeves [sp?] from San Francisco) - but on topic in terms of drogues and self-steering, a topic of frequent discussion here.

Major damage to his Monitor vane (ripped off rudder [folded up/lashed down/out of the way, and not in use], stripped gears, bent frame) from drogue in really big seas...hell of a write up!!  And hell of a pic!  Drogues: use with caution, is my takeaway.

http://figure8voyage.com/pay-the-piper-monte/?fbclid=IwAR31sImkkcAzLpBA6xf679udjm3db2wykkdbw6-alM88-WH-s6z4LoXbOsM

The wave has broken fully over the boat, lifted the drogue bridle up and over the secured water paddle, and ripped it down as the line came under load again.

“The pinion gears have also been stripped out of alignment, and most amazingly, the frame is bent upwards by at least two inches on the starboard side. Though it freed by the time I got to it, the grinding I heard must have been the bridle continuing to pull at the Monitor assembly. This last revelation takes some time to see and is a shock. A damaged water paddle is like a parted shoe lace; a bent frame is a wreck of a different order.”

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On 5/28/2019 at 8:47 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Reminds me - here’s the other Cape Horn         :-) (just the other day). Three hundred goddamn people lined up for the summit at 29,000’/8800m altitude.  (Pity they’re not skilled or brave enough to be on the ridge approaching one of the many other great Himalayan peaks instead of being with 300 other people!). Insane.  

As Webb Chiles wrote the other day (with this pic), “As far as I’m aware, there are no lines to sail alone around Cape Horn.” http://self-portraitinthepresentseajournal.blogspot.com/2019/05/evanston-appalled-and-two-quotes.html?m=1

CC98B852-7816-4E3C-B0BE-9EA72E78FE97.png

That “Elbows and Assholes” approach was usually reserved for the Georgia prison chain gangs along I -95 in America.

 No freedom and no reward

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On 5/28/2019 at 6:43 PM, ProaSailor said:

So much for "non-stop" if she grabs a mooring.  Now ~19 nm. ENE of Oamaru, NZ:

  • 28/05/2019 19:29:58
  • Address:    Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -45.025600, 171.423000
  • Speed:    1.9 knots
  • Heading:    268°

https://www.windy.com/?-44.870,171.527,9,m:cqbakUR

Wind N 13 knots gusting to 18 knots, Waves E 5 feet @ 8 secs.

Passing low brings peak winds Friday afternoon Pacific, Saturday morning NZ: SW 28 knots gusting to 40 knots

Favorable direction if she can grab it.

Let’s hope “Non stop” means not making a stop ashore and she makes the journey intact:)

Jeanne has captivated the audience and has nothing to really prove after all she has been through so far!

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2 hours ago, Cisco said:

nothing to prove to the peanut gallery.

Unfortunately, she is giving up on her goal of "nonstop and unassisted", and that must be devastating.  The light air that has frustrated her approach to Oamaru was predicted.  Timaru is approximately 268 nm. from Pohowaitai Island, which she passed eight days ago on May 22.   That's ~33 nm,/day since then, or an average of 1.4 knots for eight days!  The knock down was a severe blow.

She is 8 nm. from Timaru:

  • 30/05/2019 10:46:05
  • Address:    Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -44.490600, 171.387000
  • Speed:    3.9 knots
  • Heading:    348°

svnereida_190530a.thumb.png.76ad39dd564744fc84a5cd9f2822a9c9.png

https://www.windy.com/?-44.360,171.903,9,m:cqXakUM

Wind SW 8 knots gusting to 14 knots, Waves 2 feet @ 6 secs.

svnereida_190530a.thumb.jpg.77bf29810290fff0ff599ef90b91ffd2.jpg

It's going to get sporty there tomorrow and the next day.  Wind SW 28 knots gusting to 40 knots.

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I give her a ton of credit for her effort. 

I just wish that she had sailed with a new set of sails. She would have been nowhere near her knockdown location and probably past Tonga by now.

She still holds the record for the oldest female solo!

 

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What assistance is she getting that disqualifies her from that part? I'm confused, I thought anchoring or mooring still counted as "nonstop?"

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She is intending to stop for awhile and apparently needs assistance to do so.  Just the facts, Jack.  From her blog: 

https://svnereida.com/blog/5120-day-238-tues-wed-28-29-may-2019-oamaru-entrance-made-impossible-in-w-wind-after-light-wind-with-30kt-gusts-overnight

Quote

They are planning to come out in a boat to show me the safe entry into the small harbour and to point out the buoy not far from the entrance that I will need to pick up. 5pm A second 'blow' around sunset which followed not so long after another even stronger one just as I was preparing to enter the harbour at Oamaru. Both blew up quite suddenly to 30-40kt - had to reef right down and in the first one I heaved to but the second one died down after a shorter time. Unfortunately, by the time the first had died down, and I'd been blown a good distance away from the harbour, the word was that there would not be enough water to enter - Low Water was imminent - pity! After some discussion on the options, with Kevin on board a small fishing boat that had come out to guide me in through the tricky entrance shallows, it was agreed that at 10:30pm I'd phone him to check if the wind was suitable to enter the harbour - not too strong but also not too light since I need to be able to steer the boat, of course. Later: The plan to enter at night was ditched as being too risky - I'm not familiar with the layout, although I do have a photo of it, and it would be difficult to pick up the buoy in the dark.

 

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I'm not sure I'd call following someone "assistance", especially because, in this case, it's a detour rather than forward progress. I'd lump it in the same category as all of the advice / help she's been getting on weather, her electronics, etc.  Regarding grabbing a mooring, no different than heaving to, something Jeanne has done a lot of. 

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IMO if she doesn't go ashore it's non-stop.

Racers aren't disqualified if they anchor due to foul currents - just for example.

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Just now, SloopJonB said:

IMO if she doesn't go ashore it's non-stop.

What qualifies as "assistance?"

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Taking a line from her.

Bringing her supplies.

Etc.

Some sort of physical assistance or contact.

Guiding her in is no different than providing her weather info to my mind.

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Unassisted sailing definition and rules are widely recognised as those set by the World Sailing Speed Record Council rule 21e.[1] Essentially this and the related 21h and 21i rules require that during the voyage:

  • No assistance of any kind be given except as allowed by 21h and 21i.
  • No supplies be taken on board (other than the "harvest of the sea").
  • A boat may be anchored or beached for repairs, but such repairs must be done entirely by the boat's crew with the tools and materials already on board.
  • The boat may not enter port.

The exceptions allowed by 21h and 21i are:

  • All forms of navigation equipment and communication are permitted. The sailor may receive advice, but must operate all equipment themselves. There must be no physical remote control
  • If the boat runs afoul of another vessel or structure, it is permitted for that vessel's or structure's crew to lend assistance in getting clear.
  • Engines may not be used, except for emergencies such as a man overboard, or giving emergency assistance.
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17 minutes ago, chester said:

 

Unassisted sailing definition and rules are widely recognised as those set by the World Sailing Speed Record Council rule 21e.[1] Essentially this and the related 21h and 21i rules require that during the voyage:

  • No assistance of any kind be given except as allowed by 21h and 21i.
  • No supplies be taken on board (other than the "harvest of the sea").
  • A boat may be anchored or beached for repairs, but such repairs must be done entirely by the boat's crew with the tools and materials already on board.
  • The boat may not enter port.

The exceptions allowed by 21h and 21i are:

  • All forms of navigation equipment and communication are permitted. The sailor may receive advice, but must operate all equipment themselves. There must be no physical remote control
  • If the boat runs afoul of another vessel or structure, it is permitted for that vessel's or structure's crew to lend assistance in getting clear.
  • Engines may not be used, except for emergencies such as a man overboard, or giving emergency assistance.

Great, very clear. Thanks.

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the only uncertainty for me in the current situation is whether picking up  a mooring equates to anchoring.

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Superb moments in the history of stopping to fix boats, unassisted, on nonstop RTW voyages.  One of my favourite jury-rig stories *ever* - Yves Parlier’s elaborate and ingenious repair of his shattered carbon mast - have told my teenage sailor daughter this one. Maybe I can turn it into an enthralling bedtime story for future grandkids :-).  It’s pretty enthralling of a story - hard to top this!

https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2015/12/15/47722/

 

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49 minutes ago, chester said:

the only uncertainty for me in the current situation is whether picking up  a mooring equates to anchoring.

They certainly aren't the same thing, are they.  And neither of them is the same as hove-to at sea, as suggested above.  She has invested days of effort to get into a harbor for a mooring, where she will certainly rest more easily while drying out and fixing things.  Any guess as to how long her stay will be? 

I couldn't find the prohibition against entering port in the actual WSSRC rules:
https://www.sailspeedrecords.com/the-courses-offshore

Though it is mentioned here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unassisted_sailing

WSSRC doesn't certify "oldest/youngest" records anyway.

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Lee shore of Canterbury bight should be given a wide berth and not be flirted with given forecast of increasing southerlies.  Akaroa Harbor, next inlet to the north, is open to the S and SE.. http://fishing-app.gpsnauticalcharts.com/i-boating-fishing-web-app/fishing-marine-charts-navigation.html?title=Akaroa+Harbour%2CNU+boating+app#11/-43.8350/172.9450

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As I write this she is about 4 miles NE of the entrance to Timaru and its almost sun-up.

Light winds out of the east-ish ( at the airport?) https://www.weather-forecast.com/locations/Timaru/forecasts/latest

I think she has more important things on her mind just now than the interpretation of the finer points of 'the rools'....

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  • 30/05/2019 19:21:33
  • Address:    Timaru, Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Lat/Lng:    -44.349500, 171.351000
  • Speed:    3.9 knots
  • Heading:    239°

svnereida_190530b.thumb.jpg.8c6a058a1d30c92e94856169d290ccaf.jpg

P.S.  Limited "moorings" in that industrial harbor, near two seawalls, Med tied.

svnereida_190530c.thumb.jpg.f61a553726cd6afad1d8eb39e20ac219.jpg

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There is a fishing boat harbour on the other side of that wall.... so she has a number of options.

Reminds me of Vito's arrival non stop from Capetown in 42(?).... no engine... sails in  and ties up.... a pompous arse in naval uniform promptly fronts up...'Oi... you can't tie up there!'

 

Dumas, for you youngsters out there , was the first true solo circumnavigator south of the capes....

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Less than a mile to go....

meanwhile a photo of Vito's boat in the Tigre Maritime Museum...

IMG_0248.JPG (2).jpg

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8 hours ago, Ajax said:

What qualifies as "assistance?"

From the World Sailing Speed Record Racing Rules:

Quote

21-e: With or without assistance
i: 'Without assistance' means that a vessel may not receive any kind of outside assistance whatever except for 21.h. and 21. i. nor take on board any supplies (beyond the harvest of the sea), materials or equipment during an attempt. A vessel may be anchored or beached during the attempt, but any repairs must be made entirely by the crew without outside resources or materials. It is never permitted to take on board stores or equipment or get any other kind of help from another vessel whilst under way (except as 'i' Emergencies below).

https://www.sailspeedrecords.com/index.php/the-courses-offshore )

21.h is about emergencies.  21.i is about rounding the marks and the "string" rule, so I don't understand why they mention that one.

I can find no definition of "nonstop", and I don't know it Guinness uses the above rules.  Anyway, nothing Jeanne has done (AFAIK) jeopardizes her "unassisted" status.

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3 minutes ago, valis said:

nothing Jeanne has done (AFAIK) jeopardizes her "unassisted" status.

in her prior voyage, she got a replacement life raft brought to the boat, which would normally be 'assistance' but she got an 'exception to the rule' from Guinness.

In Timaru, the situation looks tricky for her solo maneuvering under sail - the moorings are fore and aft ties, pretty close to the wall.  Not impossible by any means but tricky.  I believe the aft ties are to the wall, which as I understand it would violate 'the rules' - eg would be considered docking.  There is a fisherman's wharf which would be easier to come alongside under sail - but would certainly be docking.

 

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According to the chart, she's about 100ft from the mole.  Could she be anchored inside the harbor?

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2 hours ago, Rangi said:

The video is cool.

svnereida_190531a.thumb.jpg.ee58711e3820113c22d6aa83b92cef2f.jpg

svnereida_190531b.thumb.jpg.5ead6be6a63b92a2d3717d2fd1eb1e02.jpg

Still photo from article (by JOHN BISSET/STUFF):

1559280597827.thumb.jpg.b9ac82f75f93c96e6e722e659b4bc932.jpg

Only three weeks now until the solstice, the shortest day of the year there.  She is ~3,000 nm. from the equator.

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5 hours ago, valis said:

According to the chart, she's about 100ft from the mole.  Could she be anchored inside the harbor?

She definitely picked up a mooring (based on the video, and pilot boat comments).

The pilot boat may well have placed a temporary mooring just for her. The permanent yacht ones did not suit her needs at all.  This one is bow only and in a more open area (not great spot for N to E winds but great otherwise).  There is no mooring normally shown here (on chart nor on pictures), but it is possible they have a semi-concealed one here for special uses.

Great kindness and hospitality from the kiwi's.  That's how civilized people treat guests.

I'm sure she is so so happy to have a moment of quiet.  I remember the peace of a first quiet night after a long difficult passage - close to bliss. Now she just needs to figure out how to get a long hot shower and all will be well.

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Glad she has some time to rest and won’t be disqualified

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So what was this all about?

Occured where there is the bit of 'interesting stuff' happening in her track on the right hand side...

4am Got worried about position and wind needed to get in to harbour in the morning so started heading gently in the lessening breeze towards the green light I thought was one of the entrance lights. Wind was dying right down so difficult to keep a good course but was doing fine. Smelled a seaweed smell which surprised me, being a good distance off the shore... But a short time later, to my horror, I realised that we were dangerously close to a large, long, rocky, unlit breakwater. I jumped to the wheel and had to hold it full lock to get us away in very little breeze..

Entrance lights were on her port quarter by then....

Lack of sleep and hallucinating? Hard alongside an anchored ship? Combination of both?

 

timaru.jpg

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1 hour ago, Cisco said:

Lack of sleep and hallucinating?

 

 

My guess - probably that. She said she was totally fried.

You know well how things can go weird at night when you are tired, and in particular, lights look rather closer than they are.

No anchored ship shown on AIS, and the anchorage is typically a bit further in.

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