SailorMatt

Restoring a boat to racing condition...

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

At my club we have two J22's hull numbers 361 and 266 and to say the least they are requiring some attention in order to return them to their previous state and hopefully better. What would be involved in going from photo 1 to the end result in 2 and 3? They currently have old bottom paint and barrier coat that is at the end of it's life span... Both boats are stored in the water so I am assuming we would need to add some sort of bottom paint unlike 2 and 3?

Cheers,

Matt

J22 restoration 1.jpg

J22 Restoration 3.jpg

J22 Restoration 4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tons of hard work requiring expertise in this type of work and lots of money.  You will also need a place to keep the boats out of the water for a long time while they are worked on.  Next question?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, SailorMatt said:

@dash34 Is it time better spent just doing a new bottom paint coat and instead of a full refit spending that money on sails?

Yes.  Making the boat look pretty makes sense if you live on it and have to look at it every day.  If you are just racing it, all you really care about is how fast it goes.  They don't give prizes for best looking boat at regattas. Plus you can afford to buy your crew some beer after the race.  If you have old epoxy on the bottom, make sure you strip the bottom paint and, assuming you find no blisters, apply new epoxy before the bottom paint.  Interprotect comes well recommended.  Blisters are no fun at all, prevention is way better than the cure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, SailorMatt said:

Hi all,

At my club we have two J22's hull numbers 361 and 266 and to say the least they are requiring some attention in order to return them to their previous state and hopefully better. What would be involved in going from photo 1 to the end result in 2 and 3? They currently have old bottom paint and barrier coat that is at the end of it's life span... Both boats are stored in the water so I am assuming we would need to add some sort of bottom paint unlike 2 and 3?

Cheers,

Matt

J22 restoration 1.jpg

J22 Restoration 3.jpg

J22 Restoration 4.jpg

That looks like a weekend work in a yard.  Plus 4 Saturday afternoons on the trailer. It isn't rocket science - it is just labor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Black Jack said:

That looks like a weekend work in a yard.  Plus 4 Saturday afternoons on the trailer. It isn't rocket science - it is just labor.

That's good news! Do you know what type of paint we would need to use once we have the boat stripped?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are the boats dry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rebuilt a J27 about 6 years ago that was in far worse shape than your boats. I did pour tons of money in the project but did all the labor myself. That is the only thing that kept costs somewhat under control. I sold the boat for what I had invested. Luckily, I paid almost nothing for the boat originally. There is nothing difficult about working on these vintage J boats. If your deck gear, winches, sails, standing rigging and mast are OK, then everything else is just lots of labor and a few boat bucks. The other boats in your photos appear to have awlgrip or similar finish. If you want that done professionally bring lots of money. It can be done by skilled amateurs. But one of two things will happen. You will accept some minor runs / sagging of the finish or you will redo it many times until you get the hang of it. If it is purely a club race boat, make it fast and forget the mirror finish of awlgrip. That is just my opinion. 

IMG_3099.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Black Jack said:

That looks like a weekend work in a yard.  Plus 4 Saturday afternoons on the trailer. It isn't rocket science - it is just labor.

They want to paint it and make it shiny and new-looking like the one in the pictures.  Just getting it cleaned, waxed, stripped of bottom paint, re-epoxied and bottom-painted is more than a weekend of work unless you have 5-6 people working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making the boat look pretty is one thing, making the boat fast is another. I restored a J/22 in the past and here is what I found...

Structural

  1. If the boat is going to be lifted with a hoist. You are definatly going to want to make sure to address the keelbolts. I can't find a link for it, but there was an adapter kit out there for a while to change the lift ring to lift from 1 bolt and spread the load out over 2.
  2. Some of the older boats masts have a different mast step. The newer mast/mast step has a better angle for rake. You will definately want to upgrade this. We got lucky and took our mast out in a collision with a power line. Pretty sure we ordered our new mast from Sparcraft.
  3. Check the chainplates and bulkheads! If it's an older boat, there is a 99.9% chance they need some attention.
  4. FAIR YOUR FOILS! It's a big task for the DIY crews, but it can be done and the templates are certainly available. Otherwise, I seem to remember that just about everyone in the class sent their boats to Waterline.
  5. The newer boats replaced the teak toe rails and handles with a PVC toe rail and stainless handrail. I am pretty sure class legal versions of these are available, but you can also fabricate them.

The bottom

  1. We stripped the old VC-17 off and then applied a thin coat of West with the addative from a can of VC17 mixed in for color. This allowed us to see the highs and lows for fairing much better. Yea it was ugly, but if you are keeping it in the water you are going to put VC17 back on again anyways.
  2. Burnish the hell out of it.
  3. Come to think of it, we are changing out our bottom next year to Pettit Black Widow which I think burnishes better.

The hullsides

  1. We repainted ours with 1part poly rolled and tipped. Unless you are really good at rolling and tipping, I don't recommend this. Have a profession shop respray it.

The topsides

  1. Do this the right way!
  2. The older boats have lots of dings, nicks, and spider cracks (especially around the chain plates). Dremmel these out, fill them and fair them.
  3. Take a moisture meter to the deck. 100% chance you have soft spots on an older hull number. Find the soft spots and recore them from the underside
  4. As far as repainting the deck is concerned, it's important to remember that the deck paint needs to be pretty durable. We sprayed 3 coats of 2-part poly, as it's a bit harder than 1-part. 

If all of this seems to be too much, just remember that a well sailed, ugly and fast boat is always faster then a poorly sailed, pretty and slow boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Jubblies Thanks so much for all that info. Our plan is to get them up into some tents over the winter and just go at it over the course of the winter. I will definitely look into the mast step and our main concern right now is re doing the bottom as it is really rough. The hull above the waterline looks much better after we took some polish and hull cleaner to it last night.

IMG_1868.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Easy peasy 

Search here for “Flirt of Paget”. Detailed instructions. Figure 2 weekends, Max.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2018 at 11:52 AM, Jubblies said:
  1. We got lucky and took our mast out in a collision with a power line. Pretty sure we ordered our new mast from Sparcraft.

 

wtf...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The time to do the work is a strong function of the knowledge, tools and physical endurance brought to the task. 

Professionals have all of those, most amateurs few to none. 

Don't be afraid to buy "GOOD" tools if you are going to be resurfacing large areas.

Fiberglass dust is an irritant, some paints are toxic. 

Technique is a big opportunity for "learning", another way to say you pay tuition to get better. Be that in hiring a pro to teach, or wasting materials, supplies and time. 

Standing up/bending over/crouching under a boat and using power and hand tools for hours a day is hard work. Most people would not go to a gym and take a 5lb weight to wave around for hours at a time, yet expect that they can use a DA sander or buffer with 1/2 hp and control it well. See the "GOOD" tools comment, and buy lightweight, professional grade not the home depot stuff. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J22s are sweet sailing boats. Nice to see this happening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now