Jackdaw

Fenders out as to not scratch the lighthouse

Recommended Posts

Last weekend on Lake Superior.  I've been around the tip of the Keeweenaw many times, and this boggles the mind.

 

 

 

bricks.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh. There's no tides on the lake. How'd he get so high and dry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Huh. There's no tides on the lake. How'd he get so high and dry?

Practice? Perseverance?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how he got there as the dinghy is still on the painter, but you can see the skipper standing on the shore admiring his handiwork. The rocks that make up the Keeweenaw are nasty; jagged and sharp. Probably the last place in the world I'd want to go aground in a glass boat.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Waves may have been bigger last night.  10' is easy if there's enough fetch.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Jackdaw said:

Not sure how he got there as the dinghy is still on the painter, but you can see the skipper standing on the shore admiring his handiwork. The rocks that make up the Keeweenaw are nasty; jagged and sharp. Probably the last place in the world I'd want to go aground in a glass boat.

 

I'll never criticize the Great Lakes as being "puddles" or "just lakes."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How will he get off?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Bull City said:

How will he get off?

Sikorsky?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Bull City said:

How will he get off?

By demanding that newbies post tit pics, of course.

FB- Doug

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, valis said:

Sikorsky?

I was thinking the same thing - if he wants to save the boat.  I can't see it surviving being drug back off the rocks.  Anyway some kind of sacrifical float could be placed underneath it, lifting if high enough long enough to drag it back across the ledge?  Just thinking out loud, I don't know much about these kinds of things. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

By demanding that newbies post tit pics, of course.

FB- Doug

That's how we get off.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, SloopJonB said:
43 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

By demanding that newbies post tit pics, of course.

FB- Doug

That's how we get off.

Speak for yourself. I'm still a newlywed.

And one of my ambitions as a sailor is to never have a rock named after me. One way to achieve this is to move to aplace like eastern NC, where it's all sand & mud ;)

FB- Doug

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Speak for yourself. I'm still a newlywed.

And one of my ambitions as a sailor is to never have a rock named after me. One way to achieve this is to move to a place like eastern NC, where it's all sand & mud ;)

FB- Doug

You could have a shoal named for yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

maybe the dude can come on SA and post that pick in the "show your boat not sailing" thread.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Bull City said:
43 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

...   ...    ...

And one of my ambitions as a sailor is to never have a rock named after me. One way to achieve this is to move to a place like eastern NC, where it's all sand & mud ;)

You could have a shoal named for yourself.

 

Hmm.... well to be honest, there are a few shoals around here that have/had my footprints on them, but I dn't think any of them are named after me, now

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bull City said:

How will he get off?

That's when the spinnaker halyard comes very handy...

The boat seems to be floating high, may be he got lucky and landed in between rocks on pebbles. He needs to find 2 shallow draft boats PDQ though (one to tow and one to list the boat with a halyard). Or may be a few heavy anchors with a lot of line and strong arms...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ajax said:

Huh. There's no tides on the lake. How'd he get so high and dry?

I grew up in MI and I heard when I was younger that there is a small tide on Lake Superior. But I could be wrong. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chester said:

maybe the dude can come on SA and post that pick in the "show your boat not sailing" thread.

Ouch.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, woahboy said:

I grew up in MI and I heard when I was younger that there is a small tide on Lake Superior. But I could be wrong. 

Not in the traditional sense. While there is some depth change at max spring tide (1-2 inch), the whole system is considered non-tidal. Sometimes weather can cause one side or the lake to rise or fall by several feet, but that's different and locally called a seiche.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The coasties helivaced the single 70 year old off the boat and brought him to a hospital 70 miles away. Boat was left to fend for its self. Not sure what is next. That island is as about as remote as you can get in the lower 48.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

A Coast Guard helicopter from Air Station Traverse City rescued a 73 year old man from a sail boat that ran aground on Manitou Island near the Keweenaw Peninsula, this morning.

At 5:30 a.m. EST, Coast Guard Sector Sault Sainte Marie Command Center receieved an uncorrelated “mayday” distress radio call from a sailing vessel stating that it was hard aground on rocks. The command center immediately launched a MH-60 helicopter from Air Station Traverse City. The helicopter established communications with the mariner at 8:35 a.m. and employed direction finding radio equipment to locate the aground sailboat. The helicopter deployed a rescue swimmer who assisted the distressed mariner and hoisted him to safety. The man was then transported to emergency services.

Mariners are reminded to have operable electronic position indicating beacons, life jackets, distress flares, and VHF radios, and to inform friends or family of your float plan prior to departing on a voyage. A float plan includes where you are going, how long you will be gone, what you are doing, and when you expect to be back. This information is invaluable for search efforts in the case that you need assistance.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, IStream said:

Ouch.

yea, i guess that was pretty callous.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a friend who is our "Rock star"   

I am quite grateful to him as there are quite a few places where the under water topology is very much clearer to me, after he went storming in, withh the greatest of confidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, chester said:

yea, i guess that was pretty callous.  

I'm normally an "if you don't have anything nice to say, come sit by me" kinda guy but I'd maybe wait until the guy's out of the hospital.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bull City said:

You could have a shoal named for yourself.

Or a sunken piling. I was looking at charts of Pamlico & Albemarle  & there are all these deadheads,  pilings, cribs, & other detritus of 250 years of intensive usage.  Plus occasional live fire ranges!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

 

Hmm.... well to be honest, there are a few shoals around here that have/had my footprints on them, but I dn't think any of them are named after me, now

FB- Doug

"Steamer Shoal" - sounds good. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Jackdaw said:

Last weekend on Lake Superior.  I've been around the tip of the Keeweenaw many times, and this boggles the mind.

 

 

 

bricks.jpeg

Not everyone can lawn dart it properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Panoramix said:

That's when the spinnaker halyard comes very handy...

The boat seems to be floating high, may be he got lucky and landed in between rocks on pebbles. He needs to find 2 shallow draft boats PDQ though (one to tow and one to list the boat with a halyard). Or may be a few heavy anchors with a lot of line and strong arms...

Boat is not floating high - it is standing out of the water on its keel and leaning against a rock. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, PaulK said:

Boat is not floating high - it is standing out of the water on its keel and leaning against a rock. 

That's when you need to be friend with a chinook pilot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Or a sunken piling. I was looking at charts of Pamlico & Albemarle  & there are all these deadheads,  pilings, cribs, & other detritus of 250 years of intensive usage.  Plus occasional live fire ranges!

The muddy Chesapeake is pretty benign and sometimes it's easy to forget that the bay has a 250 year long history of sunken islands, ports, long abandoned villages, docks and piers.

I was sailing home in bouncy weather one September, getting near home and getting antsy so I cut across a shallow area. On the chart was a note about submerged pilings. I thought to myself "these are probably from over 50 years ago. What are the odds that hazard remains?"

There was a short, ugly chop running and as I sailed, I passed near to one of those pilings. I saw the tip as the wave troughs passed by. If I'd sailed over it, the waves would have picked my boat up and dropped the hull right onto it, impaling the boat. I immediately tacked and GTFO.  I've avoided that area ever since and I take the chart notes as gospel, no matter how old the chart is.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:
12 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Or a sunken piling. I was looking at charts of Pamlico & Albemarle  & there are all these deadheads,  pilings, cribs, & other detritus of 250 years of intensive usage.  Plus occasional live fire ranges!

The muddy Chesapeake is pretty benign and sometimes it's easy to forget that the bay has a 250 year long history of sunken islands, ports, long abandoned villages, docks and piers.

I was sailing home in bouncy weather one September, getting near home and getting antsy so I cut across a shallow area. On the chart was a note about submerged pilings. I thought to myself "these are probably from over 50 years ago. What are the odds that hazard remains?"

There was a short, ugly chop running and as I sailed, I passed near to one of those pilings. I saw the tip as the wave troughs passed by. If I'd sailed over it, the waves would have picked my boat up and dropped the hull right onto it, impaling the boat. I immediately tacked and GTFO.  I've avoided that area ever since and I take the chart notes as gospel, no matter how old the chart is.

There's a couple of target practice areas on the Chesapeake, also.

And you'd be amazed how many people either don't know, and charge forward boldly, or shrug and say "THey won't hit me." I've seen pictures of fishermen tied off to one of the warning signs when it was flashing. I would say Darwin in action but families tend to sue

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2018 at 11:58 AM, Jackdaw said:

Last weekend on Lake Superior.  I've been around the tip of the Keeweenaw many times, and this boggles the mind.

 

 

 

bricks.jpeg

Photo taken immediately before, tragically, the plane crashed into the lighthouse because the pilot was distracted by a boat on a rock.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

There's a couple of target practice areas on the Chesapeake, also.

And you'd be amazed how many people either don't know, and charge forward boldly, or shrug and say "THey won't hit me." I've seen pictures of fishermen tied off to one of the warning signs when it was flashing. I would say Darwin in action but families tend to sue

FB- Doug

*Cough*  Um, while sailing to Smith Island a couple of years ago, I cut through the "verboten" circle on the chart for the target ship Global Mariner, again, because I thought "I'll bet the Navy doesn't use this thing anymore."

Imagine my surprise while we were at Smith Island and I heard loud, distant booms from out in the bay. We were chatting with one of the locals when he said "Yep, they bombing that old ship again."  My eyes got wide and I asked "They still use that damned thing?" and he responded with an "Oh yes, all the time!"

Don't get me wrong, I didn't sail right up to the target ship or anchor or tie off to anything, we just kind of cut through the perimeter and I did have my radio on but still...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Ajax said:

*Cough*  Um, while sailing to Smith Island a couple of years ago, I cut through the "verboten" circle on the chart for the target ship Global Mariner, again, because I thought "I'll bet the Navy doesn't use this thing anymore."

Imagine my surprise while we were at Smith Island and I heard loud, distant booms from out in the bay. We were chatting with one of the locals when he said "Yep, they bombing that old ship again."  My eyes got wide and I asked "They still use that damned thing?" and he responded with an "Oh yes, all the time!"

Don't get me wrong, I didn't sail right up to the target ship or anchor or tie off to anything, we just kind of cut through the perimeter and I did have my radio on but still...

Would that be American Mariner?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, KC375 said:

Would that be American Mariner?

 

Oops, correct. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a Defence Dept. small arms range next to our marina on Lake Ontario. A legacy from when it was just a rural area. The high back stop berm is at the lake shore and is signed and is flagged on shore when in use. Yellow marker buoys run out 1 mile from shore, 1/2 mile across. Boaters of all types with no chart, or no knowledge of the notes on the charts transit the area  daily. Firing normally stops when that happens. Rounds don't top the berm very often, but we have heard them zipping/snapping down range on occasion. Have not heard of any casualties in the last 10 years we have been there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This pic taken by the left-seater of the Jayhawk seem to show the boat standing on its keel. Not a good sign for the boat; as if anything mattered at this point.

 

 

42823479_2210260479242441_4709604907634655232_n.jpg.44cd5f7111e30b332d90231d8b08afd1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ajax said:

The muddy Chesapeake is pretty benign and sometimes it's easy to forget that the bay has a 250 year long history of sunken islands, ports, long abandoned villages, docks and piers.

I was sailing home in bouncy weather one September, getting near home and getting antsy so I cut across a shallow area. On the chart was a note about submerged pilings. I thought to myself "these are probably from over 50 years ago. What are the odds that hazard remains?"

There was a short, ugly chop running and as I sailed, I passed near to one of those pilings. I saw the tip as the wave troughs passed by. If I'd sailed over it, the waves would have picked my boat up and dropped the hull right onto it, impaling the boat. I immediately tacked and GTFO.  I've avoided that area ever since and I take the chart notes as gospel, no matter how old the chart is.

Sunken trees last for ages - people assume they rot away but they don't.

There are places where they log drowned forests that are very old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Black Sox said:

Photo taken immediately before, tragically, the plane crashed into the lighthouse because the pilot was distracted by a boat on a rock.

I've never seen a float plane with rod holders before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2018 at 5:41 AM, Ajax said:

I'll never criticize the Great Lakes as being "puddles" or "just lakes."

Ya ain’t seen “the bay” until ya seen Hudson Bay... :-)

EDC35B9E-4627-490D-8CB1-61D9DC3CB373.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

There's a couple of target practice areas on the Chesapeake, also.

And you'd be amazed how many people either don't know, and charge forward boldly, or shrug and say "THey won't hit me." I've seen pictures of fishermen tied off to one of the warning signs when it was flashing. I would say Darwin in action but families tend to sue

FB- Doug

That's near Bloodsworth Island.  I grew up not far from there.  My uncle kept a J3 cub on a grass strip burned outta the marsh, and he'd have to call Pax River every time he wanted to go up to make sure the jets weren't running the range.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2018 at 1:25 PM, woahboy said:

I grew up in MI and I heard when I was younger that there is a small tide on Lake Superior. But I could be wrong. 

It's so small as to be unnoticed.  What most people think are tides is simply wind.  Sustained wind in one direction can make the water level rise by an easy 6 to 8 inches or more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ajax said:

Oops, correct. Thanks.

It's just that Venezuela seemed beyond your usual cruising grounds. That would warrant its own thread.

403882.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Ya ain’t seen “the bay” until ya seen Hudson Bay... :-)

EDC35B9E-4627-490D-8CB1-61D9DC3CB373.jpeg

No kidding - 3 times the area of the Black Sea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, KC375 said:

It's just that Venezuela seemed beyond your usual cruising grounds. That would warrant its own thread.

403882.jpg

Now that is what I call the front falling off.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Jackdaw said:

This pic taken by the left-seater of the Jayhawk seem to show the boat standing on its keel. Not a good sign for the boat; as if anything mattered at this point.

 

 

42823479_2210260479242441_4709604907634655232_n.jpg.44cd5f7111e30b332d90231d8b08afd1.jpg

Ah, so it was a slow-motion lawn darting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rimas approves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another knucklehead using a lighthouse as a waypoint.........well .......the GPS is pretty accurate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Another knucklehead using a lighthouse as a waypoint.........well .......the GPS is pretty accurate.

Guess that's why the entrance buoys at NYC are so small -- cheaper to replace when they get run over.  Imagine what would happen to a Lightship!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, PaulK said:

Guess that's why the entrance buoys at NYC are so small -- cheaper to replace when they get run over.  Imagine what would happen to a Lightship!

 

Anyone have news that the boat was safely extracted, or its it a new attraction for the SCUBA crowd?

- Stumbling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/6/2018 at 11:05 AM, PaulK said:

Guess that's why the entrance buoys at NYC are so small -- cheaper to replace when they get run over.  Imagine what would happen to a Lightship!

 

There was a light ship off NYC called "Ambrose" back in the sixties. Is it no longer there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They gave it to the South Street Seaport Museum, where I volunteered to chip paint.  We got to have lunch (sandwiches & sodas from a deli nearby) at the table in the Captain's cabin. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/7/2018 at 10:27 AM, stumblingthunder said:

Anyone have news that the boat was safely extracted, or its it a new attraction for the SCUBA crowd?

- Stumbling

 

Salvors sent from Bayfield WI (140nm) to the boat. Found keel and rudder broken off. Ordered to pump out all liquids and secure to shore. That location is totally exposed to the open lake. Its going to be fiberglass dust before the real witches show up in November. Right now blowing NE 33kts gusting 40kts. 14 foot wave height every 7 seconds. 

43570822_2333527866675131_6430162132033077248_o.thumb.jpg.63c2aca01da418099dcc9dec6e0d1745.jpg

43491402_2333527960008455_6131350442522705920_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Jackdaw said:

 

Salvors sent from Bayfield WI (140nm) to the boat. Found keel and rudder broken off. Ordered to pump out all liquids and secure to shore. That location is totally exposed to the open lake. Its going to be fiberglass dust before the real witches show up in November. Right now blowing NE 33kts gusting 40kts. 14 foot wave height every 7 seconds. 

 

43491402_2333527960008455_6131350442522705920_o.jpg

"Sous le Vent"

A name-change to "Sous la Mer" will be appropriate soon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the owner suffer some kind of medical emergency or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Did the owner suffer some kind of medical emergency or what?

According to the Salvors, 'This vessel had run hard aground in bad weather'.

The weather was bad, and the incident happened in pre-dawn darkness. Perhaps the light from the lighthouse factored, the sole person on the boat might have been confused as to what/where it was and if it offered safety.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jackdaw said:

According to the Salvors, 'This vessel had run hard aground in bad weather'.

The weather was bad, and the incident happened in pre-dawn darkness. Perhaps the light from the lighthouse factored, the sole person on the boat might have been confused as to what/where it was and if it offered safety.

 

Which maybe a chart would have told him otherwise. (trying and failing to not be judgmental) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard lots of stories over the years of people turning towards lights and foghorns in bad weather instead of turning away from them.

The illusion of security I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So how do you recover that boat?  Fill it with baloons and tow it to the nearest crane-liftable location so you can flatbed trailer it?  The costs will be enormous.

 

What's the owner likely to do?  Just attempt to abandon it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On October 4, 2018 at 3:13 PM, Grrr... said:

It's so small as to be unnoticed.  What most people think are tides is simply wind.  Sustained wind in one direction can make the water level rise by an easy 6 to 8 inches or more. 

Not from tides per se, but the water levels in the Great Lakes can be highly variable. Georgian Bay has been low for the past many years until a couple of years ago. Depending on the shoreline, a lot of cottages started to enjoy a whole lot more beach for a few years only to have it re-submerge. 

Last spring, L Ontario had water levels probably 5 feet above 'normal', leading to a lot of spring flooding in a lot of areas that persisted until probably mid July.  This spring, the water level was fairly 'normal'. I'd guestimate about a 2 ft drop from spring to fall on average here in L Ontario(this based on the scientific measurement of how much I have to adjust the ramp onto my floating dock).

Whether it's upstream rainfall, snowmelt, lack of freezing, too much freezing or a combo all factors, I've heard a lot of different theories...still not sure what to believe...

...anyway I hope things turned out OK for the guy who hit the rocks...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, fufkin said:

Not from tides per se, but the water levels in the Great Lakes can be highly variable. Georgian Bay has been low for the past many years until a couple of years ago. Depending on the shoreline, a lot of cottages started to enjoy a whole lot more beach for a few years only to have it re-submerge. 

Last spring, L Ontario had water levels probably 5 feet above 'normal', leading to a lot of spring flooding in a lot of areas that persisted until probably mid July.  This spring, the water level was fairly 'normal'. I'd guestimate about a 2 ft drop from spring to fall on average here in L Ontario(this based on the scientific measurement of how much I have to adjust the ramp onto my floating dock).

Whether it's upstream rainfall, snowmelt, lack of freezing, too much freezing or a combo all factors, I've heard a lot of different theories...still not sure what to believe...

...anyway I hope things turned out OK for the guy who hit the rocks...

Yeah that's a good point.  The water in lake St. Clair can vary by 2-3 feet (sometimes more) yearly.  It's dependent on snowfall, ice coverage, and flow from Huron and outspill to Erie.  Huron varies too, as my parent's disappearing beach on the northern end of the mitten shows.  From 100 foot beach to zero foot in 1 year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Grrr... said:

So how do you recover that boat?  Fill it with baloons and tow it to the nearest crane-liftable location so you can flatbed trailer it?  The costs will be enormous.

 

What's the owner likely to do?  Just attempt to abandon it?

Not sure there will anything left. Right now that little inlet is directly exposed to 12 foot waves from the NE.  There’s a gale warning on for most of Lake Superior right now. 

 

7518C9EE-A00D-4296-9CE1-F1ADFE66BDC1.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boat or whats left can be  pulled off by heavy lift helicoper or perhaps a barge & crane depending on depth alongside. 

Same way they pulled the boat off the Farallon's a few years back, and removed the Vestas from the shoal in the previous VOR. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, LionessRacing said:

Boat or whats left can be  pulled off by heavy lift helicoper or perhaps a barge & crane depending on depth alongside. 

Same way they pulled the boat off the Farallon's a few years back, and removed the Vestas from the shoal in the previous VOR. 

 

 

Could happen. I think the lift capacity of a Skycrane is about 20,000 lbs. That Catalina normally displaces about that, but not without her keel!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jackdaw said:

Not sure there will anything left. Right now that little inlet is directly exposed to 12 foot waves from the NE.  There’s a gale warning on for most of Lake Superior right now. 

 

7518C9EE-A00D-4296-9CE1-F1ADFE66BDC1.png

Superior it's said never gives up her dead when the gales of November come early.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just spoke to the fisherman that brought the owner back to the boat the next day to attempt a salvage. When they got there the keel and rudder were off and the boat was full of water and sitting on the bottom. Pumps could make no gain. Said the owner said he 'lost track of where he was'. No insurance. Just bought the boat in Duluth and against recommendations to not depart (for Delaware) he left. On the bricks less than 24 hours later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jackdaw said:

Just bought the boat in Duluth and against recommendations to not depart (for Delaware) he left. On the bricks less than 24 hours later.

Poor divil.  That's a high price to pay for his surfeit of enthusiasm over planning

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jackdaw said:

I just spoke to the fisherman that brought the owner back to the boat the next day to attempt a salvage. When they got there the keel and rudder were off and the boat was full of water and sitting on the bottom. Pumps could make no gain. Said the owner said he 'lost track of where he was'. No insurance. Just bought the boat in Duluth and against recommendations to not depart (for Delaware) he left. On the bricks less than 24 hours later.

But for the grace of God...

That sailor’s been protected in his way, and let’s hope he finds a less challenging pastime  

And by the way, what’s the route to Delaware from Duluth? Or have I missed a joke and the Delaware he was headed for is the ghost town on the Keewhatsit peninsula? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

But for the grace of God...

That sailor’s been protected in his way, and let’s hope he finds something less hazardous to do. 

And by the way, what’s the route to Delaware from Duluth?

lake superior-lake huron-lake stclair-lake erie-lake ontario-hudson canal-delaware...i guess.  it's a pretty long delivery!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, chester said:

lake superior-lake huron-lake stclair-lake erie-lake ontario-hudson canal-delaware...i guess.  it's a pretty long delivery!

No need to enter Lake Ontario.... the canal starts in Buffalo on Lake Erie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jackdaw said:

No need to enter Lake Ontario.... the canal starts in Buffalo on Lake Erie.

right, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Poor divil.  That's a high price to pay for his surfeit of enthusiasm over planning

I believe it's call Hubris. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Looks like he would have been pushing the timing for a run to the Atlantic since the Erie Canal closed for the season a couple of hours ago, according to https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.timesunion.com/news/amp/Canal-system-s-season-winds-down-13294301.php

 

The incident happened 10 days ago. He needed to hustle but probably would have made it. That’s probably why he ignored the advice to wait for a better weather window. 

In Bayfield we call Lake Superior ‘The Boss’. You always listen to The Boss.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No insurance? That boat looks a bit expensive to not insure.  If he gets billed for a cleanup his retirement wont look very rosey

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I've heard lots of stories over the years of people turning towards lights and foghorns in bad weather instead of turning away from them.

The illusion of security I suppose.

It’s a common Christian metaphor in the American Midwest.   I’ve heard a landlocked preacher explain how the lighthouse guides you to safe harbor.    People put them on their front walk as a welcoming gesture.   

844457FE-158B-41E7-8628-83B5952CDC2A.jpeg

4D689838-2B7D-49A4-A2B1-FF97D45FF0BA.jpeg

714B4798-C3F9-4753-A85B-98AA87BC6902.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Lark said:

It’s a common Christian metaphor in the American Midwest.   I’ve heard a landlocked preacher explain how the lighthouse guides you to safe harbor.    People put them on their front walk as a welcoming gesture.   

844457FE-158B-41E7-8628-83B5952CDC2A.jpeg

Well, he didn't drown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Lark said:

It’s a common Christian metaphor in the American Midwest.   I’ve heard a landlocked preacher explain how the lighthouse guides you to safe harbor.    People put them on their front walk as a welcoming gesture.  

They got it wrong.

image.png.40a3f2d1d721474ed850baa1d47d2437.pngimage.png.1b2293fdbc7b64995b8538e5ff3552a7.pngimage.png.c2989ac680e51e86c1b531a2e095e049.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:
4 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Poor divil.  That's a high price to pay for his surfeit of enthusiasm over planning

I believe it's call Hubris. ;)

Ah Sloopy, be kind.

All of us have had some moments of hubris.  Mostly they just lead to egg on face.  Sometimes we even manage to keep our follies hidden, so the egg is visible only to ourself.

But this man's misjudgement is likely to make a very big, long-term dent in his financial wellbeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

They got it wrong.

image.png.40a3f2d1d721474ed850baa1d47d2437.pngimage.png.1b2293fdbc7b64995b8538e5ff3552a7.pngimage.png.c2989ac680e51e86c1b531a2e095e049.png

Great photos.  Maybe your explanation would have worked where mine failed.   Shrug.   I didn’t try too hard, not caring that much.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

They got it wrong.

image.png.40a3f2d1d721474ed850baa1d47d2437.pngimage.png.1b2293fdbc7b64995b8538e5ff3552a7.pngimage.png.c2989ac680e51e86c1b531a2e095e049.png

 

Fun(?) story-

Some years ago, I entered my boat in the local Governor's Cup. About 3/4 of the way through, we were set upon by a storm. Chafed through the jib halyard, made a mess of things but we got sorted and resumed our course, but I digress...

We needed to round Point Lookout which is known for attracting boat groundings like moths to a flame. It was pitch black, raining sideways and we'd been pounding upwind all night and we were fairly sick of it and we were hoping to round the point and get off the wind a bit. My bride (then fiancee) was crewing with me and was also a park ranger at Point Lookout State Park. She'd seen her fair share of groundings and bad accidents at the point while working there.

I *really* wanted to make that rounding and get out of the bay so I was making a rather tight (but safe) rounding of the light, watching it blast out what looked like solid bars of white light thanks to the reflecting rain. My spouse was down below in the cabin, watching the navigation iPad and hollering up at me not to get too damned close to the light. "Local knowledge! Local knowledge!" she yelled up at me.   That was a shitty, shitty race for a variety of reasons. I knew that if she agreed to marry me after that, that it was meant to be.

I like that our arguments are about sailing and navigation rather than the checkbook or whether or not to have meatloaf for dinner. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Jackdaw said:
14 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Looks like he would have been pushing the timing for a run to the Atlantic since the Erie Canal closed for the season a couple of hours ago, according to https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.timesunion.com/news/amp/Canal-system-s-season-winds-down-13294301.php

 

The incident happened 10 days ago. He needed to hustle but probably would have made it. That’s probably why he ignored the advice to wait for a better weather window. 

In Bayfield we call Lake Superior ‘The Boss’. You always listen to The Boss.

Lake Superior is not like any other body of water I've sailed...... haven't been on it much but to me it "felt" ominous. Much more so than the ocean, not sure why. Cold water?

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/10/2018 at 10:12 AM, Jackdaw said:

Its going to be fiberglass dust before the real witches show up in November.

I wonder if anyone had the foresight to timelapse GoPro this process? I assume it's about over by now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites