EvaOdland

Herreshoff 12 1/2 - feet down

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I am pretty sure this is a Herreshoff 12 1/2  resting on the bottom of the mooring field in Milwaukee's McKinley Marina.

 

Screenshot from 2018-10-03 08-54-02.png

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Always sad.

Beautiful design.

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3rd boat to sink in the harbor this fall...

 

What are the salvage laws on a moored sunken boat? I suspect if one was raise it....it would be yours...? Or is it something with it connected to a bouy...?

probably cost quite less than the value of the boat to raise it....

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It's probably still owner's boat, unless it's "abandoned" which is a factual question not easily solved on a message board.  So it likely ain't yours for the taking.

And is it "in imminent peril" ?  Really slow peril, yeah but I wouldn't count on a salvavge award, nor try to raise her without someone's permission.

 

Too bad, I too love the H-12-1/2s, and raced them occasionally back in Mhead when owners were away and wanted to stay in the summer series.

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Lift it, dry it out, get 5 gallons of gas and a match and take care of it.;) 

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It is resting nicely on the bottom it seems....it will be a hazard to navigating the mooring field so I suspect it will be raised and removed rather quickly by  Milwaukee County who has authority over the inner harbor marina and mooring field (but not the actual moorings, maintenance of tackle is referred to a local salvage guy - has a dive boat with crane)

They may allow some time for owner to do so...

A 36 foot yawl sunk a few years back and it was hauled up rather quickly....

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41 minutes ago, EvaOdland said:

3rd boat to sink in the harbor this fall...

 

What are the salvage laws on a moored sunken boat? I suspect if one was raise it....it would be yours...? Or is it something with it connected to a bouy...?

probably cost quite less than the value of the boat to raise it....

Why not contact the harbor master and then the owner and offer to take it off their hands.

They may just be swelling the wood in the most aggressive way possible...

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1 hour ago, EvaOdland said:

I am pretty sure this is a Herreshoff 12 1/2  resting on the bottom of the mooring field in Milwaukee's McKinley Marina.

 

Screenshot from 2018-10-03 08-54-02.png

What's an H12 1/2 doing so far from home? Poor thing is probably lonely........................

FB- Doug

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5 minutes ago, WCB said:

Why not contact the harbor master and then the owner and offer to take it off their hands.

They may just be swelling the wood in the most aggressive way possible...

I know the Marina staff will not probably know who the owner is without some investigation. Though the marina is sort of in charge of the moorings they really don't do squat but give you a guys phone number....I am gonna ask around tonight.

I really do not need to take on another boat at this time...but never hurts to find out...

...it had a tent over the cockpit and I suspect it was flooded by the deluge of recent heavy rains this past Sunday.

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    The owner or a representative should take all means to mark the sunked boat and keep a light on it at night to prevent damage to other boats as the sunken boat is now deemed a hazard to navigation. Once that is done that maintains the owners rights to the boat and gives them some time to come up with a reasonable plan for its raising. 

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19 minutes ago, WCB said:

Why not contact the harbor master and then the owner and offer to take it off their hands.

They may just be swelling the wood in the most aggressive way possible...

I have seen restorers of Chris Craft type boats strip out the metal bits and sink them in the fresh water lakes as a way of holding the “project boat for restoring.” At a future date. A diver with a few lift  bags and a pumping out may be all the old girl needs...

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I thought it was an H12. My brother and I's first boat at age 7. Learned the joys of wooden boat maintenance on that boat. I'm surprised it sank to the bottom as most had flotation in the forward cutty(some also had it in the aft storage). It should at least be floating bow up. 

Not too terrible to re float it. Send a diver down with air bags for and aft. Only have to lift 750lbs (lead ballast) or so as the wood is buoyant. 

Nice examples command 20-30K.......worth saving even if its not so nice. 

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2 hours ago, EvaOdland said:

I am pretty sure this is a Herreshoff 12 1/2  resting on the bottom of the mooring field in Milwaukee's McKinley Marina.

 

Screenshot from 2018-10-03 08-54-02.png

I admire the owner for their innovative approach to getting the masthead ready for inspection. ;)

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*cough*

you know...I used to be a photo journalist with an actual newspaper of record....in my younger years...

Thank you.

Send money.

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Nah it was out of the water for a while. This is how you swell it all back up.

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Nah, the guy only left that little Island Sloop on the bottom for about three months after Maria. Barnacles were starting to grow on it! Mast was still sticking about 12 ft out of the water. 

Rob could just not bear the thought of his sweet little boat becoming a coral reef so in November of 2017 when flights began running to the region again they returned to St. John to help in recovery efforts and see if salvage might be possible. They were amazed at the hard working and resilient islanders, many who had also endured the cruelties of hurricane Maria that struck on the heals of Irma. This served to strengthen their resolve to return. With the help of an excellent salvage crew and the US Coast Guard they saw the Pepper lifted from the bottom of the bay, stripped of gear, covered in barnacles and filled with mud but, salvageable nonetheless.

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Odd way to string up a new halyard.     But I guess if you are afraid of heights, and don’t want to lower the rig. It would work.  

 

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Looks like she's back on her proper lines again. The skipper claims there was a fine catch of fish in her bilge, just in time for Friday.

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Stupid question, for no reason other than curiosity, but wouldn’t the insurance company trigger next steps or outline a course of action? 

That is all. Thank you. 

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2 hours ago, Peanut Butter said:

Stupid question, for no reason other than curiosity, but wouldn’t the insurance company trigger next steps or outline a course of action? 

That is all. Thank you. 

I would be surprised if it was insured. Pretty sturdy, no systems and it’s a day boat most of them are pretty inexpensive. If it’s a wood hull some time under water will probably fix the leak that sent it down to begin with.

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6 hours ago, Cape_taco12 said:

Pretty sturdy, no systems and it’s a day boat most of them are pretty inexpensive. 

^^ Crazy talk.  Inexpensive they are not. 

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To the untrained eye, anyway.

;)

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2 hours ago, Peanut Butter said:

Ok. So it’s a dinghy. Hard to tell from the pic...

Its not a dinghy. Its a keel boat that displaces 1500 lbs, 750 of which is lead ballast.(hence the reason it sank) Good examples can fetch 20-30K.

They are pretty highly prized by their owners and many have been passed down through many generations. Many times you will read that a nearly 100 year old boat has had one or two family ownership! 

Its likely to not have insurance as wooden boat insurance can be pretty pricey, and might be unobtanium if it doesn't survey out perfect.  

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Taken from the end of H-dock at McKinley Marina back in August 2015.

20150921_184817.thumb.jpg.7dc7d7a06db6b7042115d239471af47a.jpg

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Might be a White design -- the shallower draft adaptation of the 12. More likely than a 12 I'd say. Then again someone will know for sure.

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The 12's usually sink only when they first go in the water at the beginning of the season. At least that is what I have seen. Was in one when we splashed her one june and had to get her to a beach quickly before sinking. A little moisture made the wood swell up and she was sailing fast again in no time! And totally worth picking back up out of the mud.

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At the start of the season these often sink on their moorings but since the moorings are at most 5 ft deep it's not a problem. Then the wood swells up, they pump them out and they sail them for the season. Sometimes getting a little wet if it's a hot summer and the upper sides open up..

 

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On 10/9/2018 at 10:19 PM, fastyacht said:

Might be a White design -- the shallower draft adaptation of the 12. More likely than a 12 I'd say. Then again someone will know for sure.

Hard to tell from this picture, without looking at the transom hung rudder or inside the cockpit. I would tend to say its a real 12 1/2 as many Haven 12's are built without the molded bright sheer plank which makes them look quite different and not nearly as nice. This one in the pic has the molded sheer strake. 

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Update: It has been raised. So it will likely sail again and probably sink again.

I heard it is was not the first time it has sank.

lol

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We had a portable Rule bilge pump we would put in my 12 1/2 bilge just for when she launched until she was able to take up. When we first got her, my brother and I spent 6 hours hand pumping at the dock to keep her from sinking.  

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1 hour ago, EvaOdland said:

Update: It has been raised. So it will likely sail again and probably sink again.

I heard it is was not the first time it has sank.

lol

100+ year old Chesapeake Log Canoes are sunk/raised/raced again on a regular basis. Hope this neat piece of wood will enjoy the same. 

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