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Why I still love New Orleans..

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It's not just the old krewes parading uptown and on Canal, it's the new ones in Bywater, the Marigny, and the Quarter:

https://www.nola.com/mardi_gras_nola/2018/10/krewe_boheme_mardi_gras_new_or.html

And especially the Krewe of King James*, the "Super Bad Sex Machine Strollers"... ;-)

 

Plus decent sailing here too.  Put it on your bucket list??

 

*(Brown)

 

 

 

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Thanks for that!  I love NOLA... except in the summer.

I hitch hiked to my first Mardi Gras  in 1971, well, the first 10 days of parades at least. It got so crazy and the house I was crashing in on Esplanade got so crowded I moved on to Mobile the day before Fat Tuesday. Much quieter, traditional carnival there.

I went down again looking for diving work fall of '76. Spent the mornings dropping off donuts, coffees and resumes, the afternoons and evenings in the Quarter. Ran out of money (literally busted flat) and worked on a towboat till I saved enough money to move on.

When I worked in the Gulf in the early 80s I spent as much down time in the Quarter as possible while waiting to meet boats at The Jump. I've been to 3 or 4 Jazzfests and 2 years ago my wife and best friends surprised me with a 4 day trip to NO for my 65th birthday. 

The one place in the world I never get tired of, nor ever felt like I'd seen and done it all.

Love the new Krewes. Hope to get to see the early parades again some day.

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I like NO, but, not for the party scene - I like the music and food that abounds in almost every corner in the city and surrounding parrishes.  One of my favorites that I found when working down there in 2001 was Hymel's Family Restaurant, on Rte 18 near Hahnville, on the west bank of the River.  You could get a bowl of seafood gumbo and a bottomless iced-tea for $6, an oyster po-boy for $1 more.   

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The food is awesome. Went there on a liberty weekend with a shipmate who grew up just outside NO in 19.........well, never mind, lets just say a LONG time ago. That boy was so cajun he had a little cajun/french accent. His Mom cooked us some seriously good eats and there must have been 50 or more members of his family that showed up for the music and BBQ on the Saturday night. Those people can party......................

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1 hour ago, Willin' said:

Thanks for that!  I love NOLA... except in the summer.

I hitch hiked to my first Mardi Gras  in 1971, well, the first 10 days of parades at least. It got so crazy and the house I was crashing in on Esplanade got so crowded I moved on to Mobile the day before Fat Tuesday. Much quieter, traditional carnival there.

I went down again looking for diving work fall of '76. Spent the mornings dropping off donuts, coffees and resumes, the afternoons and evenings in the Quarter. Ran out of money (literally busted flat) and worked on a towboat till I saved enough money to move on.

When I worked in the Gulf in the early 80s I spent as much down time in the Quarter as possible while waiting to meet boats at The Jump. I've been to 3 or 4 Jazzfests and 2 years ago my wife and best friends surprised me with a 4 day trip to NO for my 65th birthday. 

The one place in the world I never get tired of, nor ever felt like I'd seen and done it all.

Love the new Krewes. Hope to get to see the early parades again some day.

The early parades are the best. While in school, we would always get out early to look for the tchoupitoulas indians and Pete Fountains half fast marching band followed by the Zulu parade. Never got a coconut though. 

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    When I was a fledgling boatbuilder in New Orleans, a good friend used to take me to a little 'gypsy restaurant' for the most amazing Creole meals. It was in the ladies home and didn't have a license and was more like a speakeasy bar. Strictly word of mouth an you best be careful as to who you revealed the secret location to. Apparently she had been doing these in home family style meals for years and people would knock on her door and ask if she were serving that particular night. Her answer if she was preparing anything was 'Mais Oui!', But Yes. The literal translation was more like 'Of Course' but that phrase sort of stuck and 'Mais Oui' became the whispered pass code that allowed entry into the small home that could be found if you were within a block just by the incredible cooking aromas wafting down the narrow alley.  No menu you just sat down and let her blow your mind with course after course of the penultimate courses from centuries of Creole cuisine. Not sure if she ever went legitimate but I doubt it as that would have probably ruined the mystique that surrounded the whole place. 

    I had a quick look on Google but this was the closest I could find. Hopefully she managed to avoid the authorities and eventually wrote this book.

512AKyMSIQL.jpg

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21 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

    When I was a fledgling boatbuilder in New Orleans, a good friend used to take me to a little 'gypsy restaurant' for the most amazing Creole meals. It was in the ladies home and didn't have a license and was more like a speakeasy bar. Strictly word of mouth an you best be careful as to who you revealed the secret location to. Apparently she had been doing these in home family style meals for years and people would knock on her door and ask if she were serving that particular night. Her answer if she was preparing anything was 'Mais Oui!', But Yes. The literal translation was more like 'Of Course' but that phrase sort of stuck and 'Mais Oui' became the whispered pass code that allowed entry into the small home that could be found if you were within a block just by the incredible cooking aromas wafting down the narrow alley.  No menu you just sat down and let her blow your mind with course after course of the penultimate courses from centuries of Creole cuisine. Not sure if she ever went legitimate but I doubt it as that would have probably ruined the mystique that surrounded the whole place. 

    I had a quick look on Google but this was the closest I could find. Hopefully she managed to avoid the authorities and eventually wrote this book.

Great story. Reminds me of eating at a place in Antigua which was someones home. We were staying on the south end of Dickensons Bay and diving with "Big Johns of Antigua" who had a dive shack at the north end of the bay so it was pretty convenient. The diving was meh......... But the place was called Nicoles I think and she cooked a couple times a week and you ate at tables on her front porch. It wasn't secret like you mentioned but it wasn't well known. She only cooked a couple nights a week, and only cooked a single dish that night. We heard about it through Big John. We called and got a "reservation" and ate a seafood paella on a beautiful evening with candles and string lites strung in the overhead of the porch. Had a similar dinner on someones porch on Grand Cayman. Some gal had a small sign on the main road to the East End where we did all our diving and it said "Home Cooked Dinner" and was pointing up a side road. Another excellent dinner cooked by nice folks. We always keep our eyes peeled for places like that when diving in the little latitudes. Never got sick, never been disappointed.

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Should add Halloween, one year was on a Saturday and awesome. Best costumes ever.  You get the party without the crazy crowds. 

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Spent a lot of time there post Katrina. Great food and music. Rode with a krewe once. Summer is miserable. Crime still a problem. 

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I think the most outrageous event I ever was part of in NO was the Hooker's Ball. Looks like it has been revived!

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That ad was for last year but it looks like they did a follow-up.

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     Lots of fun stuff if you are a bit weird!

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Diversity for sure!

No automatic alt text available.

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2 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

    When I was a fledgling boatbuilder in New Orleans, a good friend used to take me to a little 'gypsy restaurant' for the most amazing Creole meals. It was in the ladies home and didn't have a license and was more like a speakeasy bar. Strictly word of mouth an you best be careful as to who you revealed the secret location to. Apparently she had been doing these in home family style meals for years and people would knock on her door and ask if she were serving that particular night. Her answer if she was preparing anything was 'Mais Oui!', But Yes. The literal translation was more like 'Of Course' but that phrase sort of stuck and 'Mais Oui' became the whispered pass code that allowed entry into the small home that could be found if you were within a block just by the incredible cooking aromas wafting down the narrow alley.  No menu you just sat down and let her blow your mind with course after course of the penultimate courses from centuries of Creole cuisine. Not sure if she ever went legitimate but I doubt it as that would have probably ruined the mystique that surrounded the whole place. 

    I had a quick look on Google but this was the closest I could find. Hopefully she managed to avoid the authorities and eventually wrote this book.

512AKyMSIQL.jpg

Used to be a restaurant at about Burgundy and Conti or Bienville called Buster Holmes Restaurant. The building looked more like a shotgun shack with a long counter and a small kitchen. Buster always had a pot of red beans and a batch of perfectly cooked rice going and you could get a heaping plateful for $.35 with a ham bone or  chunk of fatty pork tossed on for an extra quarter. Until then I'd never heard of red beans and rice. Man, what I missed growing up poor in the north.

He'd been feeding the poor folks from the quarter to Treme for decades there. You could count on some crazy talk going on at that counter.

We went back for my first Jazzfest in the early nineties and sadly it was gone and nobody I met remembered the place.

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One of my best memories during my 2015 visit is listening to Emily Estrella sing her heart out with the Faux Barrio Billionaires at The Maison on Frenchmen Street.

Agreed the Halloween Parade is a most unique experience.

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I remember Buster’s. Banging screen door, mis-matched chairs and flea market linoleum tables. The menu was written in pencil on notebook paper. Beans and rice, trout meunière, grits and grillauds. I ordered the smothered rabbit and a Coke. Buster jerked his thumb over his shoulder and said “Cokes in the machine.” Years later I was working with a dude, told him my Buster’s story and he told me Buster was his Godfather.

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    The guy I got all those wild and crazy posters from above says this about himself,

PSA- I have fondled and groped many a man in many alcohol induced euphoric states in the US and abroad throughout my life, and I too have been groped and fondled by others. If any of you took my advances as offensive or abusive please tell me now, before I run for office. I will not deny nor confirm anything except that I may or may not have been a horny young man hopped up on booze,

 

     Got to admire the guy for his 'transparency'.

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2 hours ago, Raw baba said:

I remember Buster’s. Banging screen door, mis-matched chairs and flea market linoleum tables. The menu was written in pencil on notebook paper. Beans and rice, trout meunière, grits and grillauds. I ordered the smothered rabbit and a Coke. Buster jerked his thumb over his shoulder and said “Cokes in the machine.” Years later I was working with a dude, told him my Buster’s story and he told me Buster was his Godfather.

That story right there is good enough to welcome you with no tit show. Thanks !

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When I was enlisted in the Coon-Ass navy, I would drive out of NO through Jefferson Parish to catch a chopper out to the rigs. On the way to Dulac you go though Des Allemands, once Catfish Capital of the World. I stopped for gas at a country grocery store, filled up my VW squareback, went in to pay, and got myself a 12-inch fried catfish po’boy. The clerk asked if I would like a beer to go with that. “Why, yes I would,” I responded. He proceeded to take a paper quart carton and fill it from the keg under the counter. Back on the two lane road between the ditches, I ran through the gears, driving with my knees, po’boy in one hand, quart of beer in the other. Isn’t this a beautiful world!

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right click in video select "copy video url"  then right click and paste in your message.  Once in a great while it doesn't work (no idea there) but normally it's good to go. easy peasy.

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28 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

right click in video select "copy video url"  then right click and paste in your message.  Once in a great while it doesn't work (no idea there) but normally it's good to go. easy peasy.

Grew up there, learned early on that some of them didn't fit the traditional definition of 'lady'

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20 hours ago, Raw baba said:

When I was enlisted in the Coon-Ass navy, I would drive out of NO through Jefferson Parish to catch a chopper out to the rigs. On the way to Dulac you go though Des Allemands, once Catfish Capital of the World. I stopped for gas at a country grocery store, filled up my VW squareback, went in to pay, and got myself a 12-inch fried catfish po’boy. The clerk asked if I would like a beer to go with that. “Why, yes I would,” I responded. He proceeded to take a paper quart carton and fill it from the keg under the counter. Back on the two lane road between the ditches, I ran through the gears, driving with my knees, po’boy in one hand, quart of beer in the other. Isn’t this a beautiful world!

remember going into a 7-11 at 4am sunday morning and they were selling pints of liquor from behind the counter..  in sc the bars have to close at midnight on Sat because of stupid laws ..  i was amazed..

 

 

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19 hours ago, d'ranger said:

right click in video select "copy video url"  then right click and paste in your message.  Once in a great while it doesn't work (no idea there) but normally it's good to go. easy peasy.

shit I just copy and paste the link into the box..  but my browser forces https  which is in my links so that may be a difference

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I love NOLA, but I prefer it out of season.... I'm not a crowd kinda guy.

 The music, the food, the people..... All 100%, but I just don't do crowds. I'd love to hit jazz fest. My wife has been to at least a dozen, but I can't do that shit, so I just wait for the report...

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On 10/5/2018 at 7:37 PM, Mrleft8 said:

I love NOLA, but I prefer it out of season.... I'm not a crowd kinda guy.

 The music, the food, the people..... All 100%, but I just don't do crowds. I'd love to hit jazz fest. My wife has been to at least a dozen, but I can't do that shit, so I just wait for the report...

that's too bad, you've missed some really good music, it's a pain in the ass to get to, but we've had a friend who has worked the fest for decades, we ride with him and get in the back gate.   once you get inside it isn't too bad, if you stay away from the main stages the crowds aren't too bad, if you hit the small side stages you'll hear some really really good,  music.

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21 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

that's too bad, you've missed some really good music, it's a pain in the ass to get to, but we've had a friend who has worked the fest for decades, we ride with him and get in the back gate.   once you get inside it isn't too bad, if you stay away from the main stages the crowds aren't too bad, if you hit the small side stages you'll hear some really really good,  music.

Word.

While half the crowd was crammed in listening to Stevie Wonder  droning on endlessly about Love being in need of love today at one end, we caught Michael Franti and Spearhead, Randi Newman and John Prine at other stages with next to no crowds. I especially like the little local bands like Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes and some of the big brass bands, but you can see a lot of them any time on Frenchman Street.

Don't even think about getting close to Jimmy Buffet at Jazzfest.

The one thing I keep saying I have to do but still never have is hit the Rockin' Bowl. Next trip fer sure.

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My wife grew up there and virtually all of her (very extended) family lives there still, but most have moved out of Orleans Parish to Jefferson.  The crime in Orleans Parish is just terrible.  It's not that you're in danger all the time, but every day there increases the odds you will be a victim eventually.  It is grinding.  Her dad was a judge and her siblings are mainly attorneys.  All are VERY busy!

My son is a sophomore at Tulane, so we still get down there a ton.  As said, Mardi Gras and Jazz Fest are fun but can be exhausting.  Late March/Early April are the best times to visit for a taste of "normal" NO.  Also the Southern YC has a pretty extensive list of reciprocal agreements with other clubs.  Lotta fun and great fried chicken.

If you get uptown, my two favorite restaurants are Patois and Clancy's.  Worth the trip!

I have a love/hate relationship with the place.  Love the food, the music, the culture, the architecture, even love the way the place smells like it is slowly moldering away in the humidity.  Hate the crime, the politicians, the lack of any improvement of infrastructure and the post-Katrina self pity that still exists thirteen years after the storm. 

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    After getting held up at gunpoint while on the payphone just down the street from the "MAPLE LEAF BAR" on Oak Street, I moved just across the little canal that separates N.O. from Jefferson Parish into a little fishing slum known as BUCKTOWN. There was a little footbridge from the Marina district and West End Park that ran across the canal right behind the HARD SAILS loft. At the middle of the wooden planked bridge there was a graffiti sign that said 'Bucktown Bad Asses Rule' and warned against bringing any ill intent across the bridge into their turf.  Never had any problems over there other than getting shaken down by Sheriff Harry Lee's goons a couple times bicycling across that bridge with a good buzz.

Image result for sheriff lee jefferson parish

RIP

Image result for sheriff lee jefferson parish

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