mikewof

Beat the crap out of me, then trash my boat to within an inch of existence

Recommended Posts

A friend and fellow Anarchist wanted to start this thread. I didn't think it would be fair to him or to any of us. I don't want to promote my project, I'm more interested in feedback.

Same project as the "Nice Box" pix on the Mythical Front Page, I guess Scott threw me a bone, I have advertised with him in the past, SA advertising is money well-spent, and I plan to advertise with him again after Kickstarter is finished. Here's the link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mikewofsey/float-the-river-shoot-the-rapids-get-ripped-and-st?ref=user_menu

My original plan was to make an Opti for the current realities of the Optimist International organization. Unlike Rotary and some of the big dollar service organization, Optimists tend not to have the deep pockets they once had. I came up through the Optimists youth programs, they helped me, my local Optimists chapter is now mostly into bikes, they'll get a bike to any kid who needs one. Sailing is no longer a big part of the Optimist's mission. My original goal was to make a new kind of folding Opti that could ship through the USPS. I still have that goal, but it's a lot harder than I thought, mostly because of the box size and shape restrictions, but also because I'm gradually working my way there with tenders first.

My goal for this tender was a relatively inexpensive folding tender that would be lightweight enough to throw over your shoulder if you didn't want to leave an expensive RIB at a dock all day, or if you have a small cruiser and can't justify a RIB. In  that case, I wanted it to fold to the size of a carry-on bag, so it could be stowed pretty easily. Cost was a concern, I wanted them to be only a little more expensive than the relatively cheap inflatable boats that tend to last only a season or two due to punctures and abrasions. The Version 1.0 did okay, the Version 2.0 boat is a lot stronger, and we changed the gunnels to allow for a spray skirt and flotation. Eventually, I'm going to add the keel and rudder and collapsible mast and go for the mailable Opti, but we're not there yet.

I thought it might also be useful as a "trailer" for the regular tender, if you want to bring back a bunch of jerry cans of water to the mooring, or maybe to give the kids some fun paddling and rowing around the mooring. Any thoughts on some uses? Any ideas to improve the product? Any obvious weaknesses that I missed that I can possibly address in the next version?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm all in favor of crazy ideas and 'out of the box' thinking that puts you back in the box, so I'm not going to critique.  Besides, I'm the guy that built this:

31925057_666127800400263_604439264056731

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beat the crap out of me, then trash my boat...”

Ok, but only if you say “Yes Mistress, May I have another, Mistress?”

Jokes aside, I like the idea of a folding Opti and think you shouldn’t give up on it. So USPS is restricting your size I take it, what about UPS/FedEx/etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, OutofOffice said:

Beat the crap out of me, then trash my boat...”

Ok, but only if you say “Yes Mistress, May I have another, Mistress?”

Jokes aside, I like the idea of a folding Opti and think you shouldn’t give up on it. So USPS is restricting your size I take it, what about UPS/FedEx/etc?

I can fit the hull in the USPS box, I can fit the folding mast and boom in a USPS box. But I can't fit both in the same box, it's a two-boxer because of the way the USPS sets up their "ballon rate." Maybe not a deal-breaker, but the shipping then puts the cost of the boat way beyond the price of similar inflatables. I could fit both in the same box, but then I need some custom tooling for the mast, so maybe at some point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

For one who enjoys "messing about" in all manner of boat I think it's an interesting and relevant idea. Still obsessed with sailing it's not as convenient as it used to be so I often rely on kayaks or a rowing shell to get out on the water. I also have access to a bunch of ponds or small lakes that are stunning but difficult to access with conventional craft. This would be perfect to poke around these small bodies of water. Just hike in and out with it. It's kinda silly looking and not the most hydrodynamic form but it serves a function and that's cool.

Then there are the grandkids. Tiny boats and small bodies of water are perfect for exploring, doing stupid stuff and  developing an appreciation and sense of the water. Convenient, doesn't take up a lot of space and the price is right. I wouldn't pay a lot for this kind of toy but I think there's some value here.

Good luck. I might be foolish enough to buy one for the hell of it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have built a few small wooden  boats that required sitting on the floor, my problem with them was the inevitable swamp ass.

In the one sheet skiff I use occasionally I built a lightweight cedar slatted platform to get my ass two inches above the floor where my feet brought in water.  Basically a chair seat without legs.

Not a deal killer but if it was really being used as a tender it wont fly(or row I guess) due to swamp ass.  But a an accessory butt platform would go a long way in taking this idea from a toy to a tool.

 

Good luck, 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you elaborate on what the mast would have to be like to fit in the box with the boat? You mention custom tooling but what is the actual target in terms of length of the pieces?  Maybe what you need are custom machined parts, which are not as daunting as what we generally mean when we say custom tooling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, switters said:

I have built a few small wooden  boats that required sitting on the floor, my problem with them was the inevitable swamp ass.

In the one sheet skiff I use occasionally I built a lightweight cedar slatted platform to get my ass two inches above the floor where my feet brought in water.  Basically a chair seat without legs.

Not a deal killer but if it was really being used as a tender it wont fly(or row I guess) due to swamp ass.  But a an accessory butt platform would go a long way in taking this idea from a toy to a tool.

 

Good luck, 

Sweet, Ft. Collins. 

I use one of these folding seats from Coleman, it keeps the center of gravity pretty low, but gives a good seat back for extended rowing ...

71R1S426F0L._SL1500_.jpg

I found that I can also release the webbing and it opens all the way up for me to use it as a somewhat functional sleeping pad, when I was in Grand Mesa last year and wanted to pack light.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Can you elaborate on what the mast would have to be like to fit in the box with the boat? You mention custom tooling but what is the actual target in terms of length of the pieces?  Maybe what you need are custom machined parts, which are not as daunting as what we generally mean when we say custom tooling.

I need custom tooling because I would need to use some reduced I.D. collets. The maximum length of the mast sections if they are to fit in-box is about 28 inches, I would need a minimum of 3 segments, ideally tapered upward. That isn't a deal-breaker, but at the price point where I am, I need to use some thin-wall aluminum tubing, or maybe some less expensive rigid tubing. But several of the other connections between boom, FRP sail, and such would need to be custom. I can't really afford to machine these at this price point, they need to probably be injection-molded with a high density poly. I did a test Bermuda rig last year with the FRP, it worked well, it was light, fit the price.

You're right that custom-machined parts would work for a more expensive boat, but for a $150 or so sail-option, it's a no-go, and I need tooling to make a handful of small parts for about $10. I can't come anywhere close to that price with custom-machined fittings. Also, I'm too old to keep trying to make off-the-shelf stuff work. I know what fittings I need, I can make them with injection molding, but that tooling is so bloody expensive, the last time I made tooling for one of our solar desalination systems, I burned through $30 grand on aluminum thermoforming molds before a single part was cast. That's pocket change for some companies, not me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've all managed to politely not use the word origami yet....not like General Anarchy.....

Oh wait...:blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Norse Horse said:

We've all managed to politely not use the word origami yet....not like General Anarchy.....

Oh wait...:blink:

I was gonna bring that up, but decided against it as I didn't want to hurt woffsies ego, but since you took it there, it does seem like there is some competition...  

https://www.google.com/search?q=foldable+boats&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiD8IHMluvdAhWCy4MKHaJ3A6kQ_AUIDygC&biw=1874&bih=1019&dpr=2

 

Not to mention...

https://www.orukayak.com/

 

But he googled it already I bet.  He has found a niche market... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, shaggy said:

I was gonna bring that up, but decided against it as I didn't want to hurt woffsies ego, but since you took it there, it does seem like there is some competition...  

https://www.google.com/search?q=foldable+boats&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiD8IHMluvdAhWCy4MKHaJ3A6kQ_AUIDygC&biw=1874&bih=1019&dpr=2

 

Not to mention...

https://www.orukayak.com/

 

But he googled it already I bet.  He has found a niche market... :)

That Oru is a beautiful boat, I met a remarkably attractive finance exec who has one, she keeps it in the trunk of her car to paddle when the mood strikes. Actually, she lives right near you, by Cherry Creek Reservoir.

Different market though ... the Oru is a sea kayak, very long track. It's about twice the weight and size of our boat, and about $1200 more expensive. But that's the origami boat I would want for a longer ocean paddle if I couldn't have a skin and frame folder.

That Quickboat and Portaboat are fairly heavy, they're much bigger boats. Probably the Tucktec is our closest competition, that's a very nice boat at a good price. About 3x the weight of our's but it has a good hull shape.

The Backpack Barge is more of a playboat, spins easily, decent for rivers and lakes, the Expedition is good up to Class II. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re tooling, yes your kind of stuck with the problem of the volume you need to make to make it affordable. My usual response is to prototype the thing with machined parts and then it exists and you can see what the response is. This is a pretty specialized market though so it's a tough one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why make it folding? An Opti is already a box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love this idea Mike.   

I only wish there was a larger (volume) version.   I would like a solution to anchor out, and row ashore with the tent and gear for the night.  I'd essentially be looking for a transport for people dogs and stuff.  Multiple trips would be ok, just 400 lbs of weight capacity.

How is the material for abrasion resistance?  Here in the Pacific Northwest we are lacking in sandy soft beaches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just noticed that all these people in the video are sporting swimsuits. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2018 at 1:54 PM, mikewof said:

I can fit the hull in the USPS box, I can fit the folding mast and boom in a USPS box. But I can't fit both in the same box, it's a two-boxer because of the way the USPS sets up their "ballon rate." Maybe not a deal-breaker, but the shipping then puts the cost of the boat way beyond the price of similar inflatables. I could fit both in the same box, but then I need some custom tooling for the mast, so maybe at some point.

Where I live, the locals could fit a 40ft Aluminium mast into a shopping trolley in 15 minutes using nothing but a hammer and a blunt hacksaw,...............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, 10thTonner said:

I just noticed that all these people in the video are sporting swimsuits. 

Not me! I'm the guy running those Class II waters. I remain clothed because my advanced age has left me hideous and no longer beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Windward said:

Love this idea Mike.   

I only wish there was a larger (volume) version.   I would like a solution to anchor out, and row ashore with the tent and gear for the night.  I'd essentially be looking for a transport for people dogs and stuff.  Multiple trips would be ok, just 400 lbs of weight capacity.

How is the material for abrasion resistance?  Here in the Pacific Northwest we are lacking in sandy soft beaches.

Abrasion resistance is as good as any folder or inflatable can get, because of the double hull, the lack of air pressure and the type of plastic we use. I've run out through submerged barbed wire, river sand with broken glass and fairly sharp rocks, cosmetic scuffs only.

As to the weight, I plan to make a bigger version when I special order the larger sized plastic, but until then, the connecting straps are designed to hold external stabilizing sponsons which can up the cargo capacity an extra 50 lbs. or so.

Thanks for the feedback, I hadn't considered it as a barge for an anchor out, in that case, the user could add about $30 of components for the DIY sponsons, and a plywood floor and extend the capabilities, because that stuff would be fairly stowable in most cruisers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

REALLY dumb question Mike - but, anyway to adjust the fold and add a lateral thwart in front to ease the water entry while still staying within your cost/simplicity requirements?  I'm thinking something that looks a little more scow or skiff shaped up front. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are on the right track.  The worlds most popular surf craft was designed to be shipped by UPS.  Tom Morey had the same vision.  Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

REALLY dumb question Mike - but, anyway to adjust the fold and add a lateral thwart in front to ease the water entry while still staying within your cost/simplicity requirements?  I'm thinking something that looks a little more scow or skiff shaped up front. 

It's a good question. The sailing version has a thwart to stabilize the mast. Earlier versions had a completely enclosed bow, but they sacrificed a lot of strength and payload, I had to leave that design. I would like to be able to add a thwart somehow with a decent coaming for water entry in the rougher water. It would really add a lot of capability to the boat.

I like your idea of modifying the folds to maybe add that thwart and possibly the coaming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, guerdon said:

You are on the right track.  The worlds most popular surf craft was designed to be shipped by UPS.  Tom Morey had the same vision.  Good luck.

Thank you, that's part of the emerging reality in the era of Amazon. I read somewhere once that the Aquaglide inflatable sailboard is the most popular sailing craft ever in terms of total units sold. (I have an Aquaglide.)

A constant in my young life was when my dad constantly promised to start sailing with me in the reservoir near our house, back in the 1970s, we used to look at Lasers and similarly-priced boats at Breeze sailboats, which was a purpose-built sailboat building on Leetsdale, and the reality I didn't get was that the Laser and a trailer was beyond his salary at the time. I just wanted to sail.

Then the whole world fucking broke open, because Montgomery Ward started selling the plastic-over-foam Super Snarks. Suddenly, our sailing ambitions could be a reality, because we didn't need the trailer, or the hitch, and the whole boat was less than $100, if memory serves. (There were even free versions of the Snark from Kool cigarettes.) I pitched in some of my sidewalk shoveling money and we had a boat! We tied it on top of his Chevy Vega with the all-aluminum block, and sailed that little Super Snark all over Cherry Creek Reservoir. I couldn't have been a happier kid, sailing that little thing was the single most important part of my life from about age 12 to 16. I still have that Super Snark up on shelf in my garage, next to the Aquaglide.

I guess the corollary now to running around in that Super Snark, has as much to do with being able to store the boat when you live in an apartment, or don't even have a car. In my head, I picture a little folding sailboat that can ship through the mail, costs $199, but I still have a long way to go to get to that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The longest journey begins with a single step.  How about an inflatable international canoe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, guerdon said:

The longest journey begins with a single step.  How about an inflatable international canoe?

The difficulty with inflatables is that you're usually trying to find a balance between fabric density, weight and durability.

The reason a heavy duty RIB lasts so long is because it has a few hundred pounds of heavy duty material between the air and the water. On the other hand, a 2 lb. inflatable pack raft typically has fabric so thin that it can be mangled on an overhang or a sticker bush. 

I think that Feathercraft and the old Folbot had the right idea, they put their inflatable bladders inside the boat, protected by the Hypalon. I think that those can't be shipped too well anymore now that Amazon runs the post office. Heck, it costs me $100 to ship a little 12 lb. box to Australia now. It was about $35 just a few years ago. At some point, I'll have no choice but to work with Amazon again, they essentially own the direct shipping business these days.

Back in the 1970s, Kool Cigarettes could ship an entire styrofoam sailboat across the country for $6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike, 

Great thread and I hope no one beats you up.  Shipping will always be an issue.  Have you thought about regional builders that could do the easy cuts and maybe even meet the buyer halfway?  Clearly not a money-making endeavor for them but hey, I'm retired and have a truck and like to play with tools.  If I break even and it gets someone on the water, I'm happy. 

Thanks to this thread, I purchased two ORU kayaks this morning for my GF and me.  We have canoed a bunch this summer and each of us enjoys being on the water.  It's her xmas gift and she will love it.  The light weight and extreme portability means that they will be used extensively.

Don't let your dream die.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't read the contents of your post but based on the subject, all that can be arranged.   Let us know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2018 at 9:00 PM, mikewof said:

I need custom tooling because I would need to use some reduced I.D. collets. The maximum length of the mast sections if they are to fit in-box is about 28 inches, I would need a minimum of 3 segments, ideally tapered upward. That isn't a deal-breaker, but at the price point where I am, I need to use some thin-wall aluminum tubing, or maybe some less expensive rigid tubing. But several of the other connections between boom, FRP sail, and such would need to be custom. I can't really afford to machine these at this price point, they need to probably be injection-molded with a high density poly. I did a test Bermuda rig last year with the FRP, it worked well, it was light, fit the price.

You're right that custom-machined parts would work for a more expensive boat, but for a $150 or so sail-option, it's a no-go, and I need tooling to make a handful of small parts for about $10. I can't come anywhere close to that price with custom-machined fittings. Also, I'm too old to keep trying to make off-the-shelf stuff work. I know what fittings I need, I can make them with injection molding, but that tooling is so bloody expensive, the last time I made tooling for one of our solar desalination systems, I burned through $30 grand on aluminum thermoforming molds before a single part was cast. That's pocket change for some companies, not me.

Have you looked into 3D printing the parts needed?

I gather the materials they can print these days have progressed leaps and bounds to the stage where they can be used structurally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

Have you looked into 3D printing the parts needed?

I gather the materials they can print these days have progressed leaps and bounds to the stage where they can be used structurally.

I looked at a basic printer, the consumables are kind of expensive, about $10 or so for the four parts just for the plastic, not including the time and wear on the machine. If I can do the up front injection molding, those four parts would cost less than $2.

I still want to get a 3D printer though, they seem perfect for making thermoforming molds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

Hi Mike, 

Great thread and I hope no one beats you up.  Shipping will always be an issue.  Have you thought about regional builders that could do the easy cuts and maybe even meet the buyer halfway?  Clearly not a money-making endeavor for them but hey, I'm retired and have a truck and like to play with tools.  If I break even and it gets someone on the water, I'm happy. 

Thanks to this thread, I purchased two ORU kayaks this morning for my GF and me.  We have canoed a bunch this summer and each of us enjoys being on the water.  It's her xmas gift and she will love it.  The light weight and extreme portability means that they will be used extensively.

Don't let your dream die.  

Those Oru boats seem good, if you enjoy them, consider going all the way to the Feathercraft K series, they're made in Canada ... every bit as tough as the Kleppers, but lighter, and better materials I think.

I always paddled Folbots for folders, but they closed their doors a few years ago.

To your thoughts with trucking, that would be perfect for good ol' Optis. There are hundreds of underserved communities that could get Optimist International sailing programs, if the source of boats were affordable and reliable. Unlike the 1950s, it seems there just aren't that many ham'n'egg boat carpenters anymore to build two sheet boats.

Yeah, the Bic O'Pens are better hulls, no bailing, but the Optis are potentially much cheaper. 

I'll tell you something odd though ... for my boats, they were designed backwards from the maximum possible USPS shippable box size that doesn't go into Balloon rate. The dimensions of the boat, the folds, the  structural work, it was all designed to fit into that box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@mikewof you may want to see Falcon Sails' setup if you're not already familiar with it.  The owner is a very nice guy, huge into paddling and sail/paddling; I have very willingly spent hours of my life talking with him about cloth.  Anyways, I wonder if you might be able to use some of the same parts he is using for your rig.  He did everything custom, obviously much higher price point for his rig, but perhaps with additional volume he might share and save both of you costs.

https://www.falconsails.com/

Dig your project, keep it up mate!

And pm me when you get to the point where you need some sailcloth.  :D;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, nlmasopust said:

@mikewof you may want to see Falcon Sails' setup if you're not already familiar with it.  The owner is a very nice guy, huge into paddling and sail/paddling; I have very willingly spent hours of my life talking with him about cloth.  Anyways, I wonder if you might be able to use some of the same parts he is using for your rig.  He did everything custom, obviously much higher price point for his rig, but perhaps with additional volume he might share and save both of you costs.

https://www.falconsails.com/

Dig your project, keep it up mate!

And pm me when you get to the point where you need some sailcloth.  :D;) 

Woah ... That might work right off the shelf with my own mast step. This is a terrific lead, thank you! I've seen lots of downwind sails, but that's an actual rig.

I just bought a little 1.4 hp outboard for the dinghy as a demo, maybe I can do the same with that rig and sail. I've found that with very short waterlines of displacement hulls, small sails do much better than the D/L would suggest, especially in light air ... brings new meaning to "3 knot shit box." Is the name 3KSB taken for a product line?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/6/2018 at 10:11 PM, Cal20sailor said:

Hi Mike, 

Great thread and I hope no one beats you up.  Shipping will always be an issue.  Have you thought about regional builders that could do the easy cuts and maybe even meet the buyer halfway?  Clearly not a money-making endeavor for them but hey, I'm retired and have a truck and like to play with tools.  If I break even and it gets someone on the water, I'm happy. 

Thanks to this thread, I purchased two ORU kayaks this morning for my GF and me.  We have canoed a bunch this summer and each of us enjoys being on the water.  It's her xmas gift and she will love it.  The light weight and extreme portability means that they will be used extensively.

Don't let your dream die.  

Did you get your Oru kayaks yet? They're remarkable boats. Is your intention to stow them aboard?

Please post photos when you get them, perhaps some other anarchists could benefit. If you didn't order the bow and stern flotation yet, go to Amazon to buy the ones not branded by Oru, they're much cheaper, same ultrasonic welding fingerprint as the Seveylors, I'm quite sure that they're made on the same assembly line.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you nominated it for admiration? Could be a contender.

1514035714_ScreenShot2018-10-09at1_04_38PM.png.3a1a24f4c0f95989187ac2a8496bc990.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/8/2018 at 8:14 PM, mikewof said:

Woah ... That might work right off the shelf with my own mast step. This is a terrific lead, thank you! I've seen lots of downwind sails, but that's an actual rig.

I just bought a little 1.4 hp outboard for the dinghy as a demo, maybe I can do the same with that rig and sail. I've found that with very short waterlines of displacement hulls, small sails do much better than the D/L would suggest, especially in light air ... brings new meaning to "3 knot shit box." Is the name 3KSB taken for a product line?

No Problem!  Hope it works out.  The owner says even without a daggerboard or leeboard he can actually get upwind reasonably well with that rig on a long kayak.  Certainly not pointing 30 degrees off the wind or anything, but nearly 60 degrees is doable.  That's better than some cruising boats!  :P  I imagine any decent size waves push that number even higher...  but paddling straight upwind would be much faster VMG-wise in almost all cases anyways.

Our good man from CA Dylan Winter made a neat little boxy-like boat that used an Opti rig and just using the (very) hard chine could get upwind a little as well.  Suspect your box might act similarly.

Yes, long water lines in light wind just mean more wetted surface to drag around.  I regularly beat much longer boats with my little 25' keelboat in light air.

 

I agree with Iasal above...  probably should submit your creation for admiration by the society.  I think it's definitely a contender.  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, nlmasopust said:

No Problem!  Hope it works out.  The owner says even without a daggerboard or leeboard he can actually get upwind reasonably well with that rig on a long kayak.  Certainly not pointing 30 degrees off the wind or anything, but nearly 60 degrees is doable.  That's better than some cruising boats!  :P  I imagine any decent size waves push that number even higher...  but paddling straight upwind would be much faster VMG-wise in almost all cases anyways.

Our good man from CA Dylan Winter made a neat little boxy-like boat that used an Opti rig and just using the (very) hard chine could get upwind a little as well.  Suspect your box might act similarly.

Yes, long water lines in light wind just mean more wetted surface to drag around.  I regularly beat much longer boats with my little 25' keelboat in light air.

 

I agree with Iasal above...  probably should submit your creation for admiration by the society.  I think it's definitely a contender.  :D

The sailing version has a keel and rudder, that was the tractable part of the design, the intractable part was integrating the rig. But with your friend's rig, I think I can see a path forward. The first snow just fell here, so now I officially have 5 months to figure out the design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Wofsey - ya REALLY need to work on the spray skirt.... 

That's a pre-production prototype. Still, they ain't easy to make, because the seams between the deck skirt and the riser are all internal. Can't use the seaming machine too well for that, they have to be hand-seamed. Sucks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, The Q said:

Sailing Inflatable..

The Tinker Traveller.

See the source image

At one point it was even claimed to be useable as a life raft..

http://www.tinkerowners.org.uk/p03.htm

part of my childhood.

I think ours was a tramp, but first job when we hit a port while cruising was to get it out and rig it up so we could go explore away from my parents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that inflatable. One thing that just regularly amazed me about that thing and even the newer Aquaglide, was how they were able to get a relatively stable mast step, with all that torque form the rig, and the whole thing was essentially supported by some mildly pressurized air.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike, 

The kayaks arrived yesterday and haven't been unpacked or assembled.  I will take pics and let you know.  So far, very impressed by the company and the little I can see without unfolding.  Should be perfect for our plans.  Take care.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now