Benjaminw

Need help with an old Flying Dutchman.

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Hello, I am new to this form and to the Flying Dutchman. I have recently purchased an old FD, and it seems to be a semi good candidate for a resto project (in my eyes). I bought it for $150 (cad) on a good trailer with 5 sails and spars, so at the very least I have gotten a good trailer. The boat has no lines on it, and I doubt the previous owner ever sailed it as he didn’t have many answers for me. The boat needs some work; fibreglass, paint, new teakwood, rigging, and a center board. I was wondering if anyone had information on the type of boat it is, rigging, upgrades, is it a lost cause? My goal is to have a fun boat to shred, and maybe occasional race on my lake (very informal racing). I do have some boat experience, I have fixed up and rigged out an older albacore to what is now a respectable cottage lake racer. I have also fixed a separate albacore, and an older cl16, so I know (for the most part) my way around a boat. I can post more pics if required, All responses appreciated.

cheers, ben.

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Hard to tell from these pictures, but almost every photo of an FD that I find online seems to show an aft deck.  International FD rules call for a maximum cockpit area of 4.2 square meters. Is this cockpit bigger than that?  The photos don't let us see the partners, the forward bulkhead (maybe just because it's dark under there) or give us a good idea of the jib tack fitting's location. Class rules dictate these items and also call for the aft heel of the mast to be 3600mm from the transom, measured along the deck line. Does this boat measure in? 

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image.thumb.png.1f4b9307eb59d3d5105246eb8b09e521.pngplenty of FD's around without aft deck, some of them as good looking as this one. No particular  reason yours should be a lost cause apart from work and money to spend!

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Worth spending time and some cash on. They are seriously quick and fun to sail especially on a run with a spi. 2 up on trapezes  WOO HOO

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 Boat is definitely an FD, from my brief research it may be a dubbam? it dose not have mast partners, from pictures I’ve seen they look like they were made of aluminum for this boat, could be recreated it seems. I’ll get better pics tomorrow.

thanks.

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I think PaulK is out to lunch worrying about class rules. you want a cottage boat, not an Olympic boat.

Your work is cut out for you. There's a lot to do here.

I would start by trying to step the mast. Can you put it up? Is there even a step to put it into? Is there chainplates etc, to fasten the shrouds and forestay to? If you have that much, well there is hope. If you don't have that much going on, well.............

For cockpit layout etc, you have formidable challenges, notably the seeming absence of any hardware at all. FD's in their latest form are notoriously complex. You have no need of the degree of complexity that a modern FD would have. We can tell the vintage by that winch in the middle of the cockpit giving it away as mid to late 60's.

I would personally fill it with fuel and burn it at a good party, but if you're more sporting than me you want to work towards a few basic systems to get sailing.

Jib sheet system, main sheet system, boom vang of some kind, Hiking straps, trapeze for one (Mast not designed for two up on the wire), centerboard control / up / down. Those would basic systems to implement to get on the water. Of the modern systems you don't really need I would include all the adjustable shrouds and forestay business. Being able to drop in 18" of rake half way up a leg is fun but not critical for your mission. Likewise you could use substantially simpler systems for jib sheeting and main sheeting. Such as use a split mainsheet bridle instead of an expensive traveler.

First off try to put the rig up and apply some rig tension, if the boat doesn't fold in half instantly, move it into the shed and start the work of refurbishing the hull. Sand everything down to get the shite off, take it to an autobody shop and have them shoot it with a few coats of primer, then 2-3 coats of high hide gloss white. You can get fancy with a racing stripe later.

You could take off the wood, refinish it, reinstall. Unless its totally rotted out. Teak ain't cheap or easy to find in good lengths these days, reuse what you can.

For a centerboard, I would shop around on used boat sites in Europe or look at the finger lakes in Northern NY state. if you're in NA. There's not too many classes that have boards that look like an FD board, which are squat little things. It'll be an inch thick at the fattest part and it'll be a centerboard, not a dagger board, so it rotates around a pin just like your Albacore.

You don't have a chute launcher tube on that boat, so you'll be building some bags to pop the kite into, if and when you get that far.

If you're like me and you have buckets and boxes of old Harken gear laying about, rigging it up should be no problem. If you're buying new from the shop and rigging it even half way as complex as a new boat you'll be in for $2,000 in blocks and line. Plus you'll end up buying a half dozen inspection port assemblies so you can put some holes in the boat to allow you to get inside the boat for backing plates for all that new hardware.

If I had to guess, I'd say you have $4000-$6000 to get to the water in a serviceable condition plus about a minimum of 400 hours of labor to get it spiffy enough to be seen in.

If I was being economical, I might find a boat of similar scale and comportment and simply lift and adapt most of the systems from it to this boat. Old 470's might work, Lightnings etc. Find one in the tip and strip it. Go full Frankenstein.

Before I did all that I would look inside to make sure the main bulkheads are still bonded to what they are supposed to be bonded to like the hull and deck. If they are shot, well, do you still have that can of Gasoline?

Full disclosure, I owned and raced an FD for about 3-4 years. Wonderful complex, sophisticated machines that are an absolute blast to sail, especially upwind in a big breeze with a big guy on the wire. they are most fun when everything works well and its easy to change gears in the breeze (Complex fussy boat). But they're a fucking PITA to maintain and operate like any big long complex boat.

Where in Canadistan are you?

 

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