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Murphness

Incredible Workshop Access - What to Make?

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I've just been given access to an incredible metal/wood working workshop with essentially any tool I need. CNC machines, 4D router, Lathes, Welding equipment and metal fab, 3D printers, etc...

I'm doing some 3D modeling software training right now to I can get up to speed with some of the CAD operated machines. I'm very familiar with woodworking tools already.

What would you make for your boat if you had this opportunity?

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Servo pendulum self steering gear. 

Which I did. 

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2 minutes ago, TQA said:

Servo pendulum self steering gear. 

Which I did. 

Get the servo and self steering gear part, but where does the pendulum fit in?

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11 minutes ago, Murphness said:

Get the servo and self steering gear part, but where does the pendulum fit in?

Pendulum is the steering oar which is turned by the vane.

https://youtu.be/gGHdr-VGbzs

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I have access to a lot of the same stuff, but pretty limited time.

One thing that I've thought would be fun to make with access to a large router is a foam core rowing/sailing dinghy.  Cut the foam on the router, do the fiberglass by hand.

I did make a custom electrical panel for my old boat using a CNC mill.  The space for it in the boat didn't work well with any standard production sizes, and making my own let me get a much higher breaker density in a reasonably small space:

130727238953806564-L.jpg 

I mostly end up making tons of small parts.  Like I made simple but nice quick release hardware for holding a cloth drink/ipad holder (also homemade) across the back of our cockpit.  I've used the lathe to make custom sheaves and bushings.  I 3D printed some cam cleat holders that clamp to the pulpit to hold our spin sheets out of the way when we're going upwind.  

DDW has a lot of impressive stuff if you go browse his blog.  

Learn the machines and ideas will come to you.  I can't guarantee that time will.

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Some custom blocks - sideplates with your boat name engraved on them?

 

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8 hours ago, Zonker said:

Some custom blocks - sideplates with your boat name engraved on them?

 

OOOh that brings back memories. In 1982 I was working at Loughborough College as part of a scheme to help local engineering companies with the introduction of CAD. 

I labored for a month or so to get a 5 axis Bridgeport mill to cut my name on a plaque. AutoCad v 5 I think and a really clunky post processor.  

No metal was harmed by me in those days as they only let me cut oasis foam with a plastic cutter. I had to watch with my hand on the emergency stop button in case the cutting head took off through the table. 

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You had Autocad 5! I started with version 2.16. Loaded from 2 x 360K floppy discs. No mouse. No digitizer. You used the arrow keys to move the cursor on the screen and tapped the period button to jump faster or slower.

I wrote G code by hand. It was tricky. We had to carve out a gear with a name on top. Lots of ugly bits of aluminum in the bin.

>Edit<    ALSO had to walk uphill, in the snow, both ways, to university. In bare feet and a swimsuit.  Well shorts and a Hawaiin shirt.

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17 hours ago, Zonker said:

You had Autocad 5! I started with version 2.16. Loaded from 2 x 360K floppy discs. No mouse. No digitizer. You used the arrow keys to move the cursor on the screen and tapped the period button to jump faster or slower.

I wrote G code by hand. It was tricky. We had to carve out a gear with a name on top. Lots of ugly bits of aluminum in the bin.

>Edit<    ALSO had to walk uphill, in the snow, both ways, to university. In bare feet and a swimsuit.  Well shorts and a Hawaiin shirt.

I might have been wrong about the version number it is a long time ago however we did get the very latest kit from the software/hardware manufacturers and we had developers working in house on updates. We also had people from companies like RR aero and Brush coming in on courses and onsite trials. The goal was to develop packages that would go from screen to cutting metal in one integrated package.

I find it interesting that there are still people out there learning G code from scratch and using it. 

I was the 800 lb gorilla wheeled in to ask the awkward questions.

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Ahh just had one of my ex pupils from the Brush correct me. I cam in at the time they were migrating from MicroCad to AutoCad 1 and as I am pretty sure of the year being 1982 I guess it must have been version 1

I do remember it as being incredibly buggy and having one of the most unfriendly command line interfaces.

What was really sad was that 20 years later there were times I would still regress to the command line interface teaching AutoCad 2000.

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On 10/5/2018 at 2:20 PM, Zonker said:

You had Autocad 5! I started with version 2.16. Loaded from 2 x 360K floppy discs. No mouse. No digitizer. You used the arrow keys to move the cursor on the screen and tapped the period button to jump faster or slower.

I wrote G code by hand. It was tricky. We had to carve out a gear with a name on top. Lots of ugly bits of aluminum in the bin.

>Edit<    ALSO had to walk uphill, in the snow, both ways, to university. In bare feet and a swimsuit.  Well shorts and a Hawaiin shirt.

Ahhhh G code.  Morbidelli Author 504.  Wood not metal.

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On 10/4/2018 at 8:26 AM, Murphness said:

I've just been given access to an incredible metal/wood working workshop with essentially any tool I need. CNC machines, 4D router, Lathes, Welding equipment and metal fab, 3D printers, etc...

I'm doing some 3D modeling software training right now to I can get up to speed with some of the CAD operated machines. I'm very familiar with woodworking tools already.

What would you make for your boat if you had this opportunity?

 

decent cupholders of course..

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On 10/4/2018 at 7:26 AM, Murphness said:

I've just been given access to an incredible metal/wood working workshop with essentially any tool I need. CNC machines, 4D router, Lathes, Welding equipment and metal fab, 3D printers, etc...

I'm doing some 3D modeling software training right now to I can get up to speed with some of the CAD operated machines. I'm very familiar with woodworking tools already.

What would you make for your boat if you had this opportunity?

A carbon FRP ATM, with no 3D FEEs.

 

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I would make some rando on SA forums some new teak companionway doors for their new-used S2 11.0....just for an easy starter...

:cough:

 

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On 10/4/2018 at 8:21 AM, TQA said:

Servo pendulum self steering gear. 

Which I did. 

ooooohhh, that would be awesome

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Solid boom vang.  Pretty easy to make with a manual mill and lathe, and expensive as fck to buy.

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On 10/11/2018 at 12:41 PM, Grrr... said:

Solid boom vang.  Pretty easy to make with a manual mill and lathe, and expensive as fck to buy.

Good idea. The type with a spring on the inside?

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1 hour ago, Murphness said:

Good idea. The type with a spring on the inside?

Thanks!  Yeah, the one with an internal spring.  It's even easy to turn the end pulley on a lathe and insert a bronze bushing. HDPE inserts for the slides.  Aluminum if you want less weight, stainless if you want gleaming and pretty.  You can probably go to a local chandalry to get dimensions too.

Though I have to admit it wasn't my idea.  I spent a couple weeks doing this with my father in a friends workshop 30 years ago.

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