Sign in to follow this  
1215

J24: Anyone ever DIY pull a deck?

Recommended Posts

Thinking about fixing up a J24. The deck is trashed but the boat can be saved (with considerable effort). 

It's an old boat and it needs everything. Literally everything. 

How do you pull a soft deck off a boat? Do I just build a  female cradle on the top of the boat then drill through and bolt the deck to the cradle, undo all the deck/hull fasteners and have at it? (get a few friends and maybe have a hoist on hand and pull off the deck) 

Then what? If I make sure the cradle is square and solid can I fix the deck up-side down on the cradle or should I fix the hull first then put the deck back on and deal with the wet balsa from above? 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's so trashed that it can't be fixed in place, I would chainsaw the boat into little chunks and then spread them throughout the country to make it harder for them to reassemble themselves.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't take a deck off to recore it - you'll have a bitch of a time keeping everything straight & aligned. It actually would likely be impossible on a boat as lightly built as that. Decks are frequently installed while the hull is still in the mould for that very reason.

Cut the top skin off in sections and replace the core as you go. Put a layer of glass down on each section as you go and when it's all done, prep it and lay a full layer of glass over it all - that should be plenty for a J/24.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In less than 1 minute I found a pile of J/24's on the class site for +-$5k. Old boats in decent condition. As good or better than you will get your d_ckless hull. Just the material alone to recore a deck would make me buy another boat. Oh wait. I forget "it needs everything". Just a 4hp outboard would cost $1000.

You live in the States. You live in RI the home of the J/24. Bury it in the J/Boat cemetery. Its the size of Arlington. In the fall, when there are no leaves on the trees, you can see the masts from 195. In the spring, you can smell the rotting balsa core miles away. Definitely worth a visit.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy crap you're right.  The world (or at least the class website classifieds) are full of very decent $5000 boats.  Gives a man unreasonable thoughts.

If you are capable of earning more than 5 cents and hour you're crazy for taking on that project when there are so many cheap boats available

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sell it to a Mexican Drug Cartel as a drug Mule boat.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are at the right time in  the J 24

time line. There are many bargains many J 24s begging for a new home

a new set of sails will set you back $5000.  Time to shoot the old girl and start anew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Friends don’t let friends take decks off old boats.

having said that... we did one for sentimental reasons... the ONLY  reason !!! It was to honor the memory of a dead friend and it was the right thing to do....

it was in NO WAY the sensible economic decision. 

1. If you are going to let the deckless  hull sit for a month, PLAN AHEAD!!! Make a couple cross braces and bolt them to the inturned  flanges so the hull wont sag too much. ( we didn’t and it took an extra hour to fit the repaired deck back in place) 

2. Before you remove the deck, make a cradle on top of it so you can set the flipped deck on that cradle. Be simple. Make a 20 foot by six foot plywood rectangle. Attach some stuff to it so it sits solidly on the deck. Put in a few supports so the deck won’t sag when you flip that deck and set it on the cradle. 

3. Take the hose clamps  off the cockpit drains. 

4. Cut the fiberglass that ties the cockpit support web to the cockpit. 

5. If your deck is glassed to the main bulkheads, cut it loose. 

6. Remove the toerails which are held on with # 10 machine screws. 

7. Remove the 1/4 inch machine screws That hold the deck to the hull. 

8. If you have removed the traveler put it back on 

9. Tie adjustsble  lines from every lifting point you can think of to a hoist. A big long spreader bar or a second hoist makes the lifting task easier. 

Hint: use the bow cleat, cross bar (solid looking 2x4)  under front hatch, cross bar under mast hole,  tie to the traveler, use Genoa cars...

10. Lift a bit with the hoist(s) and adjust the lifting lines sonthey each are lifting. 

11. Set the deck down close to the floor 

12. Get about six reasonably strong guys and using the brains with which you were born, flip the deck over and set it on your pre built deck cradle 

13. Carefully cut off the lower skin. 

14. Scrape and grind away all that composted balsa. 

15. Install new balsa  ( We bought balsa 2 x 4 and sliced theM like  bread. We dipped each block in CATALYZED iso resin and set them in place one by one. It took two guys less than two hours to do the entire deck and we know there is no way in hell our sealed blocks will ever rot. 

16. Prepare the surface and Lay on the appropriate amount of fiberglass 

17, Flip the deck over and reinstall it. You should be able to use  the same holes. 

18. Install some toerails  and fittings

19. Put up the mast 

20. Launch

21. Go sailing 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this