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WANDERLUST

J105 light winds

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Can someone help me about sailing in light winds? I have raced this sundays for the first time in really light winds. Configuration was jib 24 mts ans main 32 meters. The boat was not working at all.

I also have a 150 genoa 35 meters and a bigger jib 26 meters. Can somebody tell me if 26 mts could be enought?

 

the boat in 10 knots of breeze is really fast but in light winds (5knots) does not work at all.

the circuit was a triangle and in that breeze the A2 does not work on the downwing length. The second round I tried to put the masthead halyard and it worked.

DC111B32-3E62-42E3-B53B-FCEC6ED255C6.jpeg

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In 5kts on a J/105, you should have at least a case of beer on board.

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Hi

J105 has the reputation of being "sticky" in very light breeze (<5 kts or so), but I have won PHRF races in that stuff before against good competitors. Here's my $0.02 on the best approach. :

Before you leave the dock - do a weight-nazi survey and ditch anything you don't need. Also, ditch the crew if you can - sail 2-up.

1. Upwind -

a) stay on the breeze. It's very tempting to try to get the boat moving by footing around the racecourse, but once you are up to speed, make sure that you are pointing properly.

b) Barberhaul the jib to close the slot a little. You can't use barberhaulers per OD rule, but you can use the lazy sheet. 

c) Let the jib car back - don't totally close the slot up high. Also, you need some twist

d) Over-sheet the boom with the traveler - above centerline is fine, but let the leech fall off a bit to provide twist

e) Don't let too much outhaul off or make the sails too powerful and draggy - blade things out a bit to keep flow attached

f) Have someone on the jib keeping it trimmed all the time so you don't need to move the rudder quickly during lifts or knocks. Try to use sail trim rather than boat angle to the wind as much as possible

g) leeward heel of 5 degrees or so. Weight forward so the transom is not dragging too much water around 

Downwind

a) if the kite is a floppy rag, you are better off flying a jib

b) If you have the kite up and you are catching zephyrs, drive sitting to leeward. Hold the kite sheet in one hand (outboard of all of the blocks etc - directly off the kite) and the wheel in the other. You'll be surprised how sensitive you can get to the smallest puffs and pressure. You need long arms (I'm 6'2" and built like a gibbon, so that helps). Having to worry about both the kite and driving helps you to maintain focus and you can react better than trying to tell a kit trimmer what to do when they likely zoned out half an hour ago.

c) Crew weight to leeward and forward. Get the transom out of the water. 

d) Don't ease the main too much. In these conditions you are probably at 75 to 85 degrees apparent, so sheet in and twist off.

 

I basically reject the idea that J105s don't work in light air, but it does take some practice.

 

 

 

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I sailed on a J/105 for several years. In light air with the OD jib, the patience required to sail well was beyond me (hated it). An overlapping genoa and a pristine bottom make a huge difference, but not allowed in OD anywhere I know of. Downwind you just actively sail hotter angles to keep moving, though it's challenging getting that exactly right too.

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We pay attention to the polars on pretty much every point of sail. 

Often find that the hot angles downwind may take your boat speed above them but that should tell you to soak the nose down as much as you can.  Need to really pay attention to the weight distribution.  Windward heel in a breeze, leeward weight forward or evenly displaced in light air.  It's a fine line and your speedo will tell you when you are slow.  Too much weight aft is a killer in the light air as well.  Don't forget to reset the top batten using the vang when you turn downwind.  I have seen more inefficient main trim with boats that struggle in the light to medium breeze due to main not working efficiently.

 

 

 

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looks like some sort of luff tensioner?

 

as for light air, weight position is a little screwed up by the skipper/traveler rule. leeward heel and crew up at the shrouds, even putting some in front.  

mast should sag to leeward upwind so 2-3 steps down from base tune is good.  also, I find putting the boom above centerline in the light helps power the main up.

downwind, hold the boom so the kite gybes first.  once filled, gybe the boom over.  this helps come out of the gybe with speed. this is tough crew-wise in light air as you really don't want weight aft  

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On 10/26/2018 at 9:38 AM, Wet Spreaders said:

In the photo, what are the white lines and patches close to the luff of the kite at the tack and the head?

The zippers that replaced yarn when packing the kite

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On 10/26/2018 at 3:34 PM, bloodshot said:

looks like some sort of luff tensioner?

 

as for light air, weight position is a little screwed up by the skipper/traveler rule. leeward heel and crew up at the shrouds, even putting some in front.  

mast should sag to leeward upwind so 2-3 steps down from base tune is good.  also, I find putting the boom above centerline in the light helps power the main up.

downwind, hold the boom so the kite gybes first.  once filled, gybe the boom over.  this helps come out of the gybe with speed. this is tough crew-wise in light air as you really don't want weight aft  

If he's running a masthead kite, skipper/traveler rule is the least of his concerns about staying class-compliant.

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fucket European OD is with masthead kites around 90-95 sqm from memory, the boats have different rigs than the US built boats. I think there is no longer any 105 class racing in UK or France. We had a reasonable amount from 2004-2010

wanderlust with number 3 you need to sail the boat pretty free and certainly not point until you are moving. In my experience of owning one for 5 years the 105 is a world of pain in less than 6 knots in mixed irc fleets. Those are simply not the conditions for the boat. A J80 or 92 will overtake you on the water. If you have a overlapping jib then you can try and race with that but UK owners under IRC found they never won in any conditions whereas with just the number 3 you can win in medium and heavier air. Boat suits passage racing better than W/L in mixed fleets with symmetrical boats under IRC

 

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