Bob Perry

Carbon cutter No. 2

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The Betts built Carbon Cutter No. 2 was launched last week. This one is a bit lghter than No. 1 as we went with an all lithium battery system. All the focsle gear was i the boat at time of launch.

I could not attend  the launch as I had cataract surgery that day and that was a hoot. But my friend Somebody Else was there to get some pics. All went well. The Autoprop did not impress anyone. No. 1 has a Gori prop. Forst sail will be next week.

Two more to go. No 3 is about 60% done.

44656569365_1cfe7a9359_b.jpgGC 7 by robert perry, on Flickr

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Hoppe youre feelleng bettere aftere surgurey.  No2 lookes greate to.                         :)

    

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Snags:

Yes, I'm fine and now have 20/20 distance vision. I no longer need glasses for driving or walking on the beach. I will need some prescription "readers" for up close stuff but I have to wait fir a month until my eyes fully heal for those. It is truly amazing technology and a fascinating experience.I did some research int the history of cataract surgery before the procedure.

30629857837_efa770e358_b.jpgGC 1 by robert perry, on Flickr

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All very cool Bob - New boat launched & new eyes on the same day. :D

I'm a bit surprised you didn't choose the "reader" lenses over distance lenses considering your work.

What was your thinking there? (I recently got advised that I have the first hints of cataracts).

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Jon:

Discussed it with both my ophthalmologist and my optomatrist and told them I was happy wearing glasses and they recommended I go for the far site lenses. I would not presume to tell you what to do. It's a personal thing.

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4 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

The Betts built Carbon Cutter No. 2 was launched last week. This one is a bit lghter than No. 1 as we went with an all lithium battery system. All the focsle gear was i the boat at time of launch.

I could not attend  the launch as I had cataract surgery that day and that was a hoot. But my friend Somebody Else was there to get some pics. All went well. The Autoprop did not impress anyone. No. 1 has a Gori prop. Forst sail will be next week.

Two more to go. No 3 is about 60% done.

44656569365_1cfe7a9359_b.jpgGC 7 by robert perry, on Flickr

Hope you’re putting corrector weights in the match racing and fleet events when all 4 are launched. 

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2 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

No. 1 shortly after launch.

36673224664_38d7977a5b_k.jpg107 by robert perry, on Flickr

Not wanting to be picky over something that’s almost certainly been mentioned before, but the fwd foot of the headsail doesn’t look that comfortable up there. 

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floating above it's lines, junk it ! J/K congrats , looks great as usual !

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6 hours ago, mad said:

Not wanting to be picky over something that’s almost certainly been mentioned before, but the fwd foot of the headsail doesn’t look that comfortable up there. 

Easy does it,,,,,, next you'll be complaining about sailing with the Lazy Jacks tensioned.

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Lazy jacks are not tensioned. I think we all know better than that. I prefer they are not flopping around. Tight enough not to flop, loose enough not to cut into the mainsail. Not difficult at all.

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8 hours ago, mad said:

Not wanting to be picky over something that’s almost certainly been mentioned before, but the fwd foot of the headsail doesn’t look that comfortable up there. 

Yer, its been pointed  out before.

I guess the owner loves watching the headsail chafing away.

Then again ,from the choice of boat design, sailing isn't the aim here, its all about capturing a particular "look".

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4 hours ago, overlay said:

Yer, its been pointed  out before.

I guess the owner loves watching the headsail chafing away.

Then again ,from the choice of boat design, sailing isn't the aim here, its all about capturing a particular "look".

ouch.

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Bob, 

Were any changes made to the sail inventory for #2 from experiences sailing #1?

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5 hours ago, overlay said:

Yer, its been pointed  out before.

I guess the owner loves watching the headsail chafing away.

Then again ,from the choice of boat design, sailing isn't the aim here, its all about capturing a particular "look".

 

overlay is an idiot and has clearly never been on a boat before.

Or, overlay, show us a boat somewhere, anywhere, when on a cracked sail tight reach, the forward foot of the headsail does not chafe someplace on either the pulpit or the lifelines.

 

Bob, the boat looks great.

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Thanks Beer.

Don't think I have ever sailed on a boat with a bow pulpit when the headsail does not drape over it at some point when you crack off. Sure, some cruisers like to raise the tack up above the pulpit but I like to keep the tack as low as possible. Overlay needs to go sailing. The boat sails extremely well. Granted it's no TP52 but as a traditionally styled cruising boat it has shown very good boat speed. And yes, this is a custom design and the owner requested a traditional "look". That's what he likes. That's what he got.

 

Cal20:

The sail inventory is identical to No. 1 as far as I know. I'll ask when we go out with Jack next week.

 

Darth:

The boat in the background is WALL STREET DUCK. I believe it's a Wiley design from SF. I'm sure someone here knows. It's in pretty rugged condition and has been sitting like that for at least a year. Looks to be a nice boat. Hope someone brings it back to life.

36851002503_81e446ee5d_k.jpgDSC_6680 by robert perry, on Flickr

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Well done Bob. Very well done.

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32 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

The boat in the background is WALL STREET DUCK. I believe it's a Wiley design from SF.

Carl Schumacher 38: 

 

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I have lazy jacks on my Tartan 3800.  I deploy them when I drop the main (many times single handing), then prior to

flaking the main I pull the jacks to a cleat at the bow end of the boom and secure till the next drop.  The layzies are never deployed when sailing...just my ten cents worth.  Happy winter sailing everyone.

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Foamy: I have done the same thing on many boats. But in this case we were out for a quick initial sail on the boat and there was a lot going on. For longer trips the lazy jacks would be stowed at the gooseneck. I have way that they can "autostow".

 

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This boat looks great ! and efficient at sails, well done !

We are not used of such designs here on this side of the atlantic coast.

Thanks Bob for sharing the view !

Julien

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Cool, another beauty launched. It is kinda surreal to see the same amazing bespoke yacht launched again! But you're used to it. Most Tayanas looked bespoke to me when new.

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JM:

The carbon cutters are my variation on the Brsitol Channel Cutter theme.

 

Thanks Lasal. Just another day at the office.

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  How much weight did the batt change give? Same amp/hr capacity for the Lithium bank?  Why was a different prop tried, & will #2 be changed back?  The boat looks better with the bow knuckle sitting just clear of the waterline.

Thank you

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I like the dark sheer and the sailplan looks appropriate.

Of course the headsail is going to touch the bow pulpit for the armchair admirals out there. The rail is there for safety; not aesthetics or aerodynamics across the sail and impedes the sail as a result. We all concur that it is a necessary evil. Just ask an insurance agent.

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hey Bob- have you guy's got any sort of polars on these bad boys ? 

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So, I'm curious about the full keel with the cut-away forefoot. I thought we were done with full keels a long time ago? What was the keel design optimized for?

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43 minutes ago, mookiesurfs said:

So, I'm curious about the full keel with the cut-away forefoot. I thought we were done with full keels a long time ago? What was the keel design optimized for?

It's what the client wanted. The full thread spanning years is in CA, if you're interested.

 

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19 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Thanks Beer.

Don't think I have ever sailed on a boat with a bow pulpit when the headsail does not drape over it at some point when you crack off. Sure, some cruisers like to raise the tack up above the pulpit but I like to keep the tack as low as possible. Overlay needs to go sailing. The boat sails extremely well. Granted it's no TP52 but as a traditionally styled cruising boat it has shown very good boat speed. And yes, this is a custom design and the owner requested a traditional "look". That's what he likes. That's what he got.

 

Cal20:

The sail inventory is identical to No. 1 as far as I know. I'll ask when we go out with Jack next week.

 

Darth:

The boat in the background is WALL STREET DUCK. I believe it's a Wiley design from SF. I'm sure someone here knows. It's in pretty rugged condition and has been sitting like that for at least a year. Looks to be a nice boat. Hope someone brings it back to life.

36851002503_81e446ee5d_k.jpgDSC_6680 by robert perry, on Flickr

As always thanks for the info and sorry for the slight highjack, also the cutters look amazing  

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Brunton Autoprops are clever things, but crap on a sailing boat where you want to minimize drag at low speed. The blades just hang open till you are going fast enough to feather them! Wop prop of other well engineered feathering props are much better.

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Longy:

I think we save d about 1,000 lbs with the battery change. We made an adjustment to the ballast slugs also so we are about 1,500 lbs. lighter than No. 1. No. 1 was launched with an empty focsle. No. 2 had the focsle loaded at launch.

 

Client was in charge of prop selection. I've been adamant that a Max Prop was the way to go but my advice falls on deaf ears. Not sure what will happen to the Autoprop. Can't imagine it will stay on the boat. I'l let you know.

 

Bigrpowr:

Yes, we have polars and full VPP tables. I haven't done a new design for over 20 years without VPP's. It's just part of the process now.

 

Mooks:

You would think that by now"full keels" would have gone the way of bias ply tires. But no. There are still a die hard bunch of cruising sailors who believe the safest sailboat is one with a full keel. Considering the "my keel fell off and I can't get up!" stories we read these days I can understand.They see a full keel with internal ballast as the safest way to go. In this case it was part of the design brief from the first few minutes wit the client. "I want a full keel, like my last boat." What I tried to do was give the client the most effective "full keel" I could that would meet his criteria. I failed on my first attempt. The client wanted the leading edge further forward. I moved it. It's my job to give the client what he wants while making sure it works well. The treatment aft with the outboard rudder and "chastity strut" was part of the effort to reduce the chord of the "full keel" and allow for a big rudder with some balance area. I wanted a gentle feel on the tiller. 

 

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I have never liked full keels.  But, I had a long time PNW sailor explain to me the merits of full keels while I was up there cruising with him for a month.  He explained that the full keel protects the rudder and prop from the driftwood one often encounters.  And, no doubt, I did observe copious driftwood while I was up there.  So, I have adjusted my attitude towards full keels for some parts of the world.

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There is lots of wood in the water in the spring but it's not common to hear about sailboats getting disabled by them, full keel or not. Most wood floats at the surface, so the prop and rudder tend to be protected by the hull rather than the keel. I know of more than one planing powerboat that's had its outdrive damaged.

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Nice boat, the question always pops up in my mind, but why? These things must be getting on towards a million a pop so clearly the owner has stacks of cash to fulfil his sailing whims. Good for the industry though but still kinda weird, actually probably a better word would be eccentric. I would love to go for a sail on one to have a feel of how modern materials and tech work with a semi traditional design. Been on a 30ft teak n' bronze Lyle Hess cutter that weighed 8 tons and that baby owned inertia! 

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2 hours ago, toad said:

the question always pops up in my mind, but why?

Here's your homework assignment:

Research the very wealthy's attitudes toward political stability, economic stability, climate stability. They've seen the numbers. They've paid the researchers for the executive summaries. They may put up a public appearance of "everything's fine" while silently prepping for it all to come crashing down. Why the secrecy? They don't want to alert people to the urgency of their prepping. Here's a good Google search string: .super-wealthy preppers'.

 

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

There is lots of wood in the water in the spring but it's not common to hear about sailboats getting disabled by them, full keel or not. Most wood floats at the surface, so the prop and rudder tend to be protected by the hull rather than the keel. I know of more than one planing powerboat that's had its outdrive damaged.

The wood is what keeps the prop shops busy here. I couldn't count the number of mangled props and shafts I have seen hauled out in my local boatyard all due to driftwood.

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5 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

Here's your homework assignment:

Research the very wealthy's attitudes toward political stability, economic stability, climate stability. They've seen the numbers. They've paid the researchers for the executive summaries. They may put up a public appearance of "everything's fine" while silently prepping for it all to come crashing down. Why the secrecy? They don't want to alert people to the urgency of their prepping. Here's a good Google search string: .super-wealthy preppers'.

 

Members of the wealthy capitalist classes are buying up remote and beautiful parts of NZ, cunts the lot of them.

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14 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The wood is what keeps the prop shops busy here. I couldn't count the number of mangled props and shafts I have seen hauled out in my local boatyard all due to driftwood.

You folks are at ground zero compared to a bit farther south where I am so I guess it's not surprising to have my experience overturned. I wonder what, if any, patterns the shops see as far as power vs. sail and full keel vs. fin. 

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Thanks Bob, exactly what I wanted to know. There had to be a reason, and that is it. I own your design book and have read it several times, and I thank you for it. When it comes to a keel like this, does it actually generate hydrodynamic lift from a foil cross section, or is it primarily barn door effect?

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3 hours ago, toad said:

Members of the wealthy capitalist classes are buying up remote and beautiful parts of NZ, cunts the lot of them.

Tasmania

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6 hours ago, unShirley said:

I have never liked full keels.  But, I had a long time PNW sailor explain to me the merits of full keels while I was up there cruising with him for a month.  He explained that the full keel protects the rudder and prop from the driftwood one often encounters.  And, no doubt, I did observe copious driftwood while I was up there.  So, I have adjusted my attitude towards full keels for some parts of the world.

40 years of a LOT of sailing up here in the PNW, 95% of it on fin keel boats.  You do encounter a lot of floating wood.  But.....Never had a rudder or prop damaged by driftwood or deadheads.  Bow dings, yes.  Repair to leading edge of keel, yes.  Scuffed bootstripe, yes.  But the logs and other floating crap bounce or roll away to the side.  

The real benefit of full-keeled boats around here is that they are so slow in light air and go upwind so poorly that the owner's always have justification to fire up the engine and get to the next bar on shore in time for happy hour.  That is if they can manage to get their boat into the dock in a tight marina.

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Shirley:

The choice of full keel has nothing to do with where you live. It's just a personal decision. I have done many many offshore cruising oats that do not have full keels . My own preference would be for a fin and a spade rudder. But I am not the client. Some sailors just feel a full keel, in it's various forms, is safer.In their mind. it's never gong to fall off. Of course the well designed fin keel won' fall off either. But try telling them.

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Mooks:

Yes. I designed that keel as a long fin with an NACA foil. It took several dog walks for me to decide just how thin I would make it. I probably could have gone with a 7% thickness ratio. I've never gone that thin on a long keel before nut I think it would work.  But in this case I needed volume in the fin for the ballast and ALL the tankage. So after a few dog walks and many pipes I chose a 9% thickness ratio. I used quite a bit of sweep to the leading edge to help the keel. Log chords don't play well with vertical leading edges. You have to coax the water to stay attached to your foil and not just take the easiest way out and shoot under the tip with a big vortex, i.e. drag. I chose gentle.

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Left:

Sorry but you need to get some experience with a well designed modern full keel boat. You generalize way too much and display your ignorance. There are many of my full keel boats competing and winning. You might check out AIRLOOM. Then there is Jeff who sailed his Baba 40 single handed, non stop around the world. But I won't even go into that.

 

Those duck decals on the stern are not for losing.

35635574292_45e859906c_k.jpgAirloom heeled stern by robert perry, on Flickr

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9 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Longy:

I think we save d about 1,000 lbs with the battery change. We made an adjustment to the ballast slugs also so we are about 1,500 lbs. lighter than No. 1. No. 1 was launched with an empty focsle. No. 2 had the focsle loaded at launch.

 

Client was in charge of prop selection. I've been adamant that a Max Prop was the way to go but my advice falls on deaf ears. Not sure what will happen to the Autoprop. Can't imagine it will stay on the boat. I'l let you know.

Bigrpowr:

Yes, we have polars and full VPP tables. I haven't done a new design for over 20 years without VPP's. It's just part of the process now.

Mooks:

You would think that by now"full keels" would have gone the way of bias ply tires. But no. There are still a die hard bunch of cruising sailors who believe the safest sailboat is one with a full keel. Considering the "my keel fell off and I can't get up!" stories we read these days I can understand.They see a full keel with internal ballast as the safest way to go. In this case it was part of the design brief from the first few minutes wit the client. "I want a full keel, like my last boat." What I tried to do was give the client the most effective "full keel" I could that would meet his criteria. I failed on my first attempt. The client wanted the leading edge further forward. I moved it. It's my job to give the client what he wants while making sure it works well. The treatment aft with the outboard rudder and "chastity strut" was part of the effort to reduce the chord of the "full keel" and allow for a big rudder with some balance area. I wanted a gentle feel on the tiller. 

 

Never had a problem with a MaxProp, except once when the person reinstalled it at the wrong setting and the boat would barely move off the dock.  That was solved quickly.  The are fabulous props in reverse - they can blow a hole in the water if you need to stop hard - and very low drag.  

 

 

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Just now, Bob Perry said:

Left:

Sorry but you need to get some experience with a well designed modern full keel boat. You generalize way too much and display your ignorance. There are many of my full keel boats competing and winning. You might check out AIRLOOM. Then there is Jeff who sailed his Baba 40 single handed, non stop around the world. But I won't even go into that.

 

Those duck decals on the stern are not for losing.

35635574292_45e859906c_k.jpgAirloom heeled stern by robert perry, on Flickr

Oh, I understand about your ability to make a long keel boat sail well.  Not doubting that at all.  And I've lost a race or two to Airloom over the years.  But the discussion was about needing a full keel in the PNW, and presenting some evidence that fin keels do just fine.  After that, I was just having some fun primarily aimed at the Westsail crowd.

That looks like it was taken on the sound a few years ago, with one of my current crew hiking reasonably hard.  I remember when Airloom sailed a great Fouleweather Bluff race for an overall, IIRC.

(But....Not sure I'd take duck dodge ducks as giving too much street cred, but the tonnage of Airloom would certainly get respect on Lake Union.)

 

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

40 years of a LOT of sailing up here in the PNW, 95% of it on fin keel boats.  You do encounter a lot of floating wood.  But.....Never had a rudder or prop damaged by driftwood or deadheads.  Bow dings, yes.  Repair to leading edge of keel, yes.  Scuffed bootstripe, yes.  But the logs and other floating crap bounce or roll away to the side.  

The real benefit of full-keeled boats around here is that they are so slow in light air and go upwind so poorly that the owner's always have justification to fire up the engine and get to the next bar on shore in time for happy hour.  That is if they can manage to get their boat into the dock in a tight marina.

I lost one rudder entirely due to lumber in the water. It would have made a nice telephone pole, we T-boned it, went over it and it came up just in time to rip the rudder off the transom. That was a very interesting noise as it rolled down and under the keel, then went quiet...BAM.

Apart from that, I had a couple of major dings on the prop over the years, found some really odd scrapes in the bottom paint, the usual stuff.

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Another 1000+ Pounds, that is very, very nice.   Sailing Pics look outstanding, especially upwind.   Boat with bumpers is meh.... 

BTW while I like this boat the alternative interior helm with the enlarged cabin is absolutely sweeet !!!   Sorry I have used Melges carbon money not new Betts.   But for someone who wants to play with better stability and speed  carbon is looking very good.    Amazon, Google other high tech boys and girls this is your toy!!!

 

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Bob has his own slightly modified NACA foil section that we came up with a while back on a previous project. It started with a tried and true NACA foil that had just the characteristics that he likes but there was a very slight hollow to the exit that would give builders headaches. Hard enough to get down in that deep crotch and laminate the trailing edge and we took out that slight hollow since it is well aft of the point where there might be any laminar flow characteristics and there should be no real world performance loss and would greatly facilitate the production of the keel. I have to dig down into my files but I think I named it NACAxxxx.RHP or something like that. 

     Funny thing is that when you import one of the publically available NACA files into a 3d CAD program like Rhino3D, you will see that the mathematical formulas that they used back in the day (50's?) to describe those foil profiles actually are not really that fair when looked at closely with the more recent analysis tools available in most modern CAD programs. Doesn't take much minor tweaking to achieve a much fairer  surface and that is used in the development of the Rhino model. Splitting hairs really but no point in not using any tools available to get the best results. 

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

I lost one rudder entirely due to lumber in the water. It would have made a nice telephone pole, we T-boned it, went over it and it came up just in time to rip the rudder off the transom. That was a very interesting noise as it rolled down and under the keel, then went quiet...BAM.

Apart from that, I had a couple of major dings on the prop over the years, found some really odd scrapes in the bottom paint, the usual stuff.

Have a friend with a very large cruising cat with fixed keels.  The keel pushed a log down just enough that it popped up right into the sail drive and pushed the sail drive and engine right up.  Lot's of water ingress, barely saved the boat.  Nope, thet thar 'lumber' in the water can be a might bothersome from time to time in these parts...

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I must've been lucky so far. Knock wood (doh!) it'll stay that way...

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Left:

The light and very shifty air you get on the Duck Dodge should give AIRLOOM all the street cred it needs. Here's anther Baba 40 that has been racing and winning on the East Coast this year.

31743072878_5eb60be2d0_b.jpgBaba 40 racer by robert perry, on Flickr

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Love catching up on the CC's.  Bob, you do a great job of dealing with the comments here, as always.  Boat looks terrific under sail. I would say finger tip steering, those keels do make the boat track really well.    I like the maxprop also and would suggest it and let it go as well.  Making the customer happy is also an art form. 

 

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On 10/28/2018 at 7:55 PM, Left Shift said:

The real benefit of full-keeled boats around here is that they are so slow in light air and go upwind so poorly that the owner's always have justification to fire up the engine and get to the next bar on shore in time for happy hour.  That is if they can manage to get their boat into the dock in a tight marina.

 

LOL!!!  There is a place for full keel boats.  One can walk away from the helm and it will track straight and true.  Spin keel Fade rudder boat will usually only do that in the most finicky of instances, like flat water, and steady, low to moderate breeze, and specific trim settings.

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On 10/31/2018 at 6:19 AM, billy backstay said:

 

LOL!!!  There is a place for full keel boats.  One can walk away from the helm and it will track straight and true.  Spin keel Fade rudder boat will usually only do that in the most finicky of instances, like flat water, and steady, low to moderate breeze, and specific trim settings.

I well designed fin and spade will do that in a lot of conditions, not just a few. One time when a long keel does reliably track straight and true is under power in reverse - and that is not considered a good thing. 

On 10/28/2018 at 10:35 AM, toad said:

Nice boat, the question always pops up in my mind, but why? These things must be getting on towards a million a pop so clearly the owner has stacks of cash to fulfil his sailing whims. 

You'd need a very hefty discount to get one of these under $1M. It isn't do do with the style of boat. On these particular boats, the attention to detail is remarkable - even in high end custom boats - and I say that as someone who understands attention to detail. 

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Never found long keel boats to go straight in reverse more than fins

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Full keel boats are almost always miserable in reverse. It's hard to eliminate the prop walk when you funnel that directional flow through the aperture. The only solution I have found is to use a Max Prop. The blades of the MP are symmetrical and as efficient in reverse as they are in forwards. The Max Prop can reduce the problem but will not eliminate the problem.

On the carbon cutters I was hoping with that unusually large aperture that the bat would be docile in reverse. All I know so far is No. 1 with the Gori is pretty good in reverse and No. 2 with the Autoprop is awful. I'd really like to try No. 3 with a Max Prop.

The very best boats for control in reverse are race boats, with short chord keels and clean spade rudders. The more shit you hang under the boat aft there more the chance that the boat will not behave in reverse. Some of my cruising boats with skeg hung rudders are very good in reverse. But no skeg is better.

Bottom line is that lack of control in reverse is potentially the biggest problem you will have with a full keel boat. Think bowthruster!

 

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On 11/3/2018 at 12:05 AM, Bob Perry said:

Full keel boats are almost always miserable in reverse. It's hard to eliminate the prop walk when you funnel that directional flow through the aperture. The only solution I have found is to use a Max Prop. The blades of the MP are symmetrical and as efficient in reverse as they are in forwards. The Max Prop can reduce the problem but will not eliminate the problem.

On the carbon cutters I was hoping with that unusually large aperture that the bat would be docile in reverse. All I know so far is No. 1 with the Gori is pretty good in reverse and No. 2 with the Autoprop is awful. I'd really like to try No. 3 with a Max Prop.

The very best boats for control in reverse are race boats, with short chord keels and clean spade rudders. The more shit you hang under the boat aft there more the chance that the boat will not behave in reverse. Some of my cruising boats with skeg hung rudders are very good in reverse. But no skeg is better.

Bottom line is that lack of control in reverse is potentially the biggest problem you will have with a full keel boat. Think bowthruster!

 

Our Gori can get us going pretty quickly backwards, but if I leave it in gear we'll be making a two knot circle in reverse to starboard from prop walk.

Of course, on a starboard tie-up that much prop walk is almost like having a stern thruster.

 

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40 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Hull No. 2 out for it's second sail. 12 knots of wind and 8 knots of boat speed.

Looks great Bob. I noticed you've got the hydro generators down.  Any info on boat speed with or without them running? Have you guys found a sweet spot/wind range over where they go in the water and/or come back out?  I'm speaking of both boat speed and amp/hr generation. 

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Fufkin:

In short, no. The first time we used them on No 1 we could see no change in boat  speed and we were getting 20 amps at 9 knots with both deployed. Most of the effort right now is on getting all the sailing systems working flawlessly. There were some issues with the storm trysail track and the third reef that had to be worked out. Minor annoyances but annoyances.

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Bob

It would never occur to me to ask for this kind of boat, but now that I've seen it.....Wow!

You did an amazing job of making all the right compromises (to my untrained eye). Really lovely.

David

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On 11/4/2018 at 6:30 PM, B.J. Porter said:

Our Gori can get us going pretty quickly backwards, but if I leave it in gear we'll be making a two knot circle in reverse to starboard from prop walk.

Of course, on a starboard tie-up that much prop walk is almost like having a stern thruster.

 

Always had great success with Maxprops.  Once you get the pitch properly set for the boat (Not a big deal, but you need to remember to write it down!) they are efficient and definitely stop a boat when reversed.  

 

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Thanks David. No question it's an unusual boat quasi traditional except for the carbon build. But I'm quite happy with it and it does sail really well.  With 13,500 lbs. of internal lead ballast tucked into the bottom of that big keel the boat is as stiff as a church.

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We happened to tie up on the same dock as #2 (or was it #1?) at Cap Sante after Round the County, so I got to see her up close the following morning on my way to coffee and again on my way back.  Simply beautiful!  I must've looked like I'd never seen a boat before, or that I was watching an alien-landing to a passerby, but I just stood there in admiration of it all.  Well done!

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Thanks Silver. I'm a bit too  emotionally involved with the project to have the fun of your reaction. I do marvel at the level of detail that is the ;product of a great team effort.

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3 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Thanks David. No question it's an unusual boat quasi traditional except for the carbon build. But I'm quite happy with it and it does sail really well.  With 13,500 lbs. of internal lead ballast tucked into the bottom of that big keel the boat is as stiff as a church.

Other than the Campanile of the Pisa Cathedrale, perhaps.  But even that is tending more to the vertical these days.  It's a trend.

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