Zonker

Welcome to Australia - we'll have your boat now

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When we were cruising we arrived in Italy and I went to see the local Guardia di Finanza to get our Passports stamped. Through a cloud of cigarette smoke I was told 'Next port'. This became the mantra for the next three months with no one prepared to give us a stamp. We left the boat for a few weeks in Sardinia while we went home for my Brother in laws wedding. At Rome airport the guy at immigration asked for our passports and then just glanced at them without stamping them. When we arrived home we got a very hard time because we had no proof that we had ever entered, nor left Italy. 

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3 minutes ago, savoir said:

 

I have been escorted into the back room at LAX several times. Such fun, especially the fat lesbian with the blue rubber gloves.

Houston is worse.

Here is a tip. As soon as the finger goes in your arse, just moan and say 'that is great, put two in.' They soon leave you alone. Another tip. Don't try this in Fiji. 

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Other experiences may differ..............

I've flown across the Pacific literally hundreds of times over the past 30 years or so, mostly into LAX. Only recall 2 particularly tedious experiences; maybe because I look like a typical bored business traveller (or they can see that I've been there before). Queues can be long, but no worse than, say LHR - let's start a thread on that place!

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None of you guys are exaggerating about the hassles of entering the US-legally. I used to be overseas sales manager for a small electronics firm, traveling frequently and I was always so embarrassed at the lousy welcome international visitors received. And that was pre-9/11. I don't get why our officials don't recognize that passengers entering via our customs and immigration system are submitting to the authority and control of US law. The ones we have problems with are running drugs, people, counterfeit goods and other contraband and doing and end run around the system. 

FKT et al: If you ever do screw up the desire to travel again to our less than hospitable shores,  be sure to come down to SD and I'll buy you a beer or two. We have some pretty good stuff here. 

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28 minutes ago, savoir said:

 

I have been escorted into the back room at LAX several times. Such fun, especially the fat lesbian with the blue rubber gloves.

Houston is worse.

Definitely off list now! 

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20 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

Other experiences may differ..............

I've flown across the Pacific literally hundreds of times over the past 30 years or so, mostly into LAX. Only recall 2 particularly tedious experiences; maybe because I look like a typical bored business traveller (or they can see that I've been there before). Queues can be long, but no worse than, say LHR - let's start a thread on that place!

Standing in Auckland after a 36 hour flight and finding 3 other planes from China, Japan and the islands etc have landed 30 minutes before you is hell on earth. That was a truly shit airport at the time, flying out late and nothing was open to eat or drink either. 

Fuck I hate flying    :P

Dont get me started about fucking baggage reclaim!!

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1 hour ago, savoir said:

 

I have been escorted into the back room at LAX several times. Such fun, especially the fat lesbian with the blue rubber gloves.

Houston is worse.

Dude, you REALLY have to stop flirting with these people. They have zero sense of humor...

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The bizarre inefficiency of some American bureaucracy is surprising. I’m 60 years old, have made maybe 100 visits to the States for busines and am respectable to the point of dullness. When I was 17 I got busted for a couple of joints worth of dope - £20 fine - and since then every time I get taken off for a secondary inspection which involves sitting in a windowless room for between 20 and 100 minutes waiting for someone to stamp my passport. I take it as a gift to test my patience, but also see some extraordinary stories, like the glee the agents took when discovering that a borrowed identity was for someone with a murder charge outstanding (“Boy, you have no idea how much trouble you are in” he whooped), or like the wily old agent who was able to demonstrate that the pleasant young holidaymaker had been informally working in the States for years (in a few minutes I went from “unhand that woman” outrage to “oh yes, he’s right”). 

Maybe they’re just making quota on stopping bald white men to even up the colour balance, since I am usually the only Caucasian in the room. 

The whole process is numbingly procedural and their state has wasted many thousands of dollars on me over the years.

 

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5 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Dude, you REALLY have to stop flirting with these people. They have zero sense of humor...

Flirting ?  Oh well, at least I agree with the zero sense of humor bit. The US customs people are seriously nasty and have been that way for years. Just last July I waited in line at Houston for 80 minutes and was then escorted to the back room by two guys with guns and no necks. There they slashed my entry from six months entry down to two. My visa was a mere four months old. That little episode only cost me $6,000.

Nice.

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7 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

BJ interestingly the US can also be a big pain in the arse for US flagged vessels without their owners knowing it.

For instance for Florida registered vessels US Customs Border Protection don't automatically recognise US flagged vessels as being American. They attach the nationality of the owner instead. The USCG will recognise the same vessel as a US flagged vessel. That means a Florida Registered, US documented/flagged vessel owned by a foreigner has to physically clear both in and out in the US when crossing jurisdictions.

I suspect this is a Miami drug trafficking related thing.

Not quite sure of the particular Florida situation referred to, but a USCG documented vessel can not be majority owned by a non-citizen, or at least couldn't be in the late 90's. I doubt the US has eased up on that. I suspect the vessel you are referring to above is not documented, just state registered and flying a US flag. And yes it is not quite as straightforward entering and leaving if you are a foreigner (or permanent resident) with a state registered boat.

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31 minutes ago, savoir said:

    ...Just last July I waited in line at Houston for 80 minutes and was then escorted to the back room by two guys with guns and no necks. There they slashed my entry from six months entry down to two. My visa was a mere four months old. That little episode only cost me $6,000.

Mate lose the T Shirt next time. BTW did that Visa still let you do murders in that two months??

hitman-price-list-hit-man-funny-vulgar-offensive.jpg

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The lesson from this episode is that if you want to get away with something at least have a good story.

In this case the guy was relying on provisions in the Act that allow a vessel to enter with undocumented persons on board because of illness, stress of weather, or other circumstances beyond the control of the vessels master including entering with crew incorrectly documented etc. 

He concocted a tale about being caught in a severe storm a couple of hundred miles off the coast that forced him to enter Australia where he did. The Government tore that story to bits using a course reconstruction from his GPS and expert weather reconstruction indicating he lined up the Southport Seaway from French Polynesia over 3,000 mile away.

It was a bad weather story not quite as good as two Ukrainian men caught trying to smuggle six Ukrainians into the UK. The leader in his defence said he wanted to employ the six Ukrainians as crew for his 50th birthday party, so took them on board the party boat and went out into the middle of the English Channel to assess their seafaring abilities. He then claimed that a huge storm had moved in and the yacht had also developed engine problems. Becoming frightened, he said the Ukrainian crew turned on him and threatened to throw him overboard unless he brought them to the UK.

The 50th party boat was a 30' long twin-keeler.

30ft-yacht-called-The-Tazik-used-to-smuggle-six-Ukrainian-immigrants-into-the-UK-going-under-auction.jpg

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12 hours ago, mad said:

Try flying into Chile on a Brit passport and FO advisory about it not being a good idea, the UK was holding Pinochet at the time and he still had some popular support in places  

You learn to be very polite to the custom guys and that friendly para-military policeman with a machine gun. :P

I wonder how much longer before the US reaches that level? 

Better to fly into Chile with a British passport these days than an Australian one..... 

Australia is the only country left on the Chilean 'reciprocity' list ... even Albania and Mexico have been removed from it.

Separate rather long queue when the LA or QF flight arrives in Santiago.... $117 US dollars.... South Pacific Pesos not accepted... thank you very much.  And then... having paid it the 'strayans  have to get back on the end of the immigration queue for cits of more enlightened  countries.....

Why do they do it? Because Australia is the only country in the whole wide world that charges Chileans for a visa....

This is why I never use my 'strayan passport in South America.....

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First off let me say that Australia has the right to have whatever rules they want and people have the choice to go there or not. We really wanted to cruise the coast of China but their rules make it virtually impossible - you can only stay in marinas, no anchoring, and it costs about $2000 in fees to go from one marina to the next. Secondly, any officials we dealt with in Oz were professional and generally friendly. Having said that, it is the most expensive country we visited in our travels (we have entered about 40 countries and territories). Our visas and quarantine fee were more than $500. The biggest surprise we had in the country were how many rules they have. Everywhere you look there are signs saying what you cannot do and what the fines are if you do it anyway. Virtually every Aussie I have ever met is laid back and easy going but somehow they decided to have governments that are quite over the top in how they work. It was completely different from NZ where everything is quite laid back.

We have entered the US by boat, car, and plane perhaps 200 times and find it to be generally fine but can be a royal pain because often officials don't even know their own rules and the attitudes of some of them verges on quite nasty, but these are the exception rather than the rule and the exceptions happen too often. Not happy to see the comments about Houston airport since we have a connection Chile to Toronto coming up after a cruise to Antarctica. The Economist did an article last year about the worst airport in the world. Their choice was Miami. I would agree although La Guardia is close. Americans who do not travel internationally must think that this is how airports are globally, they aren't.

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46 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

...Having said that, it is the most expensive country we visited in our travels (we have entered about 40 countries and territories).Our visas and quarantine fee were more than $500. ...

Do you factor bribes in that calc for some of the cheaper ones and take off $ for ease factor of Aust being a one stop shop where they all come to you? After that my guess their top $ ranking eases.

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I used to really hate flying into Miami from Grenada and waiting  1 to 3 hours in a huge queue just to get to immigration. 

But there has been a truly massive improvement with multiple touch screen terminals to do the computerised data check then a quick stamp by a real live agent with a 2 minute queue. Total time 10-15  minutes. Very polite and competent staff marshalling people to unused terminals and helping the unsure.

Still get the extra special super sniffer customs inspection on my baggage though. Comes from having Jamaica as my place of birth, flying in from Grenada with all sorts of stamps on my passport including Trinidad Venezuela and Columbia Still everybody is polite helpful and it was pretty quick. 

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47 minutes ago, TQA said:

I used to really hate flying into Miami from Grenada and waiting  1 to 3 hours in a huge queue just to get to immigration. 

But there has been a truly massive improvement with multiple touch screen terminals to do the computerised data check then a quick stamp by a real live agent with a 2 minute queue. Total time 10-15  minutes. Very polite and competent staff marshalling people to unused terminals and helping the unsure.

Still get the extra special super sniffer customs inspection on my baggage though. Comes from having Jamaica as my place of birth, flying in from Grenada with all sorts of stamps on my passport including Trinidad Venezuela and Columbia Still everybody is polite helpful and it was pretty quick. 

We came through Miami last year (from Grenada coincidentally). We only had to wait about 10 minutes to get a machine but then had a 2 1/2 hour wait with machine receipt in hand before we were able to hand it in to an agent. All sorts of people were missing connections.

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Do you factor bribes in that calc for some of the cheaper ones and take off $ for ease factor of Aust being a one stop shop where they all come to you? After that my guess their top $ ranking eases.

Never had to give a bribe anywhere as it turned out. We entered Oz in Brisbane and had to a considerable distance to a marina in the river to check in (and pay the $305 for quarantine inspection). Apparently you used to be able to check in at Scarborough, where we were going to be keeping the boat for a time but I guess it was inconvenient with the huge number of boats entering the country so they moved the check-in to a place nearer the airport. That cost us the best part of a day coming and going, so not very convenient. Getting to visit various offices in a country is part of the 'local colour'. In most places it is one stop shopping. Indonesia is incredibly bureaucratic though. When we were checking out in Bali I had to go to some other office that was a km or so away from the one I had just finished at. The official there grabbed my arm and loaded me on the back of his scooter to take me to and from that office, all with a big smile. As I said local colour. I agree with someone else who said the French islands in the Caribbean have the best system. I think I have been to the same gift shop in Guadeloupe (Deshaies) to check in. You fill out the form on a computer and pay 5 euro (used to be 3) to the guy who runs the gift shop who actually signs your form. If you know when you are leaving you can do the checkout at the same time with no extra charge. In St Martin, at least before the storm you went to a government office and filled out the form on a computer with no charge. The Dutch side where we stopped last year was much more bureaucratic and cost around $100 including bridge and anchoring fees.

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1 hour ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

We entered Oz in Brisbane and had to a considerable distance to a marina in the river to check in (and pay the $305 for quarantine inspection). Apparently you used to be able to check in at Scarborough, where we were going to be keeping the boat for a time but I guess it was inconvenient with the huge number of boats entering the country so they moved the check-in to a place nearer the airport. 

Clearance was always in the Brisbane River until a move to Scarborough for small vessels for a while then back to the River for all vessels now after Rivergate opened. Australian Quarantine fee obviously accords with their biosecurity concerns but hard to justify that impost which is around $450 now and probably a deterant to many going there. Then again a lot of places charge cruisers on a weekly/monthly basis now so it is getting harder to take the dollar target off ones back now.

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We in Britain land are hoping that we won’t get caught up in a bureaucratic miasma with the Brexit business. It’ll probably get bodged up reasonably well somehow. 

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5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:
6 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

...Having said that, it is the most expensive country we visited in our travels (we have entered about 40 countries and territories).Our visas and quarantine fee were more than $500. ...

Do you factor bribes in that calc for some of the cheaper ones and take off $ for ease factor of Aust being a one stop shop where they all come to you? After that my guess their top $ ranking eases.

I've never paid any bribes so I can't tell you how that factors in.

The Galapagos was the most we spent getting in anywhere, but that was to be expected.

Australia was the second most expensive just to get in. But we did the year visas, which were $145 AUD/person + chest X-Ray + medical exam in Noumea before we left. So the first time cost us about $700 for three visas. Will, our fourth, was at college by then and could come in on the $20 e-Visa since he wasn't sticking around for more than 90 days.

The first renewal in Australia cost $345AUD/person + chest-Xray + medical exam. That ended up costing closer to $1,900 AUD for three people. We asked for a year, they gave us six months, expiring our visas before conditions would be appropriate to leave and requiring a second renewal the next March.

The second renewal would have cost $345/person visa fee + $700/person "second renewal fee" + any medical requirements. Given that Australia was afraid we'd caught TB...somewhere, somehow...during our first year in Oz, we had no assurance they wouldn't require another medical check. You can't find out if you need one until after you apply. We were surprised the first time, since anyone with sense would have known screening us for TB after we'd been screened before entry and spent a year in the country was...stupid.

So that would have been $3,135 AUD to stay from late March until we left for Europe and Will's graduation in June, exclusive of any required medical exams.

We sent my daughter back to the US to visit colleges instead, and Kathy and I spent a week in New Zealand for our anniversary instead, and we all came back on $20AUD e-Visas instead since we knew we were leaving within three months if we timed it right.

As it stands now, with our stupid schedule for the last few months, we came back in September, left in October, came back last week, are headed to the states for the holidays in December, then return in January before setting sail out of Oz in early February....so the $20 e-Visas have worked out nicely. So the last year has been cheap because we've spent half of it elsewhere.

 

I haven't the faintest idea what the US charges by comparison, and Australia IS much cheaper if you are applying outside the country (e.g. $145 vs. $345 for the same visa).

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3 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Given that Australia was afraid we'd caught TB...somewhere, somehow...during our first year in Oz, we had no assurance they wouldn't require another medical check. You can't find out if you need one until after you apply. We were surprised the first time, since anyone with sense would have known screening us for TB after we'd been screened before entry and spent a year in the country was...stupid.

Don't feel singled out. For 5 consecutive years, every year I had to have a full medical to qualify for working in Antarctic waters. Every year I had to have a TB test and chest X-ray as part of it.

Until the doctor spat the dummy and wrote on my form, in LARGE letters, that this in his opinion constituted medical abuse, I showed no signs of TB and he refused to authorise the test.

There that matter rested until I eventually quit some 7 years later.

I used to amuse myself when filling out the form by altering my siblings' and children's current ages plus the age at which my parents had died. That used to amuse the doctor and nobody else ever noticed.

WRT Aussies being laid back, yeah. WRT the country having a shit-ton of idiotic laws and Govt bodies, also yeah. The bit you foreigners are missing is, mostly we ignore them and slide on by. Hell, I built my house without permission or any permits whatsoever and told them about it afterwards. Paying the fine was worth it for the lack of hassle.

That DOESN'T mean foreigners can ignore our rules when it comes to border security and quarantine. Once you're in here, if you keep your profile low, are polite and don't piss off the natives, you can get away with a hell of a lot and mostly we'll cover for you and lie to our own authorities. No probs.

FKT

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5 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Don't feel singled out. For 5 consecutive years, every year I had to have a full medical to qualify for working in Antarctic waters. Every year I had to have a TB test and chest X-ray as part of it.

Until the doctor spat the dummy and wrote on my form, in LARGE letters, that this in his opinion constituted medical abuse, I showed no signs of TB and he refused to authorise the test.

There that matter rested until I eventually quit some 7 years later.

I used to amuse myself when filling out the form by altering my siblings' and children's current ages plus the age at which my parents had died. That used to amuse the doctor and nobody else ever noticed.

WRT Aussies being laid back, yeah. WRT the country having a shit-ton of idiotic laws and Govt bodies, also yeah. The bit you foreigners are missing is, mostly we ignore them and slide on by. Hell, I built my house without permission or any permits whatsoever and told them about it afterwards. Paying the fine was worth it for the lack of hassle.

That DOESN'T mean foreigners can ignore our rules when it comes to border security and quarantine. Once you're in here, if you keep your profile low, are polite and don't piss off the natives, you can get away with a hell of a lot and mostly we'll cover for you and lie to our own authorities. No probs.

FKT

With respect, that's not exactly a picture of a well-functioning nation . . . Laws that people don't or can't obey are a bad thing, I reckon

Where did Australia get its nanny-state identity from? Was it like that when you were a kid, or is it recent?

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1 minute ago, Mr. Ed said:

With respect, that's not exactly a picture of a well-functioning nation . . . Laws that people don't or can't obey are a bad thing, I reckon

Where did Australia get its nanny-state identity from? Was it like that when you were a kid, or is it recent?

We got it from the UK and quiet disobedience of the law is part of the culture.

Now what would be *really* bad is blind obedience to stupid laws. How do you reckon your country would score? Don't tell me you have no stupid laws, there are limits to what I'll believe.

FKT

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Well, in the UK we're probably less heavily regulated than Australia in many things - all aspects of yotting for instance, which has more or less no state control - and I reckon we have a higher level of obedience to the law, and are straighter in our tax dealings, than citizens of many European countries. Not as straight as the Scandis probably. Most of my interactions with the state here are pretty well-regulated and you reach a bottom of common-sense quite quickly - some low level halfwit form-checkers of course, but you get through them alright. About the only tax fiddle I get involved in is the bizarre one where you sign a form when buying red diesel (discounted) saying that 40% of it is going to heat your boat, and only 60% is going to drive it. That's daft.

My nephew, works in a gold mine in Australia, tells me the Health and Safety legislation was so daft that they would just sign a bunch of forms at the beginning of the day, to have something to fill the box up. Like your TB tests, pointless and ultimately destructive. Bad legislation and bad implementation, I posit. Same with your house. Do you think you'd have got the permissions if you'd applied for your house in the usual way? There was one odd farmer in England who built one without any permission and tried to hide it for seven years (he reckoned it would be vintaged through) behind bales of straw. Down it came when he unveiled it. We all felt sorry for him, but he was a stupid dick really.

Now, if you're against all state influence and control that's a different matter.

Australia seems to be the only country where you can buy these signs. Branches. In the woods? Who would have thought it?

D-10248-FALLING-BRANCHES.png

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4 minutes ago, savoir said:

Branches snap off eucalyptus trees all the time.

Nope....** limbs**  fall off eucalyptus trees esp river red gums and the like.... often when the weather is very still... do not camp under them... a falling limb will kill you very seriously dead....

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2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

With respect, that's not exactly a picture of a well-functioning nation . . . Laws that people don't or can't obey are a bad thing, I reckon

Would any sensible person judge the UK by what someone from the Shetlands says or does..the USA by what comes out of an Alaskan's mouth??? Then again maybe that's a dumb question to direct at someone taking regulatory advice from someone called  @Fah Kiew Tu .

Mate the angry fucker hangs out in a place the rest of the country just ignores. That useless joint is only talked about once a year between Xmas and New Year and even that's pretty shakey if someone was to come up with a better scallop pie recipe or finishing a race at a buoy in Bass Strait could be shown to have appeal.

Fuck Cook is only credited with discovering the Australian east coast because Abel Tasman couldn't even be bothered telling anybody he bumped into this useless bit of dirt down the bottom 130 years before hand. Overseas visitors have been discouraged going there ever since to avoid the very same bad impression you have just formed about the nation as a whole.

Steer clear of the joint ..don't worry if you accidentally get close it suddenly appears on all GPS's when in range, but only once and not for long to prevent a return or you telling anybody... just like Tasman.

images (71).jpeg

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2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Well, in the UK we're probably less heavily regulated than Australia in many things - all aspects of yotting for instance, which has more or less no state control - and I reckon we have a higher level of obedience to the law, and are straighter in our tax dealings, than citizens of many European countries. Not as straight as the Scandis probably. Most of my interactions with the state here are pretty well-regulated and you reach a bottom of common-sense quite quickly - some low level halfwit form-checkers of course, but you get through them alright. About the only tax fiddle I get involved in is the bizarre one where you sign a form when buying red diesel (discounted) saying that 40% of it is going to heat your boat, and only 60% is going to drive it. That's daft.

My nephew, works in a gold mine in Australia, tells me the Health and Safety legislation was so daft that they would just sign a bunch of forms at the beginning of the day, to have something to fill the box up. Like your TB tests, pointless and ultimately destructive. Bad legislation and bad implementation, I posit. Same with your house. Do you think you'd have got the permissions if you'd applied for your house in the usual way? There was one odd farmer in England who built one without any permission and tried to hide it for seven years (he reckoned it would be vintaged through) behind bales of straw. Down it came when he unveiled it. We all felt sorry for him, but he was a stupid dick really.

Now, if you're against all state influence and control that's a different matter.

Australia seems to be the only country where you can buy these signs. Branches. In the woods? Who would have thought it?

D-10248-FALLING-BRANCHES.png

Indeed. I bought a packet of peanuts recently that had a warning on the label- caution, this product may contain peanuts.

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58 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Would any sensible person judge the UK by what someone from the Shetlands says or does..the USA by what comes out of an Alaskan's mouth??? Then again maybe that's a dumb question to direct at someone taking regulatory advice from someone called  @Fah Kiew Tu .

Mate the angry fucker hangs out in a place the rest of the country just ignores. That useless joint is only talked about once a year between Xmas and New Year and even that's pretty shakey if someone was to come up with a better scallop pie recipe or finishing a race at a buoy in Bass Strait could be shown to have appeal.

Fuck Cook is only credited with discovering the Australian east coast because Abel Tasman couldn't even be bothered telling anybody he bumped into this useless bit of dirt down the bottom 130 years before hand. Overseas visitors have been discouraged going there ever since to avoid the very same bad impression you have just formed about the nation as a whole.

Steer clear of the joint ..don't worry if you accidentally get close it suddenly appears on all GPS's when in range, but only once and not for long to prevent a return or you telling anybody... just like Tasman.

images (71).jpeg

Stop giving this place a gloss it doesn't rate. It's actually far worse than that.

FKT

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2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Same with your house. Do you think you'd have got the permissions if you'd applied for your house in the usual way?

Sure. It complied with all the planning rules and most of the building code. What it didn't comply with was stupid and I simply paid a professional engineer to stamp my plans, which removed the construction from the local govt restrictions. I told them I'd built the place after I'd finished. They fined me. It was worth it.

What it *did* get me out of was having to do an owner-builder course, various other pointless activities and having a series of inspections by people who generally knew less than me about how to build things. Not to mention actually drawing up plans, submitting them for approval before I started and having to apply for change approval every time I changed my mind. I should mention that the previous house I'd built was a 3 storey structure with nearly all the structural members made of welded posts & beams, also engineer certified after I'd drawn it up. I learned a couple of really valuable lessons from that build, the most valuable being to never again build anything more than a single storey high. Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

I pick my fights with the bureaucracy carefully - which is why I'd *never* do anything as idiotic as the guy who's lost his boat. That wasn't just prodding a wasp's nest with a stick, it was giving one a head-butt.

Jack is right about Tasmania. It's a quiet, backward place that is generally completely ignored by the rest of Australia. The water is cold & deep, lots of big sharks, there are few decent anchorages, almost no marinas, either no wind or it's blowing over 30 knots. I like it that way. Usually got a vacant mooring at the disposal of visitors crazy enough to get here.

FKT

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4 hours ago, savoir said:

Branches snap off eucalyptus trees all the time.

Because of all the fucking drop bears up in 'em, yeah.

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4 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

 

My nephew, works in a gold mine in Australia, tells me the Health and Safety legislation was so daft that they would just sign a bunch of forms at the beginning of the day, to have something to fill the box up. Like your TB tests, pointless and ultimately destructive.

you're forgetting all the union blokes gainfully employed clipping those OHS tickets on inflated wages.

 

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4 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Australia seems to be the only country where you can buy these signs. Branches. In the woods? Who would have thought it?

D-10248-FALLING-BRANCHES.png

Its not just the animals that get you here...

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/pitt-town-schoolgirl-8-dies-as-huge-gum-tree-branch-falls-on-students-teacher-20140221-336cg.html

https://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/gum-tree-which-shed-branch-and-killed-child-was-unstable-coroner-told/news-story/fa6850a458b45b8f66907d77a305f6a4

 

but yes - Aus is a complete nanny state.  We don't even have a tradition of knocking over or burning speed cameras.

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3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Jack is right about Tasmania. It's a quiet, backward place that is generally completely ignored by the rest of Australia. The water is cold & deep, lots of big sharks, there are few decent anchorages, almost no marinas, either no wind or it's blowing over 30 knots. I like it that way. Usually got a vacant mooring at the disposal of visitors crazy enough to get here.

Fah I was being a bit tongue in cheek as I'm actualy a bit of fan of Tasmania. It conjures up for me a really diverse range of thoughts from the mainland myth of Tamanian's having two headed stupidity, supurb natural images to producing world leaders in their relative fields. Putting aside the well knowns like scollup pies, MONA or the geological marvel of Flinders, name one place that produces these four diverse oddballs

1. Pills & Anzac Trust - When traditional grazing and agriculture was going through a rough patch Tasmania became the first place in Australia allowed to grow poppies for medicinal purposes, where at one stage produced half the world's medicinal supply. They did so without the need for big fences and nasty guard dogs. Unfortunately they have a headache of their own now to deal with being both competition and overdoses of prescription opioids causing greater regulation occuring worldwide. Some may have to go back to rearing fat lambs, but at least they can keep fences "as is" but go back to people stealing their hardwork for dinner. Though in New Zealand the fate of those lambs is probably worse.  :-)

2. Ocean Shit & Design - A Tasmanian born guy called Brodie Neill grew up in Hobarts Sandy Bay, playing on pristine beaches north of Bruny Is. He went on to live in London becoming a celebrated futuristic furniture designer with twisting and turning fibreglass and chipboard pieces etc. Three years ago he returned home to find his boyhood playground covered in ocean driven plastic waste. He now creates art and furniture pieces such as substituting inlaid marble and metals with materials derived from waste microplastics and nurdles lost in transit. He has also become a advocate of recycling ocean plastic by addressing Euro parliaments and the UN.

3. Orange Rocks or People - The Bay of Fires about 20 mile long on the north east coast was named by the British navigator and explorer Captain Tobias Furneaux, in 1773, when he noticed numerous fires, which led him to believe that the country was densely populated. What he probably saw was huge granite blocks that are colored bright orange by lichens. These orange lichens are a team play being a combination of algae that provides food by photosynthesis, while the fungus provides a protected environment for the algae. Maybe the Captain was right and there were a lot of people there around the campfire admiring natures art, bit like a 60,000 year old gallery version of MONA

4. Lucky & Smart - A guy called Bob Clifford a local boat builder also had the rights to the ferry service across the Derwant Riv that linked both sides of the city of Hobart. One evening in 1975 a bulk ore carrier ran into it putting the lot into the drink. Clifford using the capital from that windfall in passenger traffic, 9 million people (or 2/3 of Aust population then) in 2 years, went on to be the king of ferries, Incat, bringing to the world the large, alloy, fast wave piercing ferry and naval craft. Others followed so kickstarting a modern shipbuilding industry in Australia, a country that only seems to make tollways and housing these days.

Then again maybe Clifford was not lucky but a cunning bugger, taking the bulbs out of bridge Lead Lights that night? **

** apologies to dozen who died

images (78).jpeg

Drop-in-the-Ocean.jpg

bay-of-fires-tasmania-42.jpg

images (73).jpeg

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4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Sure. It complied with all the planning rules and most of the building code. What it didn't comply with was stupid and I simply paid a professional engineer to stamp my plans, which removed the construction from the local govt restrictions. I told them I'd built the place after I'd finished. They fined me. It was worth it.

What it *did* get me out of was having to do an owner-builder course, various other pointless activities and having a series of inspections by people who generally knew less than me about how to build things. Not to mention actually drawing up plans, submitting them for approval before I started and having to apply for change approval every time I changed my mind. I should mention that the previous house I'd built was a 3 storey structure with nearly all the structural members made of welded posts & beams, also engineer certified after I'd drawn it up. I learned a couple of really valuable lessons from that build, the most valuable being to never again build anything more than a single storey high. Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

I pick my fights with the bureaucracy carefully - which is why I'd *never* do anything as idiotic as the guy who's lost his boat. That wasn't just prodding a wasp's nest with a stick, it was giving one a head-butt.

Jack is right about Tasmania. It's a quiet, backward place that is generally completely ignored by the rest of Australia. The water is cold & deep, lots of big sharks, there are few decent anchorages, almost no marinas, either no wind or it's blowing over 30 knots. I like it that way. Usually got a vacant mooring at the disposal of visitors crazy enough to get here.

FKT

I’m on my way. My sort of place. Mrs Ed had a life changing fortnight walking along your SW corner many years ago. It remains very close to her heart. 

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57 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Fah I was being a bit tongue in cheek as I'm actualy a bit of fan of Tasmania. It conjures up for me a really diverse range of thoughts from the mainland myth of Tamanian's having two headed stupidity, supurb natural images to producing world leaders in their relative fields. Putting aside the well knowns like scollup pies, MONA or the geological marvel of Flinders, name one place that produces these four diverse oddballs

1. Pills & Anzac Trust - When traditional grazing and agriculture was going through a rough patch Tasmania became the first place in Australia allowed to grow poppies for medicinal purposes, where at one stage produced half the world's medicinal supply. They did so without the need for big fences and nasty guard dogs. Unfortunately they have a headache of their own now to deal with being both competition and overdoses of prescription opioids causing greater regulation occuring worldwide. Some may have to go back to rearing fat lambs, but at least they can keep fences "as is" but go back to people stealing their hardwork for dinner. Though in New Zealand the fate of those lambs is probably worse.  :-)

2. Ocean Shit & Design - A Tasmanian born guy called Brodie Neill grew up in Hobarts Sandy Bay, playing on pristine beaches north of Bruny Is. He went on to live in London becoming a celebrated futuristic furniture designer with twisting and turning fibreglass and chipboard pieces etc. Three years ago he returned home to find his boyhood playground covered in ocean driven plastic waste. He now creates art and furniture pieces such as substituting inlaid marble and metals with materials derived from waste microplastics and nurdles lost in transit. He has also become a advocate of recycling ocean plastic by addressing Euro parliaments and the UN.

3. Orange Rocks or People - The Bay of Fires about 20 mile long on the north east coast was named by the British navigator and explorer Captain Tobias Furneaux, in 1773, when he noticed numerous fires, which led him to believe that the country was densely populated. What he probably saw was huge granite blocks that are colored bright orange by lichens. These orange lichens are a team play being a combination of algae that provides food by photosynthesis, while the fungus provides a protected environment for the algae. Maybe the Captain was right and there were a lot of people there around the campfire admiring natures art, bit like a 60,000 year old gallery version of MONA

4. Lucky & Smart - A guy called Bob Clifford a local boat builder also had the rights to the ferry service across the Derwant Riv that linked both sides of the city of Hobart. One evening in 1975 a bulk ore carrier ran into it putting the lot into the drink. Clifford using the capital from that windfall in passenger traffic, 9 million people (or 2/3 of Aust population then) in 2 years, went on to be the king of ferries, Incat, bringing to the world the large, alloy, fast wave piercing ferry and naval craft. Others followed so kickstarting a modern shipbuilding industry in Australia, a country that only seems to make tollways and housing these days.

Then again maybe Clifford was not lucky but a cunning bugger, taking the bulbs out of bridge Lead Lights that night? **

** apologies to dozen who died

images (78).jpeg

Drop-in-the-Ocean.jpg

bay-of-fires-tasmania-42.jpg

images (73).jpeg

FFS, Jack, I spend all that time running the place down and you let the punters in on some of the good stuff. Bass Strait is an absolute blessing really, it keeps people out.

I originally came down here 20 years ago on a 6 month contract to develop some computer software. Except for one stint working in the USA, I've made it my home ever since. Nor do I plan to change that.

But yeah - thanks for the kind words - I love the Freycinet area and Bruny Island is just across the Channel from my house.

FKT

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30 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

I’m on my way. My sort of place. Mrs Ed had a life changing fortnight walking along your SW corner many years ago. It remains very close to her heart. 

IMO the only really decent parts of Australia are the SW corner and the SE corner. The rest is either desert or infested with bogans.

FKT

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45 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

I’m on my way. My sort of place. Mrs Ed had a life changing fortnight walking along your SW corner many years ago. It remains very close to her heart. 

Make sure you drop in, a Kim and Susan enjoyed it.

the wooden boat festival,is in early february next year...

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5 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Sure. It complied with all the planning rules and most of the building code. What it didn't comply with was stupid and I simply paid a professional engineer to stamp my plans, which removed the construction from the local govt restrictions. I told them I'd built the place after I'd finished. They fined me. It was worth it.

What it *did* get me out of was having to do an owner-builder course, various other pointless activities and having a series of inspections by people who generally knew less than me about how to build things. Not to mention actually drawing up plans, submitting them for approval before I started and having to apply for change approval every time I changed my mind. I should mention that the previous house I'd built was a 3 storey structure with nearly all the structural members made of welded posts & beams, also engineer certified after I'd drawn it up. I learned a couple of really valuable lessons from that build, the most valuable being to never again build anything more than a single storey high. Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

I pick my fights with the bureaucracy carefully - which is why I'd *never* do anything as idiotic as the guy who's lost his boat. That wasn't just prodding a wasp's nest with a stick, it was giving one a head-butt.

Jack is right about Tasmania. It's a quiet, backward place that is generally completely ignored by the rest of Australia. The water is cold & deep, lots of big sharks, there are few decent anchorages, almost no marinas, either no wind or it's blowing over 30 knots. I like it that way. Usually got a vacant mooring at the disposal of visitors crazy enough to get here.

FKT

Like the Irish dairy farmer I recently met who converted an old barn to a house without permission,

the local council eventually caught up with him, he refused to comply with multiple fines and court orders and eventually spent two weeks in goal.

so he kept his house, and had his first holiday in twenty years...

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3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

FFS, Jack, I spend all that time running the place down and you let the punters in on some of the good stuff. Bass Strait is an absolute blessing really, it keeps people out.

I originally came down here 20 years ago on a 6 month contract to develop some computer software. Except for one stint working in the USA, I've made it my home ever since. Nor do I plan to change that.

But yeah - thanks for the kind words - I love the Freycinet area and Bruny Island is just across the Channel from my house.

FKT

You have no idea how chuffed I am about the fuckery in my life that is keeping me from getting down there.

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44 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

You have no idea how chuffed I am about the fuckery in my life that is keeping me from getting down there.

"Chuffed" as in delighted? 

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28 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

"Chuffed" as in delighted? 

Hmmm...you may take that as an ironic usage.

Irritated. Aggrieved. Annoyed. Miffed. Irked.

 

I've been "headed to 'Tassie next month" about six times in the last year and a half.

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5 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Hmmm...you may take that as an ironic usage.

Irritated. Aggrieved. Annoyed. Miffed. Irked.

 

I've been "headed to 'Tassie next month" about six times in the last year and a half.

I'm like the Harold Stassen of going to Tasmania.

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I do envy BJ for sailing to, and exploring the whole area. What an incredible journey you've had.

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19 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

I'm like the Harold Stassen of going to Tasmania.

BJ, you and me ( well maybe a few others) need to have a beer again. I’ll be in Hobart in February for the show, otherwise you know where I’m at.

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geez I cant imagine why Aussies would not just let anyone in and let em stay and use their services, go to school on citizen taxpayer dollars, etc.. without registering in any way whatsoever.  How cruel.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

I do envy BJ for sailing to, and exploring the whole area. What an incredible journey you've had.

Ajax that reply actually caused me to think of something and what I say here is not being critical of @B.J. Porter or other visitors.

Nearly 100% of world cruisers who have been to Australia and say they have seen Australia are blowing it out of their arse. I cannot think of a greater lie. 

Most arriving out of the Pacific would be lucky to see 600 mile or so of coastline between Sydney and say Brisbane where there is only a few places to pull over and even that requires a bit of bar crossing bravado Those that don't call it quits after crossing the pond, selling their boats and going home then clear north and do see the Qld coast. However other than maybe 300 mile of it cumulative, not that memorable and then combined with a weather timetable of getting around the top into Asia quick smart lucky to enjoy it unless willing to bridge seasons. The entire south east, south, west and north of the world's 7th continent they don't see.

It is like one saying they have seen America cruising between the Golden Gate and Marina del Rey. It is no fault of theirs but to cruise and capture say just half of Australia's coastline is fucking hardwork. The only statistical match to no overseas cruisers seeing that amount of Australia's coastline is Australian cruisers themselves. Between remoteness, wind patterns and cyclone season etc most probably know the Caribbean or Med better than their own backyard.

The best bits are the bits many rarely see. @Fah Kiew Tu is sitting on one spot, the SW coast around Esperance, the SW coast proper and Kimberly coast are if seen by other than those living there, and in some parts no one lives there. Some mining related impacts such as worker small boat traffic increases but once you get away from their postcode gets quiet.

I think it is a big island circumference thing. For instance I can lay claim to knowing landlocked Brazil pretty well and sailed in bits of the UK. However a family on a 4 week holiday in a fraction of my time spent, know the UK more than I do fucking 10 times over.

Probably should stop... I'm rambling or writing a Tourism Aust job application.

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What I meant by "whole" was that he's visited Australia, and New Zealand and is trying to get to Tasmania.  I chose my adjective hastily and poorly.

I get what you're saying. My 2nd cousin is a life long resident of Florence, IT and certified tour guide. She says people blow through for a few hours on tour buses, barely seeing anything but probably thinking they've seen it "all."  I had 2 weeks in Florence and barely scratched the surface. My poor cousin tried to guide us through the best museums and exhibits but I kept bogging her down with endless questions about a single sculpture or painting (to which she had all the answers!).

I apologized for slowing us down but she disagreed, instead thanking me for my curiosity.

Give BJ some credit. He's been in the area for sometime now, and has surely seen more than many casual visitors and he is a thinking man who I'm sure appreciates the history and culture of the region.

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18 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

We got it from the UK and quiet disobedience of the law is part of the culture.

Now what would be *really* bad is blind obedience to stupid laws. How do you reckon your country would score? Don't tell me you have no stupid laws, there are limits to what I'll believe.

FKT

Cmon You Aussies are a bunch of criminals we deported. Of course you will have contempt for the law even if you wrote them yourselves. 

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17 hours ago, Cisco said:

Nope....** limbs**  fall off eucalyptus trees esp river red gums and the like.... often when the weather is very still... do not camp under them... a falling limb will kill you very seriously dead....

Everthing in Australia will kill you, better a tree limb than a snake or a saltie.

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3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Ajax that reply actually caused me to think of something and what I say here is not being critical of @B.J. Porter or other visitors.

Nearly 100% of world cruisers who have been to Australia and say they have seen Australia are blowing it out of their arse. I cannot think of a greater lie. 

Most arriving out of the Pacific would be lucky to see 600 mile or so of coastline between Sydney and say Brisbane where there is only a few places to pull over and even that requires a bit of bar crossing bravado Those that don't call it quits after crossing the pond, selling their boats and going home then clear north and do see the Qld coast. However other than maybe 300 mile of it cumulative, not that memorable and then combined with a weather timetable of getting around the top into Asia quick smart lucky to enjoy it unless willing to bridge seasons. The entire south east, south, west and north of the world's 7th continent they don't see.

It is like one saying they have seen America cruising between the Golden Gate and Marina del Rey. It is no fault of theirs but to cruise and capture say just half of Australia's coastline is fucking hardwork. The only statistical match to no overseas cruisers seeing that amount of Australia's coastline is Australian cruisers themselves. Between remoteness, wind patterns and cyclone season etc most probably know the Caribbean or Med better than their own backyard.

The best bits are the bits many rarely see. @Fah Kiew Tu is sitting on one spot, the SW coast around Esperance, the SW coast proper and Kimberly coast are if seen by other than those living there, and in some parts no one lives there. Some mining related impacts such as worker small boat traffic increases but once you get away from their postcode gets quiet.

I think it is a big island circumference thing. For instance I can lay claim to knowing landlocked Brazil pretty well and sailed in bits of the UK. However a family on a 4 week holiday in a fraction of my time spent, know the UK more than I do fucking 10 times over.

Probably should stop... I'm rambling or writing a Tourism Aust job application.

No, you are completely right. I've seen one small stretch of the coastline and ventured in a bit. I've not gotten on a plane a and flown around, I've not sailed the other coasts.

There is a fuck-ton to see here, and I'm going to only see a small portion of it.

Part of that is economics and practicality, part of it is poor planning, part of it is having stupid shit to do while we're here - e.g. I've been out of Australia most of the last six months while the boat sat on a mooring.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

What I meant by "whole" was that he's visited Australia, and New Zealand and is trying to get to Tasmania.  I chose my adjective hastily and poorly.

I get what you're saying. My 2nd cousin is a life long resident of Florence, IT and certified tour guide. She says people blow through for a few hours on tour buses, barely seeing anything but probably thinking they've seen it "all."  I had 2 weeks in Florence and barely scratched the surface. My poor cousin tried to guide us through the best museums and exhibits but I kept bogging her down with endless questions about a single sculpture or painting (to which she had all the answers!).

I apologized for slowing us down but she disagreed, instead thanking me for my curiosity.

Give BJ some credit. He's been in the area for sometime now, and has surely seen more than many casual visitors and he is a thinking man who I'm sure appreciates the history and culture of the region.

Yesterday we were walking into Newport and we approached a woman waiting for a bus. When one came on the opposite side of the road she leapt up and tried to flag it to stop. Obviously the driver ignored her.

"You're on the wrong side of the road," I told her. "You need to be over there." (pointing to the stop across the street and down the road).

"I'm trying to get to Manly," she said. Australian accent, very clearly an Aussie.

"You're definitely on the wrong side then. If you get on here this will take you to Newport and Palm Beach."

"Oh."

"If you go over there and get on the 199, you can take that to Mona Vale, where you can switch to the 156 which will take you to Manly."

"Ok, thanks."

I didn't tell her she could take the 199 to Warringah mall and switch there for any number of buses for Manly as well, or that switching to a B1 in Mona Vale would be much faster to Warringah since it's an express, or that catching an L90 instead of the 199 was also express to Warringah if she got lucky.

"Thanks," she said. "Oh, do you know how long until the next bus?"

I whipped out my phone, touched an app..."Thirteen minutes, a 199. But you need to get over there, across the street."

 

It is entirely possible I've been here too long, when I can get from the Pittwater to the airport on public transportation without checking for directions.

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12 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

You can never be on Pittwater too long BJ....

It's a big world. I'd have liked to have gotten my shit together to get down to Tassie.

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53 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Yesterday we were walking into Newport and we approached a woman waiting for a bus. When one came on the opposite side of the road she leapt up and tried to flag it to stop. Obviously the driver ignored her.

"You're on the wrong side of the road," I told her. "You need to be over there." (pointing to the stop across the street and down the road).

"I'm trying to get to Manly," she said. Australian accent, very clearly an Aussie.

"You're definitely on the wrong side then. If you get on here this will take you to Newport and Palm Beach."

"Oh."

"If you go over there and get on the 199, you can take that to Mona Vale, where you can switch to the 156 which will take you to Manly."

"Ok, thanks."

I didn't tell her she could take the 199 to Warringah mall and switch there for any number of buses for Manly as well, or that switching to a B1 in Mona Vale would be much faster to Warringah since it's an express, or that catching an L90 instead of the 199 was also express to Warringah if she got lucky.

"Thanks," she said. "Oh, do you know how long until the next bus?"

I whipped out my phone, touched an app..."Thirteen minutes, a 199. But you need to get over there, across the street."

 

It is entirely possible I've been here too long, when I can get from the Pittwater to the airport on public transportation without checking for directions.

My feeling was that at a certain stage I would get to know a place we were visiting pretty well - how the buses, where to shop for various things, best bars and restaurants, etc. When that happened it was time to move on.

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13 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

IMO the only really decent parts of Australia are the SW corner and the SE corner. The rest is either desert or infested with bogans.

FKT

the (enormous) center is eye-openingly excellent  -- the bogans are friendly.

Just find somewhere else to be in summer.

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:


@B.J. PorterThe best bits are the bits many rarely see. @Fah Kiew Tu is sitting on one spot, the SW coast around Esperance, the SW coast proper and Kimberly coast are if seen by other than those living there, and in some parts no one lives there. Some mining related impacts such as worker small boat traffic increases but once you get away from their postcode gets quiet.

FFS, will you SHUT UP? You're leading them astray.

The SW is full of giant white pointer sharks and the killer whales are making a comeback too now we don't kill all the whales at Albany. All those granite islands off of Esperance? No sheltered anchorages and the bottom is smooth rock so won't hold. The Kimberley has huge tides, dirty water, uncharted reefs galore and salt water crocodiles. Neither area has marinas with hot & cold running water, free wifi and shore power so the trendoids can recharge their lithium battery packs for another 5 hours electric motoring to their next stop. Let's not even venture into discussing the dangers of the Wessel Islands chain or the Pellew group in the Gulf.

Let them clear into Bundaberg, sail down to that shallow bay outside BrisVegas, annoy LB and then head off somewhere else. We know what's here, no need to spread it around. Cruising yachties are some of the most tight-arse on the planet so there isn't even a decent amount of tourist dollars to gain.

BJ, dunno how your schedule is shaping up but you can clear from Hobart to NZ as late as the end of March and expect to have decent winds/weather. As was mentioned up-thread, the wooden boat show is on in Feb and that's well worth attending. I'll probably be hanging out there for at least some of the time and if any of you other blow-ins are here, I may have a spare mooring or 2 for boats up to 14m.

FKT

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4 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

FFS, will you SHUT UP? You're leading them astray.

The SW is full of giant white pointer sharks and the killer whales are making a comeback too now we don't kill all the whales at Albany. All those granite islands off of Esperance? No sheltered anchorages and the bottom is smooth rock so won't hold. The Kimberley has huge tides, dirty water, uncharted reefs galore and salt water crocodiles. Neither area has marinas with hot & cold running water, free wifi and shore power so the trendoids can recharge their lithium battery packs for another 5 hours electric motoring to their next stop. Let's not even venture into discussing the dangers of the Wessel Islands chain or the Pellew group in the Gulf.

Let them clear into Bundaberg, sail down to that shallow bay outside BrisVegas, annoy LB and then head off somewhere else. We know what's here, no need to spread it around. Cruising yachties are some of the most tight-arse on the planet so there isn't even a decent amount of tourist dollars to gain.

BJ, dunno how your schedule is shaping up but you can clear from Hobart to NZ as late as the end of March and expect to have decent winds/weather. As was mentioned up-thread, the wooden boat show is on in Feb and that's well worth attending. I'll probably be hanging out there for at least some of the time and if any of you other blow-ins are here, I may have a spare mooring or 2 for boats up to 14m.

FKT

Any chance you can give Moreton Bay another serve? You know, shallow muddy shithole ect ect. We still get a few cruisers come here that don't curl up into the fetal position under their bunk when they here the word tide or water depth less than 10 mts. 

Image result for moreton island

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2 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Any chance you can give Moreton Bay another serve? You know, shallow muddy shithole ect ect. We still get a few cruisers come here that don't curl up into the fetal position under their bunk when they here the word tide or water depth less than 10 mts. 

Image result for moreton island

Do you still have big sand dunes? I thought you'd mined them all to make concrete. Besides, someone earlier already made the point that you knew all 2 of the decent places to go in Moreton Bay.

Anyway, no, I'm bored with it. Lot more fertile territory in slagging off Sydney, truth be told. Lovely harbour, pity about the crowds. Probably the best thing is for visitors to clear in at Bundaberg and head north rather than south.

I quite like shoal water myself, being able to poke about in such places was one of the determining factors in picking the design I built. I don't really care if I run aground as long as it's not on the top of the tide.

FKT

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25 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

BJ, dunno how your schedule is shaping up but you can clear from Hobart to NZ as late as the end of March and expect to have decent winds/weather. As was mentioned up-thread, the wooden boat show is on in Feb and that's well worth attending. I'll probably be hanging out there for at least some of the time and if any of you other blow-ins are here, I may have a spare mooring or 2 for boats up to 14m.

Problem is we're rather hoping to be on our way from NZ to French Polynesia come April, so that doesn't leave a lot of time to sort the hinks and reprovision in NZ.

Yeah, we're heading back to the US West coast all ass-backwards like.

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

Problem is we're rather hoping to be on our way from NZ to French Polynesia come April, so that doesn't leave a lot of time to sort the hinks and reprovision in NZ.

Yeah, we're heading back to the US West coast all ass-backwards like.

A mate just delivered a forty something HR to Sydney, took them four days

just as easy to get to NZ from Tas..

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12 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

A mate just delivered a forty something HR to Sydney, took them four days

just as easy to get to NZ from Tas..

Just as hard.

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43 minutes ago, olaf hart said:
2 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Problem is we're rather hoping to be on our way from NZ to French Polynesia come April, so that doesn't leave a lot of time to sort the hinks and reprovision in NZ.

Yeah, we're heading back to the US West coast all ass-backwards like.

A mate just delivered a forty something HR to Sydney, took them four days

just as easy to get to NZ from Tas..

It is indeed. And if I had no work to do on this boat that hasn't done a serious offshore passage in two years I'd head down there straight off.

Oh, and if I wasn't bound for the states again in about five weeks.

Time is tight.

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1 hour ago, savoir said:

You will want to stay south in April. Maybe head for the Gambiers ?

That's the plan, yeah. Head due east from NZ until we can turn north, clear into the Gambiers then work our way up towards Tahiti.

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6 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Yesterday we were walking into Newport and we approached a woman waiting for a bus. When one came on the opposite side of the road she leapt up and tried to flag it to stop. Obviously the driver ignored her.

"You're on the wrong side of the road," I told her. "You need to be over there." (pointing to the stop across the street and down the road).

"I'm trying to get to Manly," she said. Australian accent, very clearly an Aussie.

"You're definitely on the wrong side then. If you get on here this will take you to Newport and Palm Beach."

"Oh."

"If you go over there and get on the 199, you can take that to Mona Vale, where you can switch to the 156 which will take you to Manly."

"Ok, thanks."

I didn't tell her she could take the 199 to Warringah mall and switch there for any number of buses for Manly as well, or that switching to a B1 in Mona Vale would be much faster to Warringah since it's an express, or that catching an L90 instead of the 199 was also express to Warringah if she got lucky.

"Thanks," she said. "Oh, do you know how long until the next bus?"

I whipped out my phone, touched an app..."Thirteen minutes, a 199. But you need to get over there, across the street."

 

It is entirely possible I've been here too long, when I can get from the Pittwater to the airport on public transportation without checking for directions.

Lots of the locals have never been south of the (Narrabeen) Bridge, Manly's like, the city.....

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1 hour ago, Fleetwood said:

Lots of the locals have never been south of the (Narrabeen) Bridge, Manly's like, the city.....

Why would you, all the good stuff is north of the harbour.

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

It is indeed. And if I had no work to do on this boat that hasn't done a serious offshore passage in two years I'd head down there straight off.

Oh, and if I wasn't bound for the states again in about five weeks.

Time is tight.

Up to you - you're the best judge of what the boat needs.

Facilities here are pretty good though and likely a lot cheaper than Sydney. Provided you don't have anything like rod rigging that is. I'm making some parts for a cruising boat ATM, he's overhauling his rig, mast is out on the hard. Fortunately the rod rigging is in good shape because he said Sydney is the nearest place capable of swaging new ends on the rods.

Sometime soon I must see if I can rebuild his Lewmar winches to a more satisfactory working state; the pawl pockets are quite worn & sloppy. So many jobs going on ATM.

FKT

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15 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Up to you - you're the best judge of what the boat needs.

Facilities here are pretty good though and likely a lot cheaper than Sydney. Provided you don't have anything like rod rigging that is. I'm making some parts for a cruising boat ATM, he's overhauling his rig, mast is out on the hard. Fortunately the rod rigging is in good shape because he said Sydney is the nearest place capable of swaging new ends on the rods.

Sometime soon I must see if I can rebuild his Lewmar winches to a more satisfactory working state; the pawl pockets are quite worn & sloppy. So many jobs going on ATM.

FKT

It's not the facilities need, I do most of my own work. It's the time, which I'd spend a lot of not working once we're on the move.

Among other issues. I can get most of what I need around here pretty easily. As easily as one can, here.

 

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1 minute ago, B.J. Porter said:

It's not the facilities need, I do most of my own work. It's the time, which I'd spend a lot of not working once we're on the move.

Among other issues. I can get most of what I need around here pretty easily. As easily as one can, here.

 

I often wonder how any of us got anything done before the internet and eBay.

FKT

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2 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I often wonder how any of us got anything done before the internet and eBay.

FKT

Who knows?

But speaking of procrastination, I have not one but TWO outboard carburetors to go clean and service.

I figured I'd wait until it was a million degrees out this afternoon to maximize the huffing effect with the carb cleaner.

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1 minute ago, B.J. Porter said:

Who knows?

But speaking of procrastination, I have not one but TWO outboard carburetors to go clean and service.

I figured I'd wait until it was a million degrees out this afternoon to maximize the huffing effect with the carb cleaner.

Cold, rain/hail squalls at 30+ knots gusting higher and might get to 16C here. Which is why I'm wasting time in the house instead of walking 15m to the workshop.

FKT

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3 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Who knows?

But speaking of procrastination, I have not one but TWO outboard carburetors to go clean and service.

I figured I'd wait until it was a million degrees out this afternoon to maximize the huffing effect with the carb cleaner.

Tomorrow will be better, perfect carby cleaning weather..........

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The REAL bottom line is that Australia lost the plot awhile ago, so NEVER go there, NEVER do business there, NEVER do anything involving Australians.

 

Simple.

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49 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

Tomorrow will be better, perfect carby cleaning weather..........

Nah, I did all my huffing today.

Hopefully we're done. I still need to get some fresh fuel for the stupid little Tohatsu engine to try to run that thing, but the big Yamaha seemed to be trucking along OK, finally.

Hopefully I won't eat those words tomorrow, it's been a couple of days getting the damned thing sorted.

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2 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

The REAL bottom line is that Australia lost the plot awhile ago, so NEVER go there, NEVER do business there, NEVER do anything involving Australians.

Simple.

Chill out. There are lots of other countries who ignore a criminal history and a liking for farm animals.

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END AUSTRALIAN ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION NOW!

 

721913_051415-ktrk-depps-dogs-new-img.jp

It's amazing to think the state didn't think to seize Johnny Depp's plane.

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58 minutes ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

END AUSTRALIAN ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION NOW!

 

721913_051415-ktrk-depps-dogs-new-img.jp

It's amazing to think a pity the state didn't think to seize Johnny Depp's plane.

FIFY.

FKT