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bacq2bacq

Is it just me, or is every Newick ever built as ugly as sin?

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Not enough discord and anarchy in the multihull threads. 

Everyone is so polite you'd think they are all Canadians or something, eh?

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12 minutes ago, bacq2bacq said:

Not enough discord and anarchy in the multihull threads. 

Everyone is so polite you'd think they are all Canadians or something, eh?

Nice try. But discord and anarchy only ensues when it´s entertaining, search Doug Lord or Dubin and learn from the masters.

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Definitely you.

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12 minutes ago, sail(plane) said:

Nice try. But discord and anarchy only ensues when it´s entertaining, search Doug Lord or Dubin and learn from the masters.

Take off, eh.  Exactly my point.  Now here's a boat with some beautiful lines:
attachment.php?attachmentid=1184542&d=1479427580

Now, DL, there's a designer who has mastered both style AND function.  Just ask him!

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It can't just be me.  Seriously:

dick-newick-rev-trimaran-3.jpg

WTF?  I'm sure there are "reasons" for it looking like this... 
Post a pretty Newick if you can find one and I might come around that they're not *all* ugly as sin.

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If you think Newicks are ugly then you must absolutely despise dolphins, orcas and birds of prey!

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3 hours ago, bacq2bacq said:

No.  Like I said I find Newick designs ugly.

Newick boats are recognizably Newick. Their curves have curves and flow.

Many newer multihulls have fewer curves and more straight lines. That's OK, too.

Hughes and Newick boats are unlikely to be confused. :p I love that there are options for us!

Randii

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As you surmised, it’s just you. We’ll cut you some slack, you’re from Ottawa.

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Bacq,

    Why don't you just google or better yet duckduckgo 'ugly as sin' to find some amusement for yourself and perhaps you might find merit in the lovely functional lines of Newicks boats?

This was one of the mildest examples of my suggested search.

Fish: Ugly As Sin | Jr's World At Large

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16 hours ago, weightless said:

It's just you. They're also lovely to sail.

3868790_20120312130033_1_LARGE.jpg

Zat Newick?  What be she? 

Very pretty!!

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I wouldn’t call them ugly, they just don’t appeal to me that much. 

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2 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

[That's a bit better, Proa.  Better, that is, than silently seething while beating on the downvote button.   You've found your voice, but please... find... sense... of ... humour... balance...]

Non-sequitur ad-hominem mundt: I get the seabird/nature thing (our F31 is an "Osprey"), but in many of his designs it just looks way too forced, and thus quite unnatural.  Wytold Rybczynski railed against "difference for differences' sake alone" in architecture.  It's maybe that that offends my eye in Newick's out-there designs. 

For the die-hards and disciples:
http://www.stevencallahan.net/images/proboat/newick-dec2010.pdf

I posted two shots of what I thought were pretty ugly Newicks.  Didn't hear anyone say those two were just pretty, and not pretty ugly.  Just sayin.

Anarchy counters: one pretty big Newick.  I'll even go so far as to punctuate that statement: one pretty, big Newick.  Still, score is 2:1.  ;-)

I think maybe Bruno nailed it:  it's a scale thing.  I'll grant Traveller ain't exactly as ugly as Rasputin's fish-face, but she's big, and maybe the least "Newicky" of them all?
As you scale them down, something (for me - this is a personal aesthetic issue, so relax...) just goes very very wrong.  The "new" is overcome by the "icky". 

There are pretty small Newicks out there.  Are there pretty, small Newicks out there?
Cheers,
b2b

 

 

 


 

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1 hour ago, bacq2bacq said:

"difference for differences' sake alone" in architecture

That's not this. The differences that offend you were incorporated to meet specific needs.

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@Wess I though you were in the market for a new boat, with an eye on large trimarans? Traveller just sold a month ago or so for < 299k (last asking price). I we didn't have kids this would be my boat.

Paul

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9 minutes ago, toolbar said:

@Wess I though you were in the market for a new boat, with an eye on large trimarans? Traveller just sold a month ago or so for < 299k (last asking price). I we didn't have kids this would be my boat.

Paul

We were in the market for a new boat.  The preference for many years was to go back to an offshore capable bridgedeck cat that would have minimal systems, a comfortable but not gold plated interior, and would be responsive, lively and fun to sail.  We did look at some tris but didn't want to give up bridgedeck living and an inside helm station.  We recently gave up finding a cat that could do this.  Many claim they can, but at least to our standards they can't.  Not even close.  But too much of a tangent...

I think most Newicks are pretty.

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1 hour ago, toolbar said:

@Wess I though you were in the market for a new boat, with an eye on large trimarans? Traveller just sold a month ago or so for < 299k (last asking price). I we didn't have kids this would be my boat.

Paul

Oh man I was ogling that Newick on YW for months - what a vessel!  Happy/sad to hear that it sold; I’d love to have been in a position to make an offer on it. Maybe next time. 

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The Newick with the green mainsail cover in the pic is, in my opinion, gorgeous.  An f-31, though an amazingly functional tool, not so easy on the eyes.  Seems like Newick was a strong believer in using natural forms to operate in the air/water interface.  Of course beauty in the eye of the beholder must be respected but Newick's designs have proven themselves to be remarkably effective whether or not you agree with his signature aesthetic.  

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31 minutes ago, Groucho Marx said:

Real ugly? This is a Tricia and one of the earliest foil versions, early 1980s.

mokihi.jpg

 

That is a cool photo!  I noticed what appeared to be the boat's name (Mokihi) in the image url:
http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2018_11/mokihi.jpg.5dc3154952ae0415cc9296ef09b0188c.jpg

And with a little Googling, found this page where you(?) posted that image and discussed the boat:
https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/modernising-a-horstman-tri.43743/page-3

And this SA thread where @coxcreek said "Mokihi, a Tricia 36, still owned (I think) by Max Purnell from Waitakaruru":

 

And this very interesting page by Sven Yrvind where he tells wonderful tales about meeting Tom Follett and Dick Newick in 1975 and working for Dick on Martha's Vineyard for a year, building three Val trimarans (“How can you have been living without epoxy”, Dick asked?) and Rory Nugent's proa for the 1976 OSTAR (Six of Dick’s boats were entered four of them Val’s.).  He drops a long list of well-known names who were around Dick Newick at that time - fascinating stuff!

http://www.yrvind.com/videophoto/outher-boats/newicks-trimarans/

Quote

THOUGHTS 40 YEARS LATER

Dick was disappointed that after all he thought me I never converted to a multihull sailor. 1975 multihull designers were rebels against the establishment. That has changed completely nowadays-even America Cup races are done in multihulls. I learnt there are many ways to sail but what is important is to clearly define the requested capabilities. Speed is the most expensive item. Of course, when racing nothing else counts. I sail for other reasons. If your boat is not so fast that it can sail away from storms you better make her seaworthy instead if you like to survive, luckily that is neither difficult nor expensive assuming you have a small boat.

val_trimaran2.jpg
A Val trimaran

This (below) is the 1985 Newick “TRICIA” Trimaran ALEGRA (Spanish for “she makes me happy”), built by Walter Greene:
https://www.blockislandmaritime.com/boats-for-chartersale/sailboats/1985-newick-tricia-trimaran/

4730240_20140606132403511_1_XLARGE-1.jpg.8fe2179759ace4d838869bc9de6cf732.jpg

Beautiful!!

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3 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Wess,

    You still interested in a 53 tri?

    PM me if so.

Thanks; no.  Not in a position where I am ready to talk about it but lets just say I know where you can find a REALLY nice F27F for sale VERY affordably for the next  ~72 hours or so before she gets listed and the price goes up.  Now I am of to figure out if state title-ing or USCG documentation is a better option for a boat based in MD.  And, no I aint giving up anything else, LOL.  Not yet anyway. Other than saying some like to talk but never walk.  I am very fortunate to have a wife that also believes in walking the talk.  But this is way... off the topic of pretty Newick boats.  Lets go back to that.

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Be careful with any offer that seems too good to be true. I answered an add earlier in the week for a local sale of a F31 R that was a 'husband took a new job out of town and I have to close in a hurry to join him' sort of thing. Boat was listed on Craigs List as only 20 miles from me so I asked for an address to go inspect the boat and got a full survey and a lot of photos that hadn't been on CL. Boat looked great and I noted a CG Doc number and looked it up and found that the boat was still registered to a guy in NE and I did a couple of searches and found his phone number. Turned out he had listed the boat on a legitimate online boat sales site and the scammers on CL had taken his photos and even contacted him to get the survey and doctored the whole thing for their scam. He was very curious as to how I  had gotten his number and together we are going after the scammers. He had the boat listed at $90K and the CL scammers were asking $20K. Fuck that sort of scam. I had just gone through and almost identical scenarion on an Airstream trailer about a week earlier so saw the signs right away.

If they tell you the boat is awaiting shipping to you and they want you to pay through Ebay motors then that is the first red flag.  The boat supposedly in Mobile that I could have driven to in an hour to see for myself somehow ended up in Galveston at the shippers and all I had to do was to pay for the boat via PayPal gift cards or some BS and they would ship it to me at their expense. I would have 5 days to inspect the boat and if anything didn't meet my desires I could back out and get my money back. They are trying to make it appear that Ebay motors is acting as escrow but that is BS too. 

    You should have grabbed VIRGIN FIRE when I suggested. She is all dolled up now and working as a daysail boat out of St Martin and looking good. 

image.thumb.png.8d40ef2a1e82c79c10214737e001d7e1.png

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I remember seeing Little Wing  [a Bridge deck Val] in Tahiti in front of my house.  I studied her for days, and never found a bad curve.  She was perfectly integrated.

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12 minutes ago, guerdon said:

I remember seeing Little Wing  [a Bridge deck Val] in Tahiti in front of my house.  I studied her for days, and never found a bad curve.  She was perfectly integrated.

"Riding with the wind..." :)

 

 

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Thanks for the memories.  I lived down the hill from Jimi, on Maui during "the Rainbow Bridge' era.  It was the best of times.  It was the worst of times.

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Love these boats, one of my favourites was 'Hot Water' which was part of the sailing scene at Easter in Brisbane in the mid nineties

 

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Personally, I've never been taken by the look Dick Newick's tri's with the exception of Three Cheers that I really did like. I also don't speak Newick, and I do not think I am a reincarnation of a Polynesian boat-builder. No Ama's, Aka's, or Vaka's for me, they're floats, crossbeams and main hulls.

However, I did get a sail on an early version of his Val open-wing trimaran that was fun. My hat goes off to those who have sailed that very tiny (inside) boat across the Atlantic. All the room of a coffin but with sitting headroom.

Dick Newick did generate significant interest in multihulls, and for that I am grateful.

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Watching this excellent live stream this morning on YouTube: Route du Rhum: le grand départ

and spotted what at first glance looked like a Newick trimaran, but no: https://www.yachtingworld.com/blogs/elaine-bunting/vintage-solo-race-for-loick-peyron-104

Quote

She is Happy, designed by Walter Greene, and a sistership to Olympus Photo, which Canadian Mike Birch sailed to an enthralling victory in the first Route du Rhum in 1978.

Birch had been racing the little trimaran against much bigger monohulls, and Michel Malinovsky was expected to win in his then huge cigar-shaped 70-footer Kriter. This was in the days of traditional navigation and communication only by radio, and to spectators’ surprise when Kriter, the leading boat, came in sight Olympus Photo was there too, in close pursuit. The two skippers duelled right to the line at Point à Pitre in Guadeloupe, and to everyone’s amazement Olympus Photo overhauled the bigger yacht and, after 23 days at sea, Mike Birch won by 98 seconds.

Sailed this year by Loïck Peyron: https://www.facebook.com/loickpeyron

ob_b7f4e5_happy-5.JPG.2b16c5eaa25526436d9d8352c83a718b.JPG

SAM_2219.JPG.0020e4cdf7f25c3e3616f7f89d0bd0f2.JPG

 

Not a Newick but it's close (in the family).  Walter is truly a legend in his own right: http://www.greene-marine.com/

https://www.yachtingworld.com/extraordinary-boats/a-capella-the-invincible-little-yellow-trimaran-113009

Quote

Part of the magic of this November 2018 edition will be a widely anticipated friendly showdown between three Walter Greene 12m (36ft) trimarans. The trio are near-sisterships to the tiny Olympus Photo that won the first ever Route du Rhum in 1978.

When skipper Mike Birch and the seemingly diminutive trimaran stole victory on the finish line by 98 seconds from under the nose of Michael Malinovski’s much fancied 21m monohull Kriter V, after 23 days of racing, it ensured the Route du Rhum would be forever synonymous with multihulls.

 

Stumbled across this 3D CAD model done in SketchUp (a terrible choice for boats but it's free and otherwise very cool):
https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/u555b2bf2-ddf2-4ce8-8d23-d18b77ca0357/LOICK-PEYRON-TRIMARAN-HAPPY

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Shit I have been silently biting my tongue for all these years, because I thought I was the only one. Newicks are ugly, they don't remind me of a bird or a dolphin, they remind me of an overweight cow.

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17 hours ago, guerdon said:

I remember seeing Little Wing  [a Bridge deck Val] in Tahiti in front of my house.  I studied her for days, and never found a bad curve.  She was perfectly integrated.

A friend of mine, Carl Drews, with help from Bob De Long (builder of Stars and Strips AC Cat) built Little Wing in Capistrano, CA.  Carl kept it in Dana Point Harbor. The guy he sold it to kept it in Ventura for a while before heading to the South Pacific on it.  He eventually sold it in New Zealand IIRC. I use to race with Carl on it often.  It made me a huge fan of Newick.  I happen to believe that Newick's boats are beautiful.  But, even those of you that find them ugly, need to go for a sail on one.  They are the most sea kindly and fun boats I have ever sailed on.  They surf easily and well and are fast.  Downsides: wet (fast is wet);  most are designed to be sailed from the cockpit, not the windward ama; lack headroom (I am 6'3" tall).  But, I am wiling accept the negatives because, IMO, they are extremely fun to sail and pleasing to look at.

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On 11/2/2018 at 3:03 PM, Plausible said:

Newicks get an extra buck per tonne as landfill.

More tonnes in a c&c 43

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How about this one, It's a Newick Val iii in Wellington New Zealand.

And is a video  of sailing in a bit of breeze  

 

 

Newic val iii.jpeg

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Mizzmo (and others), there, you can finally relax, you're now out of the closet on this aesthetic-cum-political/religious issue in the multi-space.  You are not alone, and it's not just me, either (but be prepared to have your "SA reputation" whacked for expressing your opinion - too funny... proa, any comment on that?  ;-).

The pretty shots of Val-III's all seem to be from the front.  Here's a nice one below (Canadian, eh, to get bacq on-topic) in wood.   Those floats now look kinda C-class-ish, with lots of buoyancy forward now... (Newick-lovers, better sit down and prepare yourselves for some boat-porn in the next shots):

2010_0108_153253.jpg?w=1200&h=

Hard to call that ugly.  Even a bit Vic-Carpenter-esque given the wood construction... from the front.  Butt: from behind:

2010_0108_153434.jpg?w=1200&h=

ARGH!  Why the boxy junk in the trunk?
2005 0407 031435   25843562-full.jpg

AACK!
M. le maire 001

The square lines on that cockpit... Doh!  Sooo close.. I think "incongruous" might be the word I'm looking for here.

Why, Dick, WHY????
b2b

PS: I'm sure they're lovely to sail, and props to Newick for being out there early, and still, and for designing multis that sail safely across oceans faster than scalded cats, or monos, and and and... bacq2topic: is that cockpit aesthetically appealing?

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Hard to see anything bad with how pretty that woody is...

I lean more toward catamarans... even there, you can see differences in Newick designs.

Pooka looks sleek and sexy:
78592405gallery_wm.jpg78592404gallery_wm.jpg
She's even sexier without the canvas bridgedeck and with those beams exposed: https://boats.waa2.com/detail?id=8ae23d0be5c78b098b4f06a2616487f3&amp;q=spronk catamaran ... but the canvas does give shelter to the otherwise-open bridgedeck, which has to make her a more comfy crusier.

Reaching back further in time, here's Ms. Patty:
MsPatty2.JPG image.png.b1b270360f1832b1be461787bb61ff4b.png

Different horses for different courses, I guess... both look good to my eye, but for different reasons. Pooka to sail, and Patty to ogle.

Randii

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2 hours ago, bacq2bacq said:

Mizzmo (and others), there, you can finally relax, you're now out of the closet on this aesthetic-cum-political/religious issue in the multi-space.  You are not alone, and it's not just me, either (but be prepared to have your "SA reputation" whacked for expressing your opinion - too funny... proa, any comment on that?  ;-).

The pretty shots of Val-III's all seem to be from the front.  Here's a nice one below (Canadian, eh, to get bacq on-topic) in wood.   Those floats now look kinda C-class-ish, with lots of buoyancy forward now... (Newick-lovers, better sit down and prepare yourselves for some boat-porn in the next shots):

2010_0108_153253.jpg?w=1200&h=

Hard to call that ugly.  Even a bit Vic-Carpenter-esque given the wood construction... from the front.  Butt: from behind:

2010_0108_153434.jpg?w=1200&h=

ARGH!  Why the boxy junk in the trunk?
2005 0407 031435   25843562-full.jpg

AACK!
M. le maire 001

The square lines on that cockpit... Doh!  Sooo close.. I think "incongruous" might be the word I'm looking for here.

Why, Dick, WHY????
b2b

PS: I'm sure they're lovely to sail, and props to Newick for being out there early, and still, and for designing multis that sail safely across oceans faster than scalded cats, or monos, and and and... bacq2topic: is that cockpit aesthetically appealing?

Don't go attributing that box on the composite VAL III to Dick. Looks more like an afterthought that the owner came up with after 6 or more years of building to that point. You will see lots of variance on some of Dick's boats of the same design whether they were wing AKA or open deck (two beam) configuration. Cockpits were minimal for the single handers and if an owner wanted a 'chariot' cockpit they sometimes you see that sort of thing. Incongruous does describe it perfectly. 

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16 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Don't go attributing that box on the composite VAL III to Dick. Looks more like an afterthought that the owner came up with after 6 or more years of building to that point. You will see lots of variance on some of Dick's boats of the same design whether they were wing AKA or open deck (two beam) configuration. Cockpits were minimal for the single handers and if an owner wanted a 'chariot' cockpit they sometimes you see that sort of thing. Incongruous does describe it perfectly. 

Gorgeous bright finish wooden boat!  Those photos and many more can be found here:

MASTERPIECE IN WOOD: 2X TRIMARAN “VAL III” IN CANADA
September 13, 2015 · by Skipper JayR
https://trienthusiasts.wordpress.com/2015/09/13/masterpiece-in-wood-2x-trimaran-val-iii-in-canada/

Quote

These two beautifully Trimarans of 30′ foot length (9.1m) are based on the design Val III by multihull specialist Dick Newick (1926-2013) and both have been built in Canada (French part) by two sailing fellows. One was setup completely in wood… another version exists “in white” (with re-painting into red/white) with a high-tech Carbon mast.

(Rec.: The photos are from the blog site http://valiii.over-blog.com were you find a fully documentation of the different boat building phases.)

These videos too:

 

 

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It's not just you.  I find them "different".  I figure the designs are "just 'cause he could" and watched too many Jetson's cartoons.

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Russell’s narrative about how he was inspired to create this boat, based upon Dick Newick’s original Tremolino design, was personally one of my favorite chapters in the book "Small Trimarans".

In my book, she is a hot looking, Newick inspired, F-boat killing coffin-camper!

hum-1.jpg

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Not a Newick but influenced by his designs; this is one of Nigel Irens from 30 odd years ago, Gordano Goose - and is a performance work of art?

GordanoGoose .jpg

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Don't go attributing that box on the composite VAL III to Dick. Looks more like an afterthought that the owner came up with after 6 or more years of building to that point. .... Incongruous does describe it perfectly. 

Ya know, Rasp, that's what I thought at first - "Hey, here's a smaller Newick I don't find icky."  But then every shot I could find (from the rear) of Val IIIs showed the same butt-box, in wood, composite, whatever. Thus the extra photos of the other boats... so nah, I still gotta pin the incongruity on the designer.   Until I see some pics of Val IIIs with something prettier to sit in, perhaps.

Humdinger does indeed look like she'd crush the old F31, and doesn't look ugly (to me), but then... isn't a Newick.  Nor is Iren's Goose...  hmnnn.

 

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I was told a great story about Gordano Goose by a couple of gents from Isle of Man. They owned a very nice Newick 38 named PANACHE. They had some good stories about their mis-adventures on that boat too but the one that comes to mind now is about the skinny little Nigel Irens designed GG. I forget which of my storyteller friends was helping Nigel cross the English Channel on the boat when the weather got really nasty and the low profile boat was nearly awash as in this photo.

Image result for Gordano Goose

 

   GG was Nigels first trimaran design and as things come back to me I remember the name of the chap, Dickie Gomes. His Newick was DOWNTON FLYER and I think was named after he and his partners restaurant on the Isle. Dickie had done very well in an early Round Great Britain race and Nigel must have learned a lot from Dickie I presume, I know I sure  did!

   More background on Dickie

But he has always also lived for speed sailing, and he made his mark internationally in 1982 with the 40ft Dick Newick-designed trimaran Downtown Flyer, which he built and campaigned in partnership with Brian Law, who continues to sail with him and was one of the crew aboard Ainmara for Saturday's Leinster Trophy defence.

Downtown Flyer's successes included a win in the two-handed Round Britain & Ireland Race. After two hectic years, she was sold, but the speed bug had bitten. In 1986, Gomes skippered the 80ft catamaran Novanet in a challenge to the round Ireland record established in May 1986 by Robin Knox-Johnston's 60ft catamaran British Airways, which in turn had shaved a few hours over the superb time set by the great Denis Doyle's Frers 51 Moonduster in the 1984 Round Ireland Race.

Although Novanet's challenge was made in November 1986 in ferocious weather with fourteen hours of darkness in every twenty-four, the Gomes campaign still succeeded, and succeeded so well that his new record stood for seven years until September 1993, when Steve Fossett – his crew including Cathy MacAleavey and Con Murphy of the National YC - zapped round with the 60ft trimaran Lakota, setting a time so good it still stands today despite several challenges.

 

    Here is a photo of DOWNTON FLYER under construction

downtown flyer7

 

    Plans 

Image result for dicky gomes downton flyer

   Anyway, the way I remember the story was that Nigel had to do a shakedown race for a double handed race and Dickie went along with him. When the conditions got to their worse Nigel was beginning to wonder why he didn't give his first trimaran design more freeboard and had just lost his lunch in his lap much to his dismay. He was lamenting his discomfort to Dickie who told him, 'Just wait a second...' when another huge wave swept the little tri end for end washing things clean as a whistle. Dickie pointed this out to Nigel and said 'lets get on with it, nothing for you to cry about now!'

Another version of the PANACHE design showing the daggerboard further aft and a trim board forward.

Image result for panache trimaran

In digging up some of these photos I was reminded of an even better Dickie Gomes sea story but that will have to wait!

Dickie is still going strong it seems but now as part of the Old Gaffers Association.

Image result for dicky gomes downton flyer trimaran

 

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On 11/5/2018 at 12:00 PM, the saint said:

How about this one, It's a Newick Val iii in Wellington New Zealand.

And is a video  of sailing in a bit of breeze  

 

 

Newic val iii.jpeg

I heard some idiot sailed this particular one from Auckland down to Wellington in winter. Bet that was cold and wet.

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7 hours ago, Groucho Marx said:

Not a Newick but influenced by his designs; this is one of Nigel Irens from 30 odd years ago, Gordano Goose - and is a performance work of art?

GordanoGoose .jpg

Gorgeous.  Nigel is definitely  an artist as well.

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20 hours ago, olsurfer said:

Russell’s narrative about how he was inspired to create this boat, based upon Dick Newick’s original Tremolino design, was personally one of my favorite chapters in the book "Small Trimarans".

In my book, she is a hot looking, Newick inspired, F-boat killing coffin-camper!

hum-1.jpg

If the Admiral hated boats and sailing, well, I could be pretty happy with this one.

However, if this was the only boat I had for the Admiral to join me on, she WOULD hate boats and sailing.....  different strokes....

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On 11/3/2018 at 5:36 PM, Wess said:

Thanks; no.  Not in a position where I am ready to talk about it but lets just say I know where you can find a REALLY nice F27F for sale VERY affordably for the next  ~72 hours or so before she gets listed and the price goes up.  Now I am of to figure out if state title-ing or USCG documentation is a better option for a boat based in MD.  And, no I aint giving up anything else, LOL.  Not yet anyway. Other than saying some like to talk but never walk.  I am very fortunate to have a wife that also believes in walking the talk.  But this is way... off the topic of pretty Newick boats.  Lets go back to that.

Ok Wess.... your 72 hours are up, near enough.

Let's have it!

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2 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Ok Wess.... your 72 hours are up, near enough.

Let's have it!

Get me off line.  Not putting it out for all here.  T'aint done yet anyway.  Other side had some issues re our acquisition.  So shall see.

Unless of course you want the F27F.  Gonna really really hate to see that boat go but its gotta to make room.

Can't we go back to Newicks LOL. 

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23 hours ago, bacq2bacq said:

2010_0108_153253.jpg?w=1200&h=

 

2010_0108_153434.jpg?w=1200&h=

 

Jesus!  That is nearly the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.

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39 minutes ago, Wess said:

Jesus!  That is nearly the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.

Not a bad find, eh?  I surprised myself.  Proa previously provided links to more shots.  From the aesthetic angle, I do wish Newick hadn't given up on the curves when he got down to drawing the cockpit, but even an ugly butt can't make supermodel-sexy from the front as "ugly as sin" from behind.
Image result for wood "val iii" canada

So: contentious thread-title double-disproven, IMHO.  I am not alone, but even this beholder sees some real beauty in this one.  Problem, though: I have a feeling if one sailed with it, one would only ever see the boat from behind ;-)

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hobbit4.jpg

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44 minutes ago, bacq2bacq said:

 

Not a bad find, eh?  I surprised myself.  Proa previously provided links to more shots.  From the aesthetic angle, I do wish Newick hadn't given up on the curves when he got down to drawing the cockpit, but even an ugly butt can't make supermodel-sexy from the front as "ugly as sin" from behind.
Image result for wood "val iii" canada

So: contentious thread-title double-disproven, IMHO.  I am not alone, but even this beholder sees some real beauty in this one.  Problem, though: I have a feeling if one sailed with it, one would only ever see the boat from behind ;-)

In an epic thread on the Laser litigation @tillerman and I took to responding to a certain "gentleman" I canntt remember by way of music videos with a message.  So with regards to your comments on said vessel's fine posterior, I offer these thoughts...

 

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1 hour ago, Wess said:

Jesus!  That is nearly the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.

 

53 minutes ago, bacq2bacq said:

 

Not a bad find, eh?  I surprised myself.  Proa previously provided links to more shots.  From the aesthetic angle, I do wish Newick hadn't given up on the curves when he got down to drawing the cockpit, but even an ugly butt can't make supermodel-sexy from the front as "ugly as sin" from behind.
Image result for wood "val iii" canada

So: contentious thread-title double-disproven, IMHO.  I am not alone, but even this beholder sees some real beauty in this one.  Problem, though: I have a feeling if one sailed with it, one would only ever see the boat from behind ;-)

Not so sure I would want to leave that cockpit to attend to any issues given the slippery finish.

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3 hours ago, Wess said:

... with regards to your comments on said vessel's fine posterior, I offer these thoughts...

Fine.  As in OK, but, "Fine: adj; 1) of high quality; 2) thin..."

Wess, I feel compelled to retort in-kind, I mean: "How can I leave this.... behind?"

 

Starting to feel more anarchic around here again... 

cheers, b

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No, not ugly as sin, SEXY as sin. Fast and strong and wet and wild. SEXY.

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Since I posted earlier in this thread, I've given some thought to the devotees of Newick designs. I have come to the realization that fans of Dick Newick are similar to groupies of products of Apple Computer. Each has a strong devotion for their respective interest, and each speaks their adopted lingo.

Mr. Newick designed some race winning multihulls, but the sailing world has advanced considerably since that time. From what I have read, Mr. Newick believed that he was a reincarnation of a Polynesian boat-builder and used antiquated Polynesian terms for various parts of his boats.

However, it is interesting that I have not read "Newick Speak" on websites from Francis Joyon (IDEC), Thomas Coville (Sodebo),  François Gabart (Macif), Armel Le Cléac'h (Bank Populaire IX), Sébastien Josse (Maxi Edmond de Rothschild - Gitana 17), etc... On those sites I read about floats, crossbeams, and main hulls, not Ama's, Aka's, or Vaka's.

Should we revert to Olde or Middle English?

For example, I doth not speaketh Newick!

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Not sure what all the fuss about language is, for the Hawaiians I know, using the Polynesian name is second nature, if not first. They say and think them automatically and when it comes to canoes it's fine, they fit. For multis with different proportionality do as you please, menefreghismo. One can appreciate different aspects without politicizing it. Newick didn't always get volume, rocker, and clearance relationships perfect, tended to work better with larger vessels. His lines changed over time as he learned more, as did everyone. Some of his solutions still work well.

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2 hours ago, Bruno said:

Newick didn't always get volume, rocker, and clearance relationships perfect, tended to work better with larger vessels. His lines changed over time as he learned more, as did everyone. Some of his solutions still work well.

Yep, context matters. His early designs were created in a world where there were no light, stiff FRP boats, few high performance multihulls, where engineering was hand work and information traveled by post. The knowledge, materials, and construction methods he could call on limited his options and theories. Yet, with a pencil, a bit of paper, some timber and a touch of glue Newick made boats that are fast, strong, light and seaworthy even by today's standards.

None of that makes the boats more or less pleasing to the eye, I suppose. But I get the feeling from some of the posts above that some folks think DN was going for a goofy look in the service of some perverse aesthetic. I think he was more interested in function and his forms followed that. Of course, the state of the art has evolved.

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I see this as one of his finest.

A special treat for all the Newickphiles

 

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.

PS WTF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

proa1-l.jpg

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19 hours ago, overlay said:

I see this as one of his finest.

A special treat for all the Newickphiles

 

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.

PS WTF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

proa1-l.jpg

Ha! I lived aboard this boat for a summer on a mooring in Vineyard Haven while working for Dick. Right in front of the ferry dock. It was very much like sleeping in a coffin. We sailed her a few times trying different rudder set-ups. Oars for steering did not work well. 

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2 hours ago, Lat 18 said:

Ha! I lived aboard this boat for a summer on a mooring in Vineyard Haven while working for Dick. Right in front of the ferry dock. It was very much like sleeping in a coffin. We sailed her a few times trying different rudder set-ups. Oars for steering did not work well. 

When was that?  http://dicknewickboats.com/proa.html

Dick was a graceful, creative and enthusiastic man with a wry sense of humor and a strong disdain for the "Immaculate Deception" of politics - he had that phrase, and others like it, printed on bumper stickers.  Really fun and inspiring guy to be around.  His boats are a blast to sail, not known for commodious interiors though that evolved in later years.  Miss him!

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