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LionessRacing

Occasional/special tools for club to share

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Just replaced some battery cables, which necessitated purchasing a cable cutter and lug crimper, suitable for working in situ. 

Dont expect to need them again, and don’t want to store, so donated to the club to start a special tool collection for occasional use. Will probably donate my rig tension gauge as well as the outboard motor mover I put in a few years back. 

What else would be worthy of stocking the club’s use once or twice in a decade closet ? 

 

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"Don't want to store". 

I follow that but anything that goes into a shared tool box will be pinched or wrecked in no time.

It might work if there's one key, held by one "responsible adult".

Good on you for trying.

I'm a member of a small group who share our gear, including hydraulic crimper, mooring punt with chain-lift, sail-making skills, electrical and engineering, spray painting, glass and resin, hole-saws, various welders etc.  It works well but it pays to keep track of who borrowed what.

The local sailing club includes the above members but there are twice as many lawyers / doctors / pilots etc who are best kept well away from tools.

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Had not thought of the sewing stuff, have an old Viking 320 that’s made a few sails & covers a Hotknife and 8’ straight batten that would get someone started on repairs/incidental work. Won’t be putting my Festool sanders out there but the porter cable buffer might be a suitable tool . 

Agree on the hazards of the ignorant, unskilled, venal and careless around tools, beats having them at the leeward mark.  

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I lose more damn tools by lending them out, end up going and buying them, then remember who has them and attempt to retrieve or just let them have to old one.  Good on ya mate for the effort.

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I don't generally lend tools. I learned my lesson (once and for all) when against my better judgement I loaned a power washer to a neighbor and it came back sounding like it worked but not actually working. That was a $350 mistake.

Now, on the rare occasion when I do lend a tool, it's accompanied by "The Talk", which involves a long look directly in the eyes and consent to 1: you break it you buy it and 2: I'm the one who decides whether you broke it. 

 

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You can get a medium quality hydraulic cable terminal swaging tool on Amazon and a decent pair of lopping shears that do a good job on copper cable for about 100 cuts retail for $100, combined.

Giving them to your club is, essentially, throwing them away.

So this thread is essentially about encouraging other people to throw away their tools, too. Why?

 

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I don't generally lend tools. I learned my lesson (once and for all) when against my better judgement I loaned a power washer to a neighbor and it came back sounding like it worked but not actually working. That was a $350 mistake.

Now, on the rare occasion when I do lend a tool, it's accompanied by "The Talk", which involves a long look directly in the eyes and consent to 1: you break it you buy it and 2: I'm the one who decides whether you broke it. 

 

I try not to borrow tools either: doing so creates a debt to the lender, who will expect reciprocation. A family that was a long time friend of our family was a great example - they'd lend you anything they had without reservation. They'd ask to borrow the same. The trouble was, everything they had or touched was very soon a complete wreck. Sometimes tied back together with an old lamp cord, etc. Whatever you lent them came back the same.

Even professionals are bad. I have a large collection of power tools, some of which were purchased 30 years ago. They have been cared for, and look nearly new. Contractors (good ones, and friends of mine) are working on my house and ask to borrow some of them as they've left their's at the shop. They'd say, "did you just buy this?", and in 3 hours use, more wear and damage is put on them in 30 years of may occasional use. My brothers are the same, though not quite a bad. 

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In my area there are tool libraries, one for bike repair the other for more general household use. You could set something up with limited hours where tools a checked in and out with inspections etc. Of course this ends up being more work for whoever organizes it. But a small fee might offset that. I would be happy to pay $5-10 for a few hours use of a crimper rather than buy one never to use again.

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Personally I have always  invested in the tools I need, or where possible rented from a commercial source if it’s in the category of use rarely (stump grinding, excavator, skid steer etc)  I don’t lend nor borrow ongoing use tools, except in accessing the ones I gave my stepson when we downsized to a townhouse, with the understanding that access was part of the gift  (drill press, power washer etc)

Donating ~$50 (there are cheaper and adequate mechanical crispers) worth of tools I am done with costs me nothing, and might benefit a club member, who wouldn’t need to make the purchase and wait the week to do the project, or drive 60 miles to get their own from home, which was why I ended up with multiple small shop vacuums  

 

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Never lend tools or books - to anyone who doesn't live with you.

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Specifically for new battery cables, I took a different route to special tools, time, and materials.  I ordered them prefabricated from a reputable online source. 

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Our club workshop has generic tools that members can borrow or use there.  The drill press and vice have been handy for us, along with the nicopress crimpers and rivet gun. If people don't return the tools the club has to buy new ones, which increases dues.  Since people don't want increased dues, most of the tools get returned.  Egregious offenders can also be billed if they lose a big-ticket item;  you have to ask to borrow anything, so they know who had it last.   

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Hand tools are essentially free; they generally pay for themselves in their first use. Power tools take a bit longer; stationary tools, not so much.

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I think it's the "arm tools" that the OP is talking about: lug crimpers and copper cable cutters. It's about a $300 investment for both and if you cheap out, you get crappy knockoffs that won't give you good results. if you'll only be doing one job, it's hard to justify the cost.

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Most tools in the electronics world are like that, $1000+ crimpers etc. Use them for one job then they can sit on the shelf for years collecting dust.

I've thought about setting up a small shop in one of our club storage sheds with a drill press, vice, things like hacksaws, nice pope rivet gun, swaging tools, maybe some drills/sanders etc. It wouldn't cost that much, probably less than $1000 which I may save in gas money alone carting the stuff around or having to drive off to buy something locally. The trouble is all the statements raised here-tools walking off, inexperienced users beating them to death, experienced users who don't care beating them to death etc. Then there are other issues like liability that can be raised (i.e increased insurance for the club), or we could point to the club parking rules which specify "no heavy maintenance on club grounds", which depending on your definition could be violated by having a workshop available...

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On 11/4/2018 at 6:15 AM, IStream said:

I don't generally lend tools. I learned my lesson (once and for all) when against my better judgement I loaned a power washer to a neighbor and it came back sounding like it worked but not actually working. That was a $350 mistake.

Now, on the rare occasion when I do lend a tool, it's accompanied by "The Talk", which involves a long look directly in the eyes and consent to 1: you break it you buy it and 2: I'm the one who decides whether you broke it. 

 

I use to loan a chain saw and it always came back broken. I ended up giving it to him and now borrow it when I need it

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lots of auto parts stores lend tools free

and there are tool rental stores

thrift stores and hock shops sell used tools

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Years ago I figured out the fact those in the rental business have put a lot of thought into their pricing. Rental tools also tend to be of the sort that are designed for durability even if that durability inhibits function. 

example: my DA sanders have lightweight discs that send virtually no vibration to my hands but fracture if dropped. A person who uses my tools MUST understand it is imperative to ALWAYS unplug the airline IMMEDIATELY      so it won’t get snagged by a passing ankle . 

I have a few tools I will allow a few selected others to use but virtually every one of those individuals is a self employed mechanic or dentist who fully comprehends not just the price of the tool  but the annoyance of having to repair or replace a damaged tool. 

I must admit, loaning my tools to those guys is almost always a positive experience. They often sharpen, lubricate, clean, or otherwise “pay “ for the convenience of using my stuff instead of driving home to get their own  or having to buy and store theirs. 

 

My club has a hoist, lifting straps, electrical outlets, water spigots and hoses, ladders, and wheel chocks. 

EVERYTHING else we have left in the work area for communal use has been destroyed. They don’t “not care.” They don’t know how to care. 

They have not had tools of their own or even been supervised and taught while they  used others’ tools. 

They don’t know the difference between  , “It didn’t work right” and “I used it to do something it couldn’t do.”

last: most sailors are bright folks. I offer access to my shop and tools to those who will enjoy following my directions but I have absolutely ZERO reservations about stopping them from hurting themselves, screwing up my tools, screwing up my shop, or or damaging their toys.

Every accountant, when reminded, remembers his teacher showing him or her how to hold a pencil. You not only have to show a person how to use a tool, you probably have to repeat yourself and be insistent. 

 

Ok. I lied ..,.. one more thing. 

It really isn’t nice to set oriole up to fail. Leaving tools out where incompetent folks can use them to mess up thrir boats isn’t actually a favor. 

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On 11/4/2018 at 11:00 AM, SloopJonB said:

Never lend tools or books - to anyone who doesn't live with you.

i am very judicious when I loan tools to my wife..   first you never know where they might end up and two, it's as bad as handing a hammer to a little kid..

when i go into harbor freight and they have a free tool coupon,  i grab the tool and drop it off at our little tack room..   screw drivers, hammers, tape measures,  whatever they give for free..    they never stick around, people grab stuff to work on their boat and never comes back..

i can't imagine power tools..    we have a power washer , that's it..  i can't count the times idiots using it away from it's usual station have let it vibrate and fall into the water...    we've gone through 6 power washers in about  10 years

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last club was well outfitted.

HD socket sets (BIG ones too), cable crimpers, grinders, prop removal tools, cutless bearing tools, sanders with shop vac with HEPA filters.

Outside the room was a big heavy workbench with power and vices bolted down.

 

But you had to ask the yard manager for any tool and he never forgets who he lent them to.

It all comes back because at the end of the day, he comes looking for you before he leaves.

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I grew up on a multi-generation farm.  Lesson learned.  I have my OWN tools stored in MY OWN shop, and don’t lend them to anyone.  Unless it’s an “extra” tool that I don’t need any more, anyway.  I seem to have the regressive gene in my family.  Hell, my brother won’t even put a tractor away when he’s done with it.  You have to spend an hour searching the orchard for it.  And it’s probably out of fuel and/or has a dead battery out there somewhere.  

Must. Stop. Rant...

Maybe just one more... Members of my family have an apparent belief that tools planted in the ground will grow to produce new tools.  Back in the day, when Bonneville Dam was built, the government condemned the lower fields, which were going to be underwater, and sent WPA crews in there to clear away all the trees and brush.  The WPA guys came rolling up in their truck one day and presented to my Great Grand-Dad a whole truck full of hand tools, pitchforks, rakes, shovels, axes, etc. that they had found laying around.  We didn’t have to go to a hardware store for 50 years. But the stockpile couldn’t survive my Dad.  

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1/4" rivet gun. I've lent mine out a hundred times, I've only needed myself twice.

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The only people I lend my tools to are my sons and my neighbor.  I trust them and know I’ll get them back in the same condition as when I lent them.

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On 11/3/2018 at 11:16 PM, LionessRacing said:

Just replaced some battery cables, which necessitated purchasing a cable cutter and lug crimper, suitable for working in situ. 

Dont expect to need them again, and don’t want to store, so donated to the club to start a special tool collection for occasional use. Will probably donate my rig tension gauge as well as the outboard motor mover I put in a few years back. 

What else would be worthy of stocking the club’s use once or twice in a decade closet ? 

 

Maybe a StrutPro cutless bearing extractor -- pricey for the maybe 1 or 2 times you'll ever wish you had it.  My club keeps a stash of basic, Harbor Freight-quality tools -- spray-painted red so they don't end up in someone's personal toolbox (in theory anyway...).   Knowing how people generally take care of tools, especially tools they don't own, I would be hesitant to spend the boat bucks on a strutpro, knowing that parts are going to go missing quickly.   Depending on the situation, maybe have a sign-out/sign-in procedure on certain equipment?

A good friend did replace my Loos gauge after ignoring my suggestion to use the leash I attached to keep it from jumping overboard.  Oops.

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