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onepointfivethumbs

Painting a racing dinghy

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So this spring as part of a greater refit I went to paint parts of the deck on my boat.

I went with Interlux Brightsides, the price wasn't too bad and application was supposed to be pretty easy.

I sanded the areas to be painted with 120 then 220, then wiped with acetone, let it sit overnight then painted.

I used a 4" foam roller from Lowe's and with the first pass I got a lot of bubbles, so subsequent passes was trying to tamp down those bubbles. I tried roll-and-tip with a foam brush but it seemed like that only pulled up paint that was already leveling.

I did three coats overall and four coats on the sidedecks where my butt was going to be, at roughly a coat a day to give good dry time between coats.

When everything was said and done my deck has a bit of an orange peel to it, I tried giving it a once-over with some 220 but it ended up taking off more paint than I wanted.

Over the season as the gunwales have bumped into docks and I've traveled with the boat more of the Brightsides has scratched off.

On the bottom, there are some areas where the old gelcoat (which has yellowed and become chalky) has broken through where the previous owner painted over with some other paint. There is also some bubbling between those paint layers.

This winter, I want to strip all the old paint off the bottom and put a new racing finish on. I'd also like a harder finish on the deck.

-What kind of paint should I use? Two-part seems like it would cure harder,  is new gelcoat an option? Am I just being retarded in how I applied the paint?

-How to reduce or eliminate the orange peel in the hardened paint? Different roller? Roll and tip with a little more nap? Should I use a primer over the gelcoat?

I'd like to keep it under $500 and avoid using a Pro if I can, I'm also trying to be somewhat conscious of weight.

 

IMG_2557[2093].JPG

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When I used Brightside for the deck of my Quarter Pounder I added 5% Penetrol, used a good foam brush and it leveled like glass. You need good foam brushes - they look less "foamy" than the cheap ones - denser. I don't use acetone for the final wipe - lacquer thinner is better. I usually wipe down with lacquer thinner and final wipe with alcohol. Also, Interlux has a proprietary solvent they recommend for the purpose.

 

You can wet sand and buff Brightside as well if the orange peel annoys you enough.

deck.jpg

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Ditto Sloop JonB. I repainted my mast in June with Brightside. Prepped surfaces carefully, primed a few bare spots with zinc chromate, primed the whole thing with the Interlux primer. After lots of sanding and fussing I used the Interlux solvent wipe and then rolled and tipped the paint thinned with the Interlux thinner. The paint goes on thin. You really do need the good foam brushes to tip. After three coats and a week of waiting I machine polished the mast with Finesse-It II Glaze and then Finesse-It II polish. It looks great up to about six inches, and even then I'm pretty sure I'm the only one who can see the flaws. I painted a Lightning the same way with good results. I also painted a C-Lark dinghy that way and got good results. The Lightning was my "learn-to-paint" boat. I thinned the paint too much, so it got four coats. I wish I hadn't sold it.

Lightning.jpg

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

When I used Brightside for the deck of my Quarter Pounder I added 5% Penetrol, used a good foam brush and it leveled like glass. You need good foam brushes - they look less "foamy" than the cheap ones - denser. I don't use acetone for the final wipe - lacquer thinner is better. I usually wipe down with lacquer thinner and final wipe with alcohol. Also, Interlux has a proprietary solvent they recommend for the purpose.

 

You can wet sand and buff Brightside as well if the orange peel annoys you enough.

deck.jpg

So would you say that Brightsides works well if you use the whole Interlux system-primer, pre-wipe, and paint? Did you wipe and/or wetsand between coats? 

+1 on the denser brushes, did you get them at normal hardware stores?

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1 hour ago, kevinjones16 said:

Ditto Sloop JonB. I repainted my mast in June with Brightside. Prepped surfaces carefully, primed a few bare spots with zinc chromate, primed the whole thing with the Interlux primer. After lots of sanding and fussing I used the Interlux solvent wipe and then rolled and tipped the paint thinned with the Interlux thinner. The paint goes on thin. You really do need the good foam brushes to tip. After three coats and a week of waiting I machine polished the mast with Finesse-It II Glaze and then Finesse-It II polish. It looks great up to about six inches, and even then I'm pretty sure I'm the only one who can see the flaws. I painted a Lightning the same way with good results. I also painted a C-Lark dinghy that way and got good results. The Lightning was my "learn-to-paint" boat. I thinned the paint too much, so it got four coats. I wish I hadn't sold it.

Lightning.jpg

beautiful. but.... an engine on a lightning? seems.... sacrilege 

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3 hours ago, onepointfivethumbs said:

So would you say that Brightsides works well if you use the whole Interlux system-primer, pre-wipe, and paint? Did you wipe and/or wetsand between coats? 

+1 on the denser brushes, did you get them at normal hardware stores?

I didn't need primer - the previous paint was well adhered so I just sanded it. I didn't use the Interlux solvent, just thought I'd mention it. I only put on one coat.

Proprietary solvents don't concern me for single part paints I don't feel it necessary to spend the price they charge and have never had a negative consequence. I would NOT do it with 2 part paints though - those are extremely fussy. It would be like mixing resin & hardener from two different epoxy brands.

IIRC I got my brushes from a tool store but it was a long time ago. The good ones all seem to be wood handles and very black, smooth, dense foam - you can tell them at a glance. The cheap ones seem to always have plastic handles.

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I used Quantum Paint, rolled it with a roller followed with a tipping badger brush, so it's a roll and tip job. Cost me 350.00 for the paint plus the misc supplies, so I don't think I spent more that 400.00 on it.
I rolled 4 coats on it, sanding in between coats, all and all its not a bad job to tackle, as long as the weather cooperates, as I was painting on the same outside spot what you see in the pic.
The 3rd coat got ruined by moisture as I made the mistake of rolling it around 5pm (got too confident). That forced me to sand and roll another coat of paint.

This is the paint.
http://quantumpaint.com/

I keep the boat in Florida, so far the paint its holding up great.HHxxtAh.jpg

 

oSelU19.jpg

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That's outstanding. I've seen lots of spray jobs that weren't nearly that good.

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How long is the Brightsides actually lasting in use?   It looks great following application, but does it stay that way?  How soon before repainting is necessary?

 

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Mine still looked pretty good 5 years later when I sold the boat.

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I sprayed a Prindle 19 cat, back in the early 90's with the two part  Interlux Brightside, which I don't think they sell anymore,  The paint held up for the 4+ years that I had the boat. It did develop some peeling on top of the deck on a couple of spots. The application was done according to the manufactures instructions, including the Interlux primer.

Not sure why it started to peel on a few spots, might have been something I did during prep. The topsides held up just fine, and they look very good when I sold the boat. I was happy with the results at the time.

I researched the paint options, prior to painting this boat. Quite a few boat yards have been using the Quantum paint for the past 5 years and swear by it. It is a very strange paint, once mixed it is the consistency of milk... you apply it very, very, very thin. I used 1/2 quart for one coat on the entire boat. It dries very hard, but you can sand it to correct issues. 

The application required no priming, only degreasing and sanding the hull with 220 grit. 

I am very happy with results, the paint has been on the boat for about 9 months now, and it looks great.

BTW, I am not affiliated or have any financial interest in the Quantum paint company, just a regular Joe customer.

 

 

 

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^^^  Looks good!  Also seems like you spent a lot less than Perfection or Awlgrip would have cost.

I would be willing to try it.  Nice to support a South Carolina startup too.

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I used Brightside on the kids el toro, and after 2 years looked like hell. It just couldn’t take abrasion.

i rolled/tipped 2-part perfection a few weeks back. Fussy, but looks great! 

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Quantum (“flows like milk”) sounds like a newer brand of two-part LP paint like Perfection and Awlgrip.

I love Perfection and have painted (rolled) an aluminum mast, wooden spreaders, part of a deck, and a transom with it over the past few years. These two-part paints are far superior to one-part Brightside - much harder and more durable. They are a bit more hassle to apply, but in my experience the prep is so much more work than the actual painting that it’s almost a no-brainer to spend the 15% extra time and a bit more money on the two-part.

The OP’s description of his Brightside finish sounds like a textbook case of not-enough-thinner added to the paint before applying. And the durability of the result also sounds like textbook one-part paint. It does not do well in contested elections, ie boat vs. piling, boat vs. fender, boat vs. mooring buoy.

I’m not a huge fan of foam rollers; the adhesive holding the foam to the roller is always iffy and tends to let go at exactly the worst time - even on branded West System rollers, which you’d think are as resistant to solvents as possible.

Gouvernail out me into Wooster 3/16" nap "all paint" R206-4 Super Doo-Z rollers from Amazon, and now that’s all I use except for a disposable little chip brush for nooks and crannies (monitoring departing bristles very carefully). My rule of thumb is that I f the finish doesn’t level like glass five minutes after application, add more thinner.

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On 11/12/2018 at 8:20 PM, View from the back said:

The very first post.....  who's Finn is that?

Good eye ;)

It's mine...although you're on the wrong coast for us to know each other? 

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