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CG ends search, 29' sailboat missing, east coast

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This didn't turn out well for the 82-year old solo sailor who departed Virginia Beach for Florida:

https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/coast-guard-suspends-search-for-82-year-old-sailor

From the article and search-plot, it seems the Coast Guard searched "everywhere", from his intended route all the way to where the gulf stream and prevailing winds might have carried him.

The CG comments about the importance of a fixed VHF and an EPIRB, make it sound as this gentleman may have not have had them.

 

Condolences to his family.  Does this beat a nursing home at the end?  I'm never sure if that's the right thing to say, but did anyway.

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it should be illegal for guys in their 80s to buy 2nd hand boats out of someone's backyard

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11 minutes ago, Parma said:

it should be illegal for guys in their 80s to buy 2nd hand boats out of someone's backyard

Why?

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Tell us that when you are 82

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19 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Tell us that when you are 82

If those are my two choices, I won't take 5 seconds to pick one that doesn't involve rotting in place.

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Tell us that when you are 82

there isn't a person alive who thinks i'm gonna see 82. i figure 72 is about my number. 

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3 minutes ago, Editor said:

there isn't a person alive who thinks i'm gonna see 82. i figure 72 is about my number. 

I picked 34 for some reason, obviously much younger. I just doubled it, see if you can make 144.

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mighty strong , that will to live  ........................

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While sailing off into the drink may be a guys' way to check out, it's hard on the family especially if they are the sort who find closure in a wake and funeral etc, and exposes the Coasties to some additional operational risks to go look for him. 

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13 minutes ago, ROADKILL666 said:

I HOPE I CAN STILL DO THAT AT THAT AGE.THATS THE WAY I WANT TO GO OUT. BEATS TUBES AND SHIT

Have you considered disabling your caps lock? Because if you don't, you're going on my ignore list. I don't come here to have people yell at me.

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27 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Is that better Ish?

Well, I can still read it, but it's marginal. A bit louder would be OK.

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

Have you considered disabling your caps lock? Because if you don't, you're going on my ignore list. I don't come here to have people yell at me.

Can't you tell he's hard of hearing?

- Stumbling

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6 minutes ago, stumblingthunder said:

Can't you tell he's hard of hearing?

- Stumbling

Well shit, I'm hard of thinking and I'm smart enough to turn caps off.

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Viking funeral?

 

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On 11/9/2018 at 1:21 PM, NaptimeAgain said:

While sailing off into the drink may be a guys' way to check out, it's hard on the family especially if they are the sort who find closure in a wake and funeral etc, and exposes the Coasties to some additional operational risks to go look for him. 

True on the CG having to take risks,   Medicare might have spent just as much for a couple years of chemo, radiation, surgery and the inevitable complications.   Why not take risks when you are old, there is less downside.   Dealing with the long slide isn’t easy on family either.   I won’t judge.

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3 hours ago, Lark said:

True on the CG having to take risks,   Medicare might have spent just as much for a couple years of chemo, radiation, surgery and the inevitable complications.   Why not take risks when you are old, there is less downside.   Dealing with the long slide isn’t easy on family either.   I won’t judge.

Hopefully it came quick like a jibe to the head. We waste a ton of money and effort on largely futile medical attempts to squeeze out another day.  

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On 11/8/2018 at 7:58 PM, Parma said:

it should be illegal for guys in their 80s to buy 2nd hand boats out of someone's backyard

Nope

Dreams have no age limit. 

But Mother Nature is a tough adversary at that age

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I've spent far too much time in recent years watching relatives age out.  One common thing is that elderly folks can become metabolically fragile. Such that an unusual physical effort, or a minor infection, maybe a bit of dehydration, sends a kidney out of whack and presto! instant dementia.  Meals don't get eaten, meds don't get taken, and things spiral from there.  It's possible to recover from, but it seems to take a long time and hospitalization.  I imagine that if it happened alone at sea, that would pretty much be the end.  

On the other hand, people who get out and sail and such are probably less likely to get into a metabolically fragile state in the first place.  

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17 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Nope

Dreams have no age limit. 

But Mother Nature is a tough adversary at that age

not suggesting that an 80+ yr old should not be allowed to buy a boat, just not a backyard boat

backyard boats fall apart fast and are there for a reason, none of them good.

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No way...

I'm going to live to 100 and completely revert back to the simple joys of being a kid.

I will rediscover the awesomeness of things like a slinky, or a coloring book.

 

And then I'm driving my sports car to the marina and TAKE ISH's BOAT OUT FOR A SAIL!

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Just spent today with my Mom. 

I love her more than myself.

Shes so bad I’d take the boat, backyard special more than any other!:blink:

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coincidentally, one of the NARC boats that left from Newport saw what they described as a 32'er in the GS, probably Tuesday or Wed the 30th or 31st. They were able to get the name and reported it to at least Bermuda Radio but I don't know much more about it than that.

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On 11/12/2018 at 7:11 AM, ryley said:

coincidentally, one of the NARC boats that left from Newport saw what they described as a 32'er in the GS, probably Tuesday or Wed the 30th or 31st. They were able to get the name and reported it to at least Bermuda Radio but I don't know much more about it than that.

you mean like an obviously abandoned boat or a boat with flapping sails drifting aimlessly?

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13 hours ago, Parma said:

you mean like an obviously abandoned boat or a boat with flapping sails drifting aimlessly?

what I was told was that the NARC boat came across a boat that had its main down and the jib tattered but up. they circled it a number of times trying to raise anyone on board with horns and radio, but the sea state was too steep to attempt a boarding. They got the name (not reported during the retelling) and reported the name and position to Bermuda Radio. 

When I saw the story here, I contacted CG Mid-Atlantic with that much detail and suggested they contacted BR for any further information relayed by the NARC vessel.

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On 11/8/2018 at 7:58 PM, Parma said:

it should be illegal for guys in their 80s to buy 2nd hand boats out of someone's backyard

 

On 11/9/2018 at 1:21 PM, NaptimeAgain said:

While sailing off into the drink may be a guys' way to check out, it's hard on the family especially if they are the sort who find closure in a wake and funeral etc, and exposes the Coasties to some additional operational risks to go look for him. 

First, we criticize people who set out and punch the EPIRB button when they need help. Next, we criticize people who set out and DON'T ask for help. This guy didn't ask for rescue, people on shore asked the CG to go look for him.

What's next, tell everyone to just stay at home and die on the sofa so we can eliminate the need for rescue services?

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11 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 

First, we criticize people who set out and punch the EPIRB button when they need help. Next, we criticize people who set out and DON'T ask for help. This guy didn't ask for rescue, people on shore asked the CG to go look for him.

What's next, tell everyone to just stay at home and die on the sofa so we can eliminate the need for rescue services?

Ajax, not saying he should not have gone.  Just saying that while it may be a romantic epic end to just disappear at sea, with Norse maidens on a flaming Viking ship etc. it seems to have caused considerable distress to the family in this case because of the uncertainty.  And I don't think that most of us old goats really want to impose that kind of anxiety and pain on our loved ones. That said, a lingering slide into health care hell is no picnic for anyone either.  Personally I hope to die of something that gives me just enough time to say the parting "I luv u" to those that I love.  Including travel time that's probably a few days.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Ajax, not saying he should not have gone.  Just saying that while it may be a romantic epic end to just disappear at sea, with Norse maidens on a flaming Viking ship etc. it seems to have caused considerable distress to the family in this case because of the uncertainty.  And I don't think that most of us old goats really want to impose that kind of anxiety and pain on our loved ones. That said, a lingering slide into health care hell is no picnic for anyone either.  Personally I hope to die of something that gives me just enough time to say the parting "I luv u" to those that I love.  Including travel time that's probably a few days.

 

 

Your earlier post seemed to indicate dissatisfaction with the level of resources expended looking for this fellow who did not ask to be looked for. That's mainly what I was addressing. Now we're on the topic of stresses to the family, so let's discuss that:

As you say, the family is going to endure stress one way or the other- Whether you fade away from cancer in hospice or whether you disappear abruptly at sea, the family is going to be distressed. The best one can do, is ensure that proper preparations are made in terms of wills, insurance policies, written final instructions and most importantly, sitting down with the family and explaining the risks and possible negative outcomes to prepare them.

My children are grown and my parents are older. I continually update my will and insurance policies to ensure that my loved ones are well provided for in the event that I, as a walking, talking, money generating machine are suddenly removed from their lives. That's a hell of a lot more effort and responsibility than the guy who goes "splat!" on his Harley-Davidson with only a year's salary of life insurance and a wife and two small children.

My family worried and disagreed when I chose to live aboard. They disagreed when I set off on a piddly little solo trip around the Delmarva peninsula.  That's just tough shit. I have to live my life for me, not live it according to the imagined fears of others, even if they are my family. 

We place far too much value these days on the quantity of life and not nearly enough on the *quality* of life. If my family really loves me, they will want me to have the best quality of life, not just an empty, vast quantity.

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There's something to be said for dying with your boots on.  Something more to be said for the lack of things to do directly contributing to your death, anyway.  Might as well kick it doing what you love.  My grandfather is 91, only now starting to show signs of getting close to the grave and he's had Alzheimer's bad for the last 6-8 years.  I think I'd rather go out blasting over waves on the high seas, even if it's just to save the family the anguish of watching me slowly waste away.  It's put a lot of stress on my grandmother to the point where she had some sort of minor stroke that the doctors think is probably from stress and exhaustion.  Guessing she will probably go shortly after he does.... which brings us back to lack of things to do contributing to your demise.

Life is funny.

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