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Considering buying '82 J 30

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I am considering buying 1982 J 30. Going to see her on Sunday. Just in time for the 2019 J30 nationals in Annapolis. Anything in particular I should look for, ask about, etc.? 

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Great boats for multiple applications, but loads of stuff to look for and think about. J30.org (forum) is your best source. If you are not already reading there you should be tonight.  Take  time to find the right one during your process, and focus on the fundamentals, not the bells and whistles. I hope you have a great experience. Good group group of folks in the class.

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which boat?

 

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I had a 1980 J30 and really enjoyed the boat. It is a good multi purpose boat. While there are better boats for racing and cruising, the J30 is a very good compromise. I agree with Rico's comments. Look at the hull, deck, rudder and mast. If those are good then everything else after that is a bonus. Good luck

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Thanks for all of the replies. I will be looking at Cannonball on Sunday. I walked around Blue Streak a couple of weeks ago(outside only). It seems as if she was hit. There was a  3 square foot area on her starboard side amidship full of cracks. 

I have been looking at the J30 website, looked through the rules and specifications, and some of the forums.

Plans are to do a lot of racing, and some cruising with the Sailing Club of the Chesapeake.Plus I hope to do the Bermuda 1-2 in 2021. 

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It's been some time ago but in my experience the J30 is a fantastic heavy air boat and just meh in light air.  Just mentioning that because of the area you are in. 

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35 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

It's been some time ago but in my experience the J30 is a fantastic heavy air boat and just meh in light air.  Just mentioning that because of the area you are in. 

there's also a pretty good 1D fleet here so the light air issue really isn't one unless you race PHRF. they've got 1D on Wed nights, Fri nights and most weekend regattas. although it's not impossible, it'll take some work to get a 30 equipped, ready and approved for a 1-2. Wouldn't be my first choice of boat for that, but there are worse!! Good Luck.

 

Which Cannonball? there were a couple, Not sure the original was a 1D boat anymore. Balanced Rudder or something.. I could be wrong about that though.

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24 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

Which Cannonball? there were a couple, Not sure the original was a 1D boat anymore. Balanced Rudder or something.. I could be wrong about that though.

Looking at the J/30 Fleet list hull 386 would be the correct build date.

Every J/30 built will have wet core on deck and hull if it hasn't already been taken care of.  I recored my old boat (hull 348) and it was solid afterwards.  The J/30 is a good racer/cruiser with an active OD class.  If you're willing to do some fix up work, you will appreciate the boat and the racing/cruising.

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I looked at the J/30 fleet list, probably is 386 although ad says 387. Picture linked to 386 has same paint as boat in ad. Also the person selling Cannonball is named Robert, not Doug.

I must agree that the J/30  is not perfect for the Bermuda 1-2, I would rather have a little more than 7000 lbs.

If one is not willing to work on his boat (or can afford to get someone else to do it) they better sell it .... soon.

Thanks again all.

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Hmmm - I just went to the admin panel on the J/30 database.  The sail number is 387 but the hull ID is TSP8C277M81L which really makes this hull number 277 if that is the correct Hull ID.  The build code shows this as a 1981 model year.  The previous owner sold it and the class database was never updated.  He bought hull #90 and got second place in the 2016 NAs.

I know a guy who single handed his J/30 from Newport to Bermuda in 2008 when I did it on a Swan.  I had a more comfortable ride :D.

ps - if you want some history on the boat email the previous owner who now owns hull 90 on the class database.

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Well I looked at Cannonball Sunday. It seemed about average for a 7 grand boat. Needed paint on deck and topsides. Hasn't had any varnish applied in years, some rotten plywood. The wife didn't like the amount of headroom. But what really got me was the guy selling her. There was some faded sticker in the front of the cockpit that said something about "King". He said that the king of Iran owned this boat. Uh, what would a King want with a 30 foot sailboat? Sail around his swimming pool? Then he said there were 2 J 30 in the 1979 Fastnet that did fine. Can't find my copy of "Force 10 at Fastnet" but I find the whole story rather fantastic.

Anyway, going to look at a S2 9.2 on Saturday.

Thanks again all.

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He's speaking the truth about the Fastnet storm.  Hull 10 was in the race and dropped out after the main blow, hull 29 was singlehanding across the Atlantic and got caught up in the blow.  Pretty seaworthy boat.  

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Just my random 2 cents worth what you paid-lol.

As Lex mentions the boat survived the Fastnet to my knowledge.  That said and not trying to dis 30 owners here but I did the Chicago Mac race on my J35 and it was the one where two people died.  Afterwards there was a safety inquiry into the incident and one of the findings/recommendation was that there should be a cut off number on the Stability Index. From memory that was implemented the following year and the J30 fell outside that index/was not Mac race legal.  You mention going offshore and I think in general the J30 is a fine boat but perhaps not the best choice for some of the things you want to do.  I would pass on the S-2 9.2 but would give serious consideration the the S-2 9.1.  Although similar size and from the same builder, these boats are worlds apart from a design perspective, the 9.1 being the more racing oriented boat.  Bear in mind too that there were a few 9.1 "Special Editions" that had interiors that were different from the standard 9.1 Not sure where it falls on the Stability Index scale, US sailing should have this info if sistership has ORR certificate.

Good luck, boat shopping is the funnest and least costly part!

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Here is the link to the Fastnet story from the J/30 website.  Regarding the stability cutoff for the Mac race.  I was J/30 Class president when this happened.  Rod Johnstone tried unsuccessfully to get the decision reversed.  The problem is the stability calculations don't take into account the total volume of the curved coach roof.  

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I remember seeing an ad for an S2 9.1 in Connecticut and thought about seeing it, but I think it was sold. This S2 9.2, you are right, it is not what I want.   So this is what I do want: I have wanted to do the Bermuda 1-2 for 10 years now. 15 grand is about the limit of my initial investment with another 15 grand before the June 5, 2021 start (which means 30 grand). I want a sailboat 28-34 feet, offshore capable, tiller, not shoal draft, sloop or cutter. I was just recommended an Pearson 33. What do you all think.

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On 11/23/2018 at 10:07 AM, WHK said:

Hmmm - I just went to the admin panel on the J/30 database.  The sail number is 387 but the hull ID is TSP8C277M81L which really makes this hull number 277 if that is the correct Hull ID.  The build code shows this as a 1981 model year.

I recall measuring the Cannonball currently for sale before a championship and was surprised to see that hull ID 386 (the hull ID listed in the class database) didn't match the sail number 387. Pretty sure I verified this with the title/registration, but after searching both my computer and paper files I cannot verify this. (TSP8C277M81L is not consistent with any hull ID format used on a J/30 by Tillotson-Pearson Inc). Too bad we didn't get you to read the Hull ID while you were there.  BTW that Cannonball was the winner of the 1993 J/30 North Americans in Annapolis and was always competitive. 

That said I have no idea what the current condition of that boat is. As noted a family member of the long-time owner of Cannonball formed a new partnership to purchase hull 90, naming it Cannonball 2.0. Though an older hull number, 90 my understanding was that it was in better condition having been upgraded by two previous owners, who won three class championships between 1998 and 2011.

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Having done several offshore deliveries in our J/30, if the boat is properly prepared it can handle it if you can. A search through J30.org shows boats in the Bermuda 1-2, Pac Cup to Hawaii and Atlantic crossing by Delirious a couple years back.  My time for that is past, but the one-design racing in Annapolis has recently shown a resurgence as the price of boats has become incredibly cheap though sails are another story. Nothing better in my opinion than racing one-design, unless you want to team or match race one-designs.

 

 

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A couple good buys in the SA Classifieds:

https://sailinganarchy.com/classifieds/show-ad/?id=4185

https://sailinganarchy.com/classifieds/show-ad/?id=3889

I know a Tartan Ten has done the Bermuda 1-2 before. 

A point worth considering if you're looking to shorthand offshore is that a stock J/30 does not have a balanced rudder. They're famous for having excessive weather helm when the breeze gets piped up. To be able to handle this you're going to need a beefy autopilot and lots of power storage/generation abilities. 

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15 hours ago, BeBop said:

... (TSP8C277M81L is not consistent with any hull ID format used on a J/30 by Tillotson-Pearson Inc).

I noticed that.  My guess is when someone read the stamped number with poor condition on the digits the 30 got read as 8C - entirely possible.  All the rest is consistent.

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A few more random thoughts.  You might assign a percentage of likely usage to help guide the process.  For example, if 90% of your racing would be done locally and there is a strong OD presence there, it can in many ways be a no brainer to pick the J30.  It is a win two ways, first you have built in competition which is always fun in the sense that it is not a horses for courses type of deal where one boat might be favored for certain conditions (light air, heavy air, etc). Second if it is a good group you have people familiar with the boat and how to make it go and also willing to share that info with you.

With regard to the Bermuda, I don't claim specific knowledge, but do bear in mind that any distance race of that stature has safety standards and that those standards may be a moving target.  Using the Chicago to Mac race for example in the safety regs they many time use the phrase "recommended" with regard to equipment and at others "required".  As safety progresses, it is not unusual for something that was on last years "recommended" list to now be on the required list.  Just food for thought, not saying increasing safety standards is a bad thing.

With regard to the Pearson 33 it is certainly a well built boat.  Not sure what design/vintage you are referring to, one of the early ones or the mid 80s boats that had fin keel/centerboard options.  That said, when I think of using a boat for racing, the Pearson doesn't jump out as first choice.  In any boat though care is king.  Many owners treat boats as consumables deferring maintenance, avoiding big ticket things needed to maintain, etc.  The trick is to find the rare owner who has the foresight to both care for the boat and the means to spend money addressing long term needs rather than spending small amounts on what are largely superficial things.

Although out of your stated range I think a J33 would fit the bill and asking price is not always reflective of what things actually sell for.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1988/j-boats-j33-3132135/

Perhaps another thought would be a late generation maxi MORC 30.  Although fairly rare, they do occasionally come up for sale in your neck of the woods.  I know Tin Man is one example that has raced to Bermuda and would be closer to your price range.  Another, which has had various names, I think Motion was in that range and either just sold recently or is still for sale, locals can chime in on that one.


 

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hmmmmmm ...where's the Cone of Silence?

 

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S2 9.1 sounds like the right boat for you. I'm a J Boat guy but the 9.1 is better in every way than J/30 - performance, interior comfort, plus they seem to have held up better than J/30's over the years. They may have some mast step issues, but all in all much less work than a J/30 to get race ready. Plenty of good 9.1's for sale at the moment so its a buyers market.

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I own #24 [Top Tick] which we have had for 5 years now.

First:  The J/30 is a GREAT BOAT.  Yes, as stated above, not great in light air but in anything mid to heavy, they are fabulous.

Like any balsa cored boat from that era, you have a project on your hands and will to the day you sell it.  The previous owner of our boat did a great deal of core work on the deck but we still had to do an area in the cockpit this fall when she came out of the water.  It just goes with the territory.

The good news is, if you pay close attention and take really good care of the boat they will last well beyond their [your] years and they are a joy to sail.

My only complaint si the design of the cockpit.  A little small for racing with a full crew.

We got a really well cared for boat 5 years ago and have invested more in her every year.  If you’d like more more detailed info, PM me and I’d be happy to share our experiences.

A shot of us from this past summer racing on a Wednesday taken by our buddy Tim.

 

EEC5577C-269E-44E6-AA78-C44E11946DF4.jpeg

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On 11/29/2018 at 4:00 PM, arcpix said:

I own #24 [Top Tick] which we have had for 5 years now.

First:  The J/30 is a GREAT BOAT.  Yes, as stated above, not great in light air but in anything mid to heavy, they are fabulous.

Like any balsa cored boat from that era, you have a project on your hands and will to the day you sell it.  The previous owner of our boat did a great deal of core work on the deck but we still had to do an area in the cockpit this fall when she came out of the water.  It just goes with the territory.

The good news is, if you pay close attention and take really good care of the boat they will last well beyond their [your] years and they are a joy to sail.

My only complaint si the design of the cockpit.  A little small for racing with a full crew.

We got a really well cared for boat 5 years ago and have invested more in her every year.  If you’d like more more detailed info, PM me and I’d be happy to share our experiences.

A shot of us from this past summer racing on a Wednesday taken by our buddy Tim.

 

EEC5577C-269E-44E6-AA78-C44E11946DF4.jpeg

As a former S2 9.1 owner, let me reinforce what arcpix said.  "Like any balsa cored boat of that era..."  The S2 9.1 needs just as much core replacement (in general) as a J-30.  Mine had a good sized chunk of hull done just before I bought it, and I did the foredeck, sidedecks and cabintop during the 5 years I owned, leaving only the cockpit to be done for the guy that bought it after me.  They also have other issues as mentioned earlier up thread...mast step, mast partner in particular.  They are great boats, and I would recommend one, but I think the J-30 is also a great boat and would recommend one of those as well.  

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If you are also considering racing weekdays in Annapolis, the j30 is a great low price option.  Towards the end of 2018 Wednesday nights, there were more J30s than J105s.  Heck we even have an OD fleet for frostbites this year.  

I bought a 30 3 years ago and have enjoyed the boat and the fleet.  She’s slow in light air with a fairly dead helm downwind, but who cares if racing OD.  I’d rather have a slow boat with a genoa, than race around 90% of the time in Annapolis underpowered with a blade.  The 4 sail OD race inventory is great compared to what you would need to race other 30’ Phrf boats and the .75 oz kite will last a good bit of time. 

Our boat is in the water at EYC (hull 526) and will be racing the second frostbite series.  If you want to go for a sail, feel free to message me.  I’m sure any of the 30s racing would have you aboard if you are interested in joining the class and have questions about the boat.  

If you are seriously considering buying a boat of this vintage, spend the money for a moisture meter so you know what you are getting into.   Especially check the transom, chain plate areas, anchor locker, Genoa car and winches, the hull under the ice chest, and around the sliding hatch and sea hood and traveler.  

 

 

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did you buy a boat yet?   I've got an 84 S2 9.1 for sale

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