Uli Kunkel

Need help day dreaming about a boat....

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I dream of leaving it all behind and going cruising for a few years with my wife and kids. Would go in 3 years, when the kids would be 6 and 9 at the time. I don't have any kind of crazy budget, would like to stay under 75k for the boat. What type of boat would you suggest that would primarily be safe, but also capable of making  passages in decent time. How big is the right size? 99.9% chance this will never leave the browsing yachtworld and dreaming phase, but my day dream needs specifics....

 

Thanks

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If you need help daydreaming I'd say you have a long road ahead.

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Focused daydreaming. :D

Yep, you do need help.

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Why not a Cal 39?  There's a movie you could take your family to see. Robert Redford is in it.

You could also try reading any or all of the threads about "what boat to choose?" here or on other sites. 

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I had a nice older Passport 40 when I intended to take my family (two daughters 10 years apart). That would be a good start and they can probably be had for that kind of budget if you look hard and are will to do some work on it. 

Image result for passport 40 sailboat

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Daydreaming?!?!?!  I'm an expert, I've been doing that all my life!

Lesseee here...

Family.  Young.

Budget.  Low.

Dream.  Good.

You need to find a Tiki 38 Wharram (used, but watch out for (home)build deficiencies and plywood rot..)

Carries a dinghy.

Separate quarters for the kiddies.

Available probably within your budget.

Outboard powered.  Easily replaced.

Easy-ish to maintain.  (wood, paint, rope....)

Not too big.  Not too small.

Might be a bit tougher sell to the Admiral.  (Yup, she'll get a title...)

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Some 25 years ago a neighbor started a 10 year circumnavigation on a 1979 Cal 39 with 2 kids about the age of yours.  They are great kids, successful adults now.

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Uli,  I’m with you.  Daughter is in college, so in less than 4 years that shit storm will be over....

id love to do the same thing.  Wife would not be really interested so I’d be likely solo.

i was thinking of a 4ksb like a Cabo rico 38. Or a Pearson 40.  Both of which I could transit the icw if I had to.  Both of which would get me into shallow spots up and down the east coast and Into the tropical waters.    The Cabo with it full keel offers nice prop and rudder protection from grounding or foreign object damage, the Pearson no so much.   But spent time on both boats when I was younger, so there is some heartstrings tugging for those particular boats.  

Sigh......

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6 hours ago, Veeger said:

Daydreaming?!?!?!  I'm an expert, I've been doing that all my life!

Lesseee here...

Family.  Young.

Budget.  Low.

Dream.  Good.

You need to find a Tiki 38 Wharram (used, but watch out for (home)build deficiencies and plywood rot..)

Carries a dinghy.

Separate quarters for the kiddies.

Available probably within your budget.

Outboard powered.  Easily replaced.

Easy-ish to maintain.  (wood, paint, rope....)

Not too big.  Not too small.

Might be a bit tougher sell to the Admiral.  (Yup, she'll get a title...)

Ticks all the boxes...  What is the normal cruising speed??

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1 hour ago, shaggy said:

Ticks all the boxes...  What is the normal cruising speed??

It won't set your hair on fire....

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21 hours ago, Uli Kunkel said:

I dream of leaving it all behind and going cruising for a few years with my wife and kids. Would go in 3 years, when the kids would be 6 and 9 at the time. I don't have any kind of crazy budget, would like to stay under 75k for the boat. What type of boat would you suggest that would primarily be safe, but also capable of making  passages in decent time. How big is the right size? 99.9% chance this will never leave the browsing yachtworld and dreaming phase, but my day dream needs specifics....

 

Thanks

Preparing to go cruising is a lot of work. For some, it's a lifetime endeavor. You didn't say, but I'm going to guess this would not be your first boat and that you already know a bit about electricity, engines, radio, etc etc.

But just the step of buying the boat and getting it underway takes more work than you'd think (if you haven't done it). A lot of boats are advertised as "turn-key" but there is no such thing unless you like surprises.

If you have $75k in hand, I'd suggest spending $50k~$60k to buy the boat and have a nice wad to blow on equipment, and maybe even a lavish first couple of months cruising. Your partner will appreciate visiting nice places and going out to dinner. If you make it to the remote anchorages, there's no place to spend money anyway.

Boat shopping? Yeah I love window shopping with other peoples money, but the boat(s) I love are generally not boats favored by the "serious cruiser" community. Growing up racing small-ish sailboats, to me the fun of sailing is a big part of it, so I don't want a brick barnhouse of a boat. And as Marcjsmith mentioned, draft is an issue. Shallow draft allows you to run aground in much more interesting (and much less crowded, and much safer) places. In the price range $50~$60k there are thousands of good choices of many types. Steel full-keel ketches (fuck it, why not a SCHOONER!!!), cruisified ex-racers, center cockpit liveaboards, etc etc. YOu'll have to look around.... maybe even do some leg work and go look..... narrow it down a bit before anybody can give real helpful advice.

Or if it's just daydreaming, let it all hang out. Cheapest thrills and all that.

FB- Doug

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7 hours ago, HuronBouy said:

How about this?? 

Probably needs some love 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1985/pearson-422-center-cockpit-3021857/

 

She's been on the hard for 3 seasons and has some issues 
• Water stains on teak panels around the portlights
• Aft cabin has some water leaks and resultant water stains on panels, flooring and headliner
• sails and rigging are at least 10 years old 

 

danger-will-robinson-36840004.png

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13 hours ago, Minnesail said:

She's been on the hard for 3 seasons and has some issues 
• Water stains on teak panels around the portlights
• Aft cabin has some water leaks and resultant water stains on panels, flooring and headliner
• sails and rigging are at least 10 years old 

 

danger-will-robinson-36840004.png

I suspected it was a project at that price. But my buddy has one in great shape (not for sale) and they do sail well and are very comfortable. 

Oh well 

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On 11/28/2018 at 10:14 AM, Rasputin22 said:

I had a nice older Passport 40 when I intended to take my family (two daughters 10 years apart). That would be a good start and they can probably be had for that kind of budget if you look hard and are will to do some work on it. 

Image result for passport 40 sailboat

 

That looks awesome. 

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Keeping it to just daydreaming has its advantages! While you're at it, daydreaming up some sort of ongoing income for a few years of cruising would be a good idea too. The advice to save a sizable chunk of your boat fund for refitting is spot on. It can be done (and I've seen it) on a pretty meagre budget, but it's hard not to make a lot of compromises trying to do everything on the cheap (no fridge, cranky/clapped out motor, raggedy sails, sketchy ground tackle and rigging, crappy/intermittently working/non-functioning or existent electronics, not to mention cosmetics). I think cruising itself has changed quite a bit over the past twenty years... marina, boatyard, and mechanic labor rates have skyrocketed. Many formerly sleepy, laid back and relatively inexpensive ports have moved towards more formalized and expensive policies and procedures.

So I reread the above and realize that I'm really getting to be full of shit. When I first sailed into the Caribbean in the 70's there were a handful of cranky old men sailing up and down the chain in beautiful old wood yachts, who did little else but sit around in bars, get drunk and bitch about how everything had gone to hell and wasn't like it used to be. I laughed at them and headed down island. Fuck it. listen to Lyle Lovett sing "If I Had A Boat" and dream your dream.  'Never know, it might come true.

Virgin Gorda 2007.jpg

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4 hours ago, sugarbird said:

The advice to save a sizable chunk of your boat fund for refitting is spot on. It can be done (and I've seen it) on a pretty meagre budget, but it's hard not to make a lot of compromises trying to do everything on the cheap (no fridge, cranky/clapped out motor, raggedy sails, sketchy ground tackle and rigging, crappy/intermittently working/non-functioning or existent electronics, not to mention cosmetics). 

Good reminder of how relatively cheap and simple it can be, if you’re willing and able:

 

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8 hours ago, sugarbird said:

When I first sailed into the Caribbean in the 70's there were a handful of cranky old men sailing up and down the chain in beautiful old wood yachts, who did little else but sit around in bars, get drunk and bitch about how everything had gone to hell and wasn't like it used to be.

"You shoulda been here last week / month / year."

It was ever thus.

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On 11/30/2018 at 2:53 AM, HuronBouy said:

How about this?? 

Probably needs some love 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1985/pearson-422-center-cockpit-3021857/

 

 

On 11/30/2018 at 10:31 AM, Minnesail said:

She's been on the hard for 3 seasons and has some issues 
• Water stains on teak panels around the portlights
• Aft cabin has some water leaks and resultant water stains on panels, flooring and headliner
• sails and rigging are at least 10 years old 

 

danger-will-robinson-36840004.png

Paging Mads to the Pretty Dang Spiffy courtesy phone.

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37 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

"You shoulda been here last week / month / year."

It was ever thus.

Actually, modern day Greece doesn’t hold a candle to Ancient Greece.  You shoulda been there then:  Aristotle, Thucydides, Plato, Aristophanes, etc., you know, all them big players were there then, but nowadays not so much :-). The place has really changed.

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Actually, modern day Greece doesn’t hold a candle to Ancient Greece.  You shoulda been there then:  Aristotle, Thucydides, Plato, Aristophanes, etc., you know, all them big players were there then, but nowadays not so much :-). The place has really changed.

The whole place is going to shit, it was much better when the highest form of life was a trilobite.

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On 11/29/2018 at 3:46 AM, Uli Kunkel said:

I dream of leaving it all behind and going cruising for a few years with my wife and kids. Would go in 3 years, when the kids would be 6 and 9 at the time.

Perfect time. Mine were 6 and 10.

Buy as big a modern plastic boat as you can afford. Spend more time doing fun stuff, less chasing rust, or varnishing. Enjoy easy sailing. Kids that age are happy to wash once a week and eat whatever there is. 250 litres of water would last us 10 days easy. Flat bread or biscuits keeps for ages.

Coastal cruise somewhere warm, 200 ish mile hops at the most. That can get you to some out of the way locations. Spend the rest of the time doing fun shit with the kids. They will love it, and if you choose a simple plastic boat, you will too.

Something like a Sun Odyssey 37 etc. We did  a trial on a dehler 34, then bought a small 37 fter and it was perfect for us.

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On 12/3/2018 at 2:30 AM, Se7en said:

Perfect time. Mine were 6 and 10.

Buy as big a modern plastic boat as you can afford. Spend more time doing fun stuff, less chasing rust, or varnishing. Enjoy easy sailing. Kids that age are happy to wash once a week and eat whatever there is. 250 litres of water would last us 10 days easy. Flat bread or biscuits keeps for ages.

Coastal cruise somewhere warm, 200 ish mile hops at the most. That can get you to some out of the way locations. Spend the rest of the time doing fun shit with the kids. They will love it, and if you choose a simple plastic boat, you will too.

Something like a Sun Odyssey 37 etc. We did  a trial on a dehler 34, then bought a small 37 fter and it was perfect for us.

 

 

Thanks!  Did you just stick to the short hops or do any big crossings? What part of the world were you in?

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6 hours ago, Uli Kunkel said:

 

 

Thanks!  Did you just stick to the short hops or do any big crossings? What part of the world were you in?

Mostly short hops, the longest leg was from Refuge Cove to Eden, maybe 220 Nm, 2 nights. Perhaps 10 by 150 Nm overnight legs, the rest shorter. Kids coped just fine with the long sailing legs, by doing other stuff. When it was bumpy, they thought it fun as long as they could see that parents were not scared. Boredom was the biggest issue for them, biggest issue for me was cleaning the tuna the boy kept catching. A 5 kg takes me an hour from hookup to cleanup, kills my off watch sleep.

We started in Bass Strait, heading up the AU coast. First couple of months was a bit more serious ocean cruising, after that was very easy coastal holidaying. Kids are proud they did the first bit, but enjoyed the tropical day sailing holiday more.

We, driven by the kids, are kicking around the idea of a 6 day passage to New Cal, or a 2 week passage to NZ. Although it may not be aparrent at the time, it gets in their blood...

 

 

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On 11/28/2018 at 1:00 PM, eric1207 said:

Some 25 years ago a neighbor started a 10 year circumnavigation on a 1979 Cal 39 with 2 kids about the age of yours.  They are great kids, successful adults now.

I know a family like this, too.  Instead of watching TV and playing video games or on social media, the kids were screaming around in their own planing dinghy and having real world adventures in exotic locations.  Both are very successful young adults now.

On 12/3/2018 at 2:30 AM, Se7en said:

Perfect time. Mine were 6 and 10.

Buy as big a modern plastic boat as you can afford. Spend more time doing fun stuff, less chasing rust, or varnishing. Enjoy easy sailing. Kids that age are happy to wash once a week and eat whatever there is. 250 litres of water would last us 10 days easy. Flat bread or biscuits keeps for ages.

Coastal cruise somewhere warm, 200 ish mile hops at the most. That can get you to some out of the way locations. Spend the rest of the time doing fun shit with the kids. They will love it, and if you choose a simple plastic boat, you will too.

Something like a Sun Odyssey 37 etc. We did  a trial on a dehler 34, then bought a small 37 fter and it was perfect for us.

Similar program as my friend's.  The wealth of experience they have is so much more valuable than any other type of education.  They actually did two cruises. The first was when the older kid was 2 and they actually had to stop for a short while for the younger to be born.  The second cruise was when the kids were 10 and 12.  First was on a 36' boat, second was on a 46' boat.  One warning regarding cruising with a family with very young kids:  it is also known as Singlehanding with family.

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