Mid

US farms are going bankrupt at an alarming rate.

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US farms are going bankrupt at an alarming rate. Trump’s trade war is partially to blame.

More than 80 farms in the upper Midwest have recently filed for bankruptcy.

 

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A total of 84 farms in the upper Midwest filed for bankruptcy between July 2017 and June 2018, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune. That’s more than double the number of Chapter 12 filings during the same period in 2013 and 2014 in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana.

Farms that produce corn, soybeans, milk, and beef were suffering due to low global demand and low prices, according to economists, and Trump’s trade war is making the problem even worse. China has slapped billions of dollars worth of tariffs on US agriculture exports in response to Trump’s tariffs on Chinese products. Other countries, including Canada, have also added duties to US agriculture products in response to Trump’s tariffs on all imported steel and aluminum.

 

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/11/27/18114566/trump-trade-war-china-farm-bankruptcy

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I just hope the bankrupts were all Trump supporters and not collateral damage.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I just hope the bankrupts were all Trump supporters and not collateral damage.

They're not.

 Maybe the land owners, and corporate officers are, but the people who actually do the work, probably didn't even vote. They probably couldn't vote because they aren't registered voters in that state/county. Most farm labor is itinerant, and mobile..... Lots of them tend to fly under the radar. Some may even be illegal workers doing what they can to get by....

I see the melon pickers here every year. Mostly brown skinned people with steady hands. Some Caribbean guys, some white college kids, who mostly look beat to hell at the end of the day. I know I wouldn't last a day out in a melon field in the end of May..... Not even when I was young and strong.

 "Nickle a melon in the truck" one guy told me..... The farmer gets about $.60 for them. The wholesaler gets $1.20... The Grocery store gets what?

 This year they didn't even bother to pick, the prices were so low. "Penny a piece" the picker said.... "The boss wouldn't even gas up the truck for that."

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3 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

They're not.

 Maybe the land owners, and corporate officers are, but the people who actually do the work, probably didn't even vote. They probably couldn't vote because they aren't registered voters in that state/county. Most farm labor is itinerant, and mobile..... Lots of them tend to fly under the radar. Some may even be illegal workers doing what they can to get by....

That's fairly ignorant. Corn, soybeans, beef and milk are typically done in-house by owner/operators. I know I voted.

There are those that cash rent the land but they're in the worst position to hire help as margins are razor thin or negative. Hell, I'm gonna be negative this year. The good news (if you can call it good) is prices will spike as land in production decreases.

Cattle, corn and beans are what I'm in.

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The usual suspects are being pretty quiet. I expected a “bankrupt farmers are clearly bad business people who didn’t pay up-front in cash” by now.

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1 hour ago, austin1972 said:

That's fairly ignorant. Corn, soybeans, beef and milk are typically done in-house by owner/operators. I know I voted.

There are those that cash rent the land but they're in the worst position to hire help as margins are razor thin or negative. Hell, I'm gonna be negative this year. The good news (if you can call it good) is prices will spike as land in production decreases.

Cattle, corn and beans are what I'm in. 

So how much do you spend on cancer causing Roundup?  

Still got the same advisors on the take from Monsanto?

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44 minutes ago, random said:

So how much do you spend on cancer causing Roundup?  

Still got the same advisors on the take from Monsanto?

Do you come with a switch to turn off your asshole mode or is is jammed on permanently?

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1 hour ago, Bent Sailor said:

Do you come with a switch to turn off your asshole mode or is is jammed on permanently?

With his head jammed firmly up his ass he is actually close to being a perpetual motion machine. 

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Well done fuckwits.  I ask after his welfare, worried that he is being poisoned and bled dry by Monsanto and all you have is abuse?

I care, you got nothing.

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5 hours ago, Raz'r said:

The usual suspects are being pretty quiet. I expected a “bankrupt farmers are clearly bad business people who didn’t pay up-front in cash” by now.

The Best Americans will love the expansion of their property holdings at fire sale prices. 

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7 hours ago, austin1972 said:

That's fairly ignorant. Corn, soybeans, beef and milk are typically done in-house by owner/operators. I know I voted.

There are those that cash rent the land but they're in the worst position to hire help as margins are razor thin or negative. Hell, I'm gonna be negative this year. The good news (if you can call it good) is prices will spike as land in production decreases.

Cattle, corn and beans are what I'm in.

My bad. I was thinking about crops that are (mostly) hand picked. Melons, tree fruits and row crops like lettuce, etc.

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13 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

My bad. I was thinking about crops that are (mostly) hand picked. Melons, tree fruits and row crops like lettuce, etc.

let's leave lettuce alone for now :ph34r:

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18 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:
8 hours ago, austin1972 said:

That's fairly ignorant. Corn, soybeans, beef and milk are typically done in-house by owner/operators. I know I voted.

There are those that cash rent the land but they're in the worst position to hire help as margins are razor thin or negative. Hell, I'm gonna be negative this year. The good news (if you can call it good) is prices will spike as land in production decreases.

Cattle, corn and beans are what I'm in.

My bad. I was thinking about crops that are (mostly) hand picked. Melons, tree fruits and row crops like lettuce, etc.

so you didn't read the article

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11 minutes ago, dacapo said:

let's leave lettuce alone for now :ph34r:

Caesar is dead! :ph34r: Lettuce mourn......

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5 minutes ago, hermetic said:

so you didn't read the article

I read the clip, but my mind did a disconnect and brought me back to where I live, where a lot of crops are hand harvested (Not the beef, the corn, or peanuts, or soy), instead of the upper mid west where the article is about. Like I said, my bad.

 (And the Romaine lettuce in my garden is perfectly safe, and very tasty! Hope it didn't get hit by last night's frost)

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14 hours ago, Nice! said:

Are we getting tired of all the winning  LOSING yet?

 

FIFY, MATE, NO CHARGE!

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15 hours ago, Mid said:

US farms are going bankrupt at an alarming rate. Trump’s trade war is partially to blame.

More than 80 farms in the upper Midwest have recently filed for bankruptcy.

 

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/11/27/18114566/trump-trade-war-china-farm-bankruptcy

Ever consider paying what it costs to produce your food?

 

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5 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Ever consider paying what it costs to produce your food?

 

So, blaming the consumer? That’s a new twist. So you really do hate the free market, you know, supply and demand?

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5 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

So, blaming the consumer? That’s a new twist. So you really do hate the free market, you know, supply and demand?

Ignorant fool.

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

My bad. I was thinking about crops that are (mostly) hand picked. Melons, tree fruits and row crops like lettuce, etc.

They're called truck farming. Mine is mechanized.

As far as paying for your food, they're commodities on a world market. The trade war hurts a lot though.

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13 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Ignorant fool.

Here’s a little lesson. When you plant expecting the market to be stable, and then when you harvest you find that the biggest buyer is no longer in the market, what happens to the price you receive?

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Here's that other twist in ag economics; if you have a great year, so did most everyone else increasing supply and lowering price.  If you have a rotten year due to bugs, hail, untimely rains, fire or any of the other risks in farming, chances are most everyone else did to lowering the supply and raising the price, BUT YOU DON'T HAVE MUCH TO SELL. That's why crop insurance and subsidies make economic sense if you value cheap food as a measure of social control as well as national security.

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Just now, learningJ24 said:

Here's that other twist in ag economics; if you have a great year, so did most everyone else increasing supply and lowering price.  If you have a rotten year due to bugs, hail, untimely rains, fire or any of the other risks in farming, chances are most everyone else did to lowering the supply and raising the price, BUT YOU DON'T HAVE MUCH TO SELL. That's why crop insurance and subsidies make economic sense if you value cheap food as a measure of social control as well as national security.

Saorsa will be along shortly to spout some BS about how you’re wrong and tariffs are great for raising funds to pay for govt.

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29 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

They're called truck farming. Mine is mechanized.

As far as paying for your food, they're commodities on a world market. The trade war hurts a lot though.

Yah, but what do you know about farm economics.

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2 hours ago, Saorsa said:

Ignorant fool.

You should put that in your signature.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Here’s a little lesson. When you plant expecting the market to be stable, and then when you harvest you find that the biggest buyer is no longer in the market, what happens to the price you receive?

Why would anyone, as a farmer, plant expecting a stable market or stable weather?

Seems like that's been known for centuries.  Bumper crops lower prices because of overproduction.  Bad weather increases prices because production drops.

That's why there are spot and future markets. 

2 days ago - Share US farms are going bankrupt at an alarming rate. Trump's trade war is partially to blame. ... Farms that produce corn, soybeans, milk, and beef were suffering due to low global demand and low prices, according to economists, and Trump's trade war is making the problem even worse.

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30 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Why would anyone, as a farmer, plant expecting a stable market or stable weather?

We don't but we do expect a stable global trade position. We worked hard to get where we were and it all got crushed. It will either take a long time to come back or it just won't come back.

Seems like that's been known for centuries.  Bumper crops lower prices because of overproduction.  Bad weather increases prices because production drops.

That's highly oversimplified. It's a global marketplace.

That's why there are spot and future markets. 

2 days ago - Share US farms are going bankrupt at an alarming rate. Trump's trade war is partially to blame. ... Farms that produce corn, soybeans, milk, and beef were suffering due to low global demand and low prices, according to economists, and Trump's trade war is making the problem even worse.

Trade war. After 'low global demand', it should say 'because of the trade war. Brazil is selling a shitload of beans to China. The African swine fever is reducing demand some. That's very short term.  You can thank factory farming for that epidemic. Family farms going tits up will be filled by factory farms.

Enjoy that. Corp. oligopolies have your best interest in mind compared to the prideful family farmer.

 

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42 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Why would anyone, as a farmer, plant expecting a stable market or stable weather?

Seems like that's been known for centuries.  Bumper crops lower prices because of overproduction.  Bad weather increases prices because production drops.

That's why there are spot and future markets. 

2 days ago - Share US farms are going bankrupt at an alarming rate. Trump's trade war is partially to blame. ... Farms that produce corn, soybeans, milk, and beef were suffering due to low global demand and low prices, according to economists, and Trump's trade war is making the problem even worse.

Sorry @austin1972, I knew Soarsa-the-Foolish would be along to blame the farmer for not anticipating Trump’s policies. I guess he has a bit of a point in that Trump is doing what he said - but:

1) no one thought he’d actually do it and

2) I assume the cost of futures eats into normal profits, and the farms on the edge already are the least likely to be able to afford the insurance policy.

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1 minute ago, Raz'r said:

Sorry @austin1972, I knew Soarsa-the-Foolish would be along to blame the farmer for not anticipating Trump’s policies. I guess he has a bit of a point in that Trump is doing what he said - but:

1) no one thought he’d actually do it and

2) I assume the cost of futures eats into normal profits, and the farms on the edge already are the least likely to be able to afford the insurance policy.

Shit only really works if you have a shitty crop. I buy it. It's paid once in 14 years and it certainly didn't make me whole if you take the the entire timeline into account. I buy it for a catastrophic hail event. Other than that, it's a necessary scam.

 

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Had a chat with my German origin, now blue passport carrying boss. 

The wuestion, could trump win again? Of course, given how the e-college works he’s got a good shot, unless, and this I don’t know

unless the folks like farmers who supported him, realize, that he’s NOT on their side no matter what he says.

of course, the Ds would need a Humphrey like character who could unite the rural folks and the megalopolis-dwellers, and I’ve not yet seen that candidate.

so, question, are farmers changing their mind, or are they open to it?

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No. They Republican here no matter what. It's a blood sport between Chicago and rural IL. They give 0 fucks about who is sitting so long as it's an R. Blame Mike Madigan for that.

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2 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

No. They Republican here no matter what. It's a blood sport between Chicago and rural IL. They give 0 fucks about who is sitting so long as it's an R. Blame Mike Madigan for that.

That’s what I figured, so I think the answer is, Trump’s got a chance in 2020. Maybe a good chance.

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28 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

 

That's true and  as a global marketplace and with commodities you can live in Timbuktu, buy a crop from the US and sell sell it to China.

You would have to look at GLOBAL production and demand.  And, from the cite, global demand was falling, as cited,  corn, soybeans, milk, and beef were suffering due to low global demand and low prices,

 

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This is before the trade war.

https://www.drovers.com/article/cattle-and-beef-markets-are-not-independent-global-markets

" The second half of the year could bring more demand challenges. Numerous countries have implemented retaliatory tariffs in response to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum. In some cases tariffs include beef and will have a direct impact on beef markets. The bigger impacts are likely to be indirect in a range of impacts on other markets. Other meats, especially pork, are more directly impacted among the wide range of U.S. products subject to tariffs. Negative impacts on exports of other meats means that more total meat must be absorbed in the domestic market. Total U.S. red meat and poultry production is expected to increase nearly three percent year over year to a record level over 102 billion pounds. Any slowdown in meat exports will undoubtedly add pressure to domestic meat prices."

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31 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

That's not what the reports show. Example here - https://www.cmegroup.com/trading/agricultural/soybean-reports.html

The words were from the report above.

and it looks like production is up slightly per Drovers.com

Fed cattle prices have declined seasonally but are holding generally better than expected. Remember in early April when June Live Cattle futures dropped under $100/cwt. and have since traded as high as $110/cwt. and now are trading about $108. Of course, June isn’t over and the next couple of weeks could have a big impact on commodity markets as the reality of a trade war settles on markets. Feeder cattle prices have declined seasonally from spring peaks but have remained quite robust thus far.

Capture1.jpg

But, you were referring to soybeans.

From the American Soybean Association Winter Journal

A year ago, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Outlook Forum, the department’s top commodity analysts said that market fundamentals favored soybeans among the major crops, “particularly with expectations of continued growth in China’s soybean imports.”

The intervening year has provided nothing to change the bullish demand outlook for soybeans and soy products. If anything, demand prospects have improved to the point that USDA now expects soybean acreage to equal corn acreage in 2018 and sees soybeans planted on more land than any other feed or food crop in 2019.

 

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2 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

The words were from the report above.

and it looks like production is up slightly per Drovers.com

Fed cattle prices have declined seasonally but are holding generally better than expected. Remember in early April when June Live Cattle futures dropped under $100/cwt. and have since traded as high as $110/cwt. and now are trading about $108. Of course, June isn’t over and the next couple of weeks could have a big impact on commodity markets as the reality of a trade war settles on markets. Feeder cattle prices have declined seasonally from spring peaks but have remained quite robust thus far.

Capture1.jpg

 

Are you aware that you can buy pork at the super market for your avg. sized family, cheaper than raising two hogs to equivalent size, and having them butchered by a USDA certified butcher?

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Just now, Mrleft8 said:

Are you aware that you can buy pork at the super market for your avg. sized family, cheaper than raising two hogs to equivalent size, and having them butchered by a USDA certified butcher?

Yes and no.  If I raised the hogs I would butcher them myself.  I would save a lot on styrofoam trays, cling wrap and union labor.

Here in FL, we have enough feral hogs that I wouldn't even have to buy the hogs they are considered a nuisance and can be hunted year round

bowhog.png

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3 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Yes and no.  If I raised the hogs I would butcher them myself.  I would save a lot on styrofoam trays, cling wrap and union labor.

Here in FL, we have enough feral hogs that I wouldn't even have to buy the hogs they are considered a nuisance and can be hunted year round

bowhog.png

Feral hogs taste significantly...... Uhhh..... Different from hogs that were bred for meat production, and fed the kind of things that make for a fat, tasty porker....

 There are lots of feral hogs around here, and lots of people shoot them..... Mostly because they are destructive, and dangerous, not because they taste good.

 The prison gets lots of them every week from the local farmers. The prison then sends them to the local USDA butcher who dices them up at some pre-arrainged cost.

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20 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Different isn't bad.  There are those who can't stand Scottish grass fed beef.

It appears that China has had some problems with their hogs leading to some of the soybean demand problems.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-soybean-demand/crop-drop-china-swine-fever-outbreak-to-curb-its-soybean-imports-idUSKCN1NW0PH

Different isn't bad. But IMHOP Feral hog meat is pretty foul. Grass fed beef isn't high on my list of favorite foods either.

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1 hour ago, Saorsa said:

The words were from the report above.

and it looks like production is up slightly per Drovers.com

Fed cattle prices have declined seasonally but are holding generally better than expected. Remember in early April when June Live Cattle futures dropped under $100/cwt. and have since traded as high as $110/cwt. and now are trading about $108. Of course, June isn’t over and the next couple of weeks could have a big impact on commodity markets as the reality of a trade war settles on markets. Feeder cattle prices have declined seasonally from spring peaks but have remained quite robust thus far.

Capture1.jpg

But, you were referring to soybeans.

From the American Soybean Association Winter Journal

A year ago, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Outlook Forum, the department’s top commodity analysts said that market fundamentals favored soybeans among the major crops, “particularly with expectations of continued growth in China’s soybean imports.”

The intervening year has provided nothing to change the bullish demand outlook for soybeans and soy products. If anything, demand prospects have improved to the point that USDA now expects soybean acreage to equal corn acreage in 2018 and sees soybeans planted on more land than any other feed or food crop in 2019.

 

That's the point. China is closed now.

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6 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

That's the point. China is closed now.

Not to the rest of the world.

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5 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

To me it is. Brazil is loving it.

I was going to do Sesame this year, until I had that unexpected vacation in early June.... That kind of screwed up most of my operation, especially after that late freeze took out 3/4 of my citrus crop right as it was flowering....

 So.... This coming year I'll try again. But with something different.... A long term investment crop, instead of a rotation thing..... It's a gamble, but I'm only dedicating 5 acres to it for the first year to see how it goes....

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21 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

That's the point. China is closed now.

A few weeks ago I read that China's demand for soybeans would exceed world production in a year or two.

If Brazil sells all it's soybeans to China, where do Brazil's former customers get their soybeans?

You a re dealing in an international commodity.  Once it's sold off the farm and on a bulk grain carrier it can be resold and go anywhere.

It's worked that way with oil for years.

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12 hours ago, random said:

I ask after his welfare, worried that he is being poisoned and bled dry by Monsanto

"So how much do you spend on cancer causing Roundup?" 

That's not concern. No way to even spin it as such. You're an asshole and full of shit. 

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2 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

A few weeks ago I read that China's demand for soybeans would exceed world production in a year or two.

If Brazil sells all it's soybeans to China, where do Brazil's former customers get their soybeans?

You a re dealing in an international commodity.  Once it's sold off the farm and on a bulk grain carrier it can be resold and go anywhere.

It's worked that way with oil for years.

Kind of like the way the Cubans got Connecticut Valley wrapper leaf tobacco? The farmer sells it to someone in Canada, who sells it to someone in France, who sells it to Cuba....

 So Austin can sell his Soybeans to a company in Canada, who sells them to a company in Germ..... No that wont work.... Trump has tariffs on those countries too..... Austin sells his Soybeans to a company in......

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6 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

A few weeks ago I read that China's demand for soybeans would exceed world production in a year or two.

If Brazil sells all it's soybeans to China, where do Brazil's former customers get their soybeans?

You a re dealing in an international commodity.  Once it's sold off the farm and on a bulk grain carrier it can be resold and go anywhere.

It's worked that way with oil for years.

China slapped a 25% tariff on US beans. Just because it's a commodity doesn't mean the supply isn't tracked.

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6 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

China slapped a 25% tariff on US beans. Just because it's a commodity doesn't mean the supply isn't tracked.

That reduces demand in China.  Isn't there a rest of the world?

What do you do with the 4.7Billion subsidy on soybeans?

https://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/government/donald-trump-tariffs-iowa-soybean-farmers-federal-aid-20180827

Farmers suffering economic consequences from the trade wars President Donald Trump heated up by imposing tariffs will get up to $4.7 billion in government payments starting in September — with the possibility of more subsidies if agriculture export prices keep floundering.

Most of the direct payments — $3.6 billion — will go to soybean farmers who are facing prices that have dipped to nearly decade lows. Pork producers will receive the second-highest payment of $290 million. Dairy, corn, sorghum, wheat and cotton producers also will receive aid under the plan announced Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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I think I figured it out.... Trump likes to completely fuck things up, then put a bandaid on it and say "What a good boy am I"

Sometime before the next election, he'll remove all the tarrifs and claim "We won the trade war".  Farmers will be able to sell soybeans again, so they will love him.  The corporate farms will especially love him, because they will have picked up lots of cheap land in the meantime.  The corporatocracy in action!

 

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45 minutes ago, Bent Sailor said:

"So how much do you spend on cancer causing Roundup?" 

That's not concern. No way to even spin it as such. You're an asshole and full of shit. 

Hey Bent, mate, you're trying too hard.  It shows.

Get back to us when you have matured a bit more, then we might let you play with the big boys.

243.gif

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32 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

That reduces demand in China.  Isn't there a rest of the world?

What do you do with the 4.7Billion subsidy on soybeans?

https://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/government/donald-trump-tariffs-iowa-soybean-farmers-federal-aid-20180827

Farmers suffering economic consequences from the trade wars President Donald Trump heated up by imposing tariffs will get up to $4.7 billion in government payments starting in September — with the possibility of more subsidies if agriculture export prices keep floundering.

Most of the direct payments — $3.6 billion — will go to soybean farmers who are facing prices that have dipped to nearly decade lows. Pork producers will receive the second-highest payment of $290 million. Dairy, corn, sorghum, wheat and cotton producers also will receive aid under the plan announced Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The moment you start paying subsidies to your domestic growers and then try selling on the international market you'll trigger the anti-dumping provisions that most countries have in place to stop exactly that sort of activity. And fair enough too because that sort of activity is EXACTLY what you guys bitch about WRT China.

You idiot President kicked this off, you guys pay the consequences. OK it's the farmers who take it in the arse, maybe the lesson to learn is not to vote for an idiot who thinks he can 'win' a trade war based on commodities.

Even if Trump removes the tariffs and China follows suit, what makes you think you'll get the market back? The Brazilians may well have established themselves as a reliable supplier. Now you have to displace them.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

The moment you start paying subsidies to your domestic growers and then try selling on the international market you'll trigger the anti-dumping provisions that most countries have in place to stop exactly that sort of activity. And fair enough too because that sort of activity is EXACTLY what you guys bitch about WRT China.

You idiot President kicked this off, you guys pay the consequences. OK it's the farmers who take it in the arse, maybe the lesson to learn is not to vote for an idiot who thinks he can 'win' a trade war based on commodities.

Even if Trump removes the tariffs and China follows suit, what makes you think you'll get the market back? The Brazilians may well have established themselves as a reliable supplier. Now you have to displace them.

FKT

That's the problem... As Austin mentioned above, these people are going to continue to vote R regardless of who it is.  And the arse fucking will continue for them. 

IMHO, it's programming (brainwashing?).  "Better a Russian than a Democrat", and "They are coming for your guns / turn your kids gay / force abortions on you".... you know, a regular day at Faux news. 

(Still not quite Mark Twain): "It's easier to con a man than to convince him he's been conned"

Wasn't there a recent report about the alarmingly high suicide rate among farmers?  I don't think that's what most people consider 'winning'

 

 

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15 hours ago, random said:

Well done fuckwits.  I ask after his welfare, worried that he is being poisoned and bled dry by Monsanto and all you have is abuse?

I care, you got nothing.

So you're saying your not just an asshole but you are actually a disingenuous asshole?

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11 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

It's ironic seeing Saorsa trying to tell Austin all about his business.

Most of the right wing fools are pretty good at it.

As I recall JerKZ made a specialty of it.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

So you're saying your not just an asshole but you are actually a disingenuous asshole?

Save your childish name calling for someone who gives a fuck.

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1 hour ago, random said:

Save your childish name calling for someone who gives a fuck.

Says the guy chiming in to prove he gives a fuck. :rolleyes: 

Get back to us when you have matured a bit more, then we might let you play with the big boys.

243.gif

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Fuck!

I fucking love this place!

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5 hours ago, Saorsa said:

That reduces demand in China.  Isn't there a rest of the world?

What do you do with the 4.7Billion subsidy on soybeans?

https://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/government/donald-trump-tariffs-iowa-soybean-farmers-federal-aid-20180827

Farmers suffering economic consequences from the trade wars President Donald Trump heated up by imposing tariffs will get up to $4.7 billion in government payments starting in September — with the possibility of more subsidies if agriculture export prices keep floundering.

Most of the direct payments — $3.6 billion — will go to soybean farmers who are facing prices that have dipped to nearly decade lows. Pork producers will receive the second-highest payment of $290 million. Dairy, corn, sorghum, wheat and cotton producers also will receive aid under the plan announced Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

You really do love you some massive govt intervention in the marketplace. Please turn in your conservative credentials, we got some new fascist party cards made up. Going like hot cakes.

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4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

The moment you start paying subsidies to your domestic growers and then try selling on the international market you'll trigger the anti-dumping provisions that most countries have in place to stop exactly that sort of activity. And fair enough too because that sort of activity is EXACTLY what you guys bitch about WRT China.

You idiot President kicked this off, you guys pay the consequences. OK it's the farmers who take it in the arse, maybe the lesson to learn is not to vote for an idiot who thinks he can 'win' a trade war based on commodities.

Even if Trump removes the tariffs and China follows suit, what makes you think you'll get the market back? The Brazilians may well have established themselves as a reliable supplier. Now you have to displace them.

FKT

It was a bitch to establish it. It'll be even harder getting it back. So yeah, you're pretty on point.

Europe can't replace the sales we enjoyed with Shyna.

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34 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

You really do love you some massive govt intervention in the marketplace. Please turn in your conservative credentials, we got some new fascist party cards made up. Going like hot cakes.

   The downfall of Stalinism was it took a Stalin to run it. When the middle men in that system no longer had to fear for their lives if they indulged in corruption or failed to preform..it all fell apart. 

 I think the lesson is if you go fascist/totalitarian go all the way or stay on the couch.   

 

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59 minutes ago, Mark K said:

   The downfall of Stalinism was it took a Stalin to run it. When the middle men in that system no longer had to fear for their lives if they indulged in corruption or failed to preform..it all fell apart. 

 I think the lesson is if you go fascist/totalitarian go all the way or stay on the couch.   

 

So Trump can’t even get THAT right!

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21 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

So Trump can’t even get THAT right!

You sound surprised.

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2 minutes ago, random said:

image.png.360be68d6067cc5d3e15268f57c1bf56.png

When you absolutely, positively have to tell everyone you don't give a fuck - custom memes. Accept no substitutes. :lol: 

 

2 hours ago, Bent Sailor said:

Get back to us when you have matured a bit more, then we might let you play with the big boys.

243.gif

 

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33 minutes ago, Bent Sailor said:

When you absolutely, positively have to tell everyone you don't give a fuck - custom memes. Accept no substitutes. :lol: 

 

 

When it's such a low bar, such a soft target, sometimes the temptation is just too much.

It worked well, tells the complete story in so few words.

Keep trying though, it's fun to watch.

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25 minutes ago, random said:

When it's such a low bar, such a soft target, sometimes the temptation is just too much.

It worked well, tells the complete story in so few words.

Keep trying though, it's fun to watch.

 

1 hour ago, Bent Sailor said:

Get back to us when you have matured a bit more, then we might let you play with the big boys.

243.gif

 

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11 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It's ironic seeing Saorsa trying to tell Austin all about his business.

Well, the last time I recall him mentioning his business, I recall that he had all his high end beef contracted for to the extent that it was too good for him to eat.

I don't recall him mentioning soybeans but they seem to be the interest now. 

I was afraid that he might have missed the multi-billion dollar subsidy that Trump came out with to offset the Chinese tariffs.  These are new and in addition to existing subsidies.

It appears, at least from one source, that the subsidy actually resulted in farmers being willing to sell at lower prices since the government would make up the difference.

Quote

Soybean prices slumped on Tuesday thanks to a large selloff. Ongoing concerns about trade between the U.S. and China complemented expectations for a record American crop. Following the announcement that the U.S. will provide subsidies to farmers affected by the trade war, some farmers have begun selling their soybeans and factoring in the $1.65 per bushel subsidy that they will receive from the government on 50% of 2018 production.

 

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39 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Well, the last time I recall him mentioning his business, I recall that he had all his high end beef contracted for to the extent that it was too good for him to eat.

I don't recall him mentioning soybeans but they seem to be the interest now. 

I was afraid that he might have missed the multi-billion dollar subsidy that Trump came out with to offset the Chinese tariffs.  These are new and in addition to existing subsidies.

It appears, at least from one source, that the subsidy actually resulted in farmers being willing to sell at lower prices since the government would make up the difference.

Celebrating subsidies. YCMTSU.

 

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3 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Celebrating subsidies. YCMTSU.

 

Pinnacle of Regressive, Righty hypocrisy!!!

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6 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Celebrating subsidies. YCMTSU.

 

Pointing out their existence is acknowledgement of reality  not a celebration.

 

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3 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

Pointing out their existence is acknowledgement of reality  not a celebration.

 

But you somehow think subsidies will make the individual farmers whole. Bankruptcy numbers show you’re wrong. Again.

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Most farmers have more than one crop.

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17 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I was going to do Sesame this year, until I had that unexpected vacation in early June.... That kind of screwed up most of my operation, especially after that late freeze took out 3/4 of my citrus crop right as it was flowering....

 So.... This coming year I'll try again. But with something different.... A long term investment crop, instead of a rotation thing..... It's a gamble, but I'm only dedicating 5 acres to it for the first year to see how it goes....

Hijack - but are you talking about growing sesame for seeds?  How would that work on your scale? 

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Just now, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Hijack - but are you talking about growing sesame for seeds?  How would that work on your scale? 

Sesame gets a pretty good price per acre for high quality food grade seed. Oil grade, and livestock grade are lower, and would not be viable for me.

50 cents a pound, with potentially 1,000- 1,200 Lbs. per acre yield. 5 acres would get (+-) $2,500 with a cost to plant and harvest at (+-) $100 per acre, so a $2,000 crop that requires little or no irrigation, little or no weed control.... Basically it's a plant it and harvest 150 days later it crop.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

But you somehow think subsidies will make the individual farmers whole. Bankruptcy numbers show you’re wrong. Again.

You have no idea what I think so you make up bullshit. 

Banruptcies are up and down it depends on the area.

Screen_Shot_2018-05-15_at_8.42.50_AM.png

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1 minute ago, Mrleft8 said:

Sesame gets a pretty good price per acre for high quality food grade seed. Oil grade, and livestock grade are lower, and would not be viable for me.

50 cents a pound, with potentially 1,000- 1,200 Lbs. per acre yield. 5 acres would get (+-) $2,500 with a cost to plant and harvest at (+-) $100 per acre, so a $2,000 crop that requires little or no irrigation, little or no weed control.... Basically it's a plant it and harvest 150 days later it crop.

Thanks for the explanation.  How equipment intensive are planting/harvest? 

 

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