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Frumious Bandersnatch

Star racing on TV is compelling to watch

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Link to daily racing highlights videos in the SA front page   

Totally enjoying watching the racing live and tape-delayed on youtube in the Bahamas Wednesday and Thursday among 2 dozen Star crews who are really good starters, tacticians and risk takers. And learned that Finn and Laser sailors make terrific Star sailors, skippers and crews. 

Brazilians are slick fast downwind. Old guys are competitive in Stars.  Star masts are a challenge to keep pointed skyward in breeze.

Wednesdays race 4 squall was very exciting and fun to watch.  The several broken sticks were replaced overnight and the Frenchman Rohart managed to win a race Thursday with a retuned new one.

Who says watching racing at 4 knots is boring? Not me.  Check it out the SSL on youtube  

 

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Watching the boats racing downwind, I was asking me if rule 42 is no longer existent or is it like in the Finn class with "all armes allowed over 10kts?"

please give some input or I will loos my faith in judging....

got from the SSL website 

  • Rule 42 amended + judgment on the water any more input? couldn't find the SI's
  •  

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Loving the SSL Finals coverage...!

The commentators are making my head explode with their constant mis-pronunciations of the sailors' names (they're right there...!  Talking to them every day...  You'd think they'd learn how to say their fucking names...!)

There have been Rule 18.3 calls at the weather mark in a couple of races and these dip-shits are calling it "tacking too close..."  Makes them sound ignorant - like the guys who do rugby for American audiences...

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43 minutes ago, BêteNoir said:

Loving the SSL Finals coverage...!

The commentators are making my head explode with their constant mis-pronunciations of the sailors' names (they're right there...!  Talking to them every day...  You'd think they'd learn how to say their fucking names...!)

There have been Rule 18.3 calls at the weather mark in a couple of races and these dip-shits are calling it "tacking too close..."  Makes them sound ignorant - like the guys who do rugby for American audiences...

Mendenblatt.... argh.

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Glad that you are enjoying it. It doesn't do much for me, but no one is forced to watch.

The big turn-off of the SSL is not the slow, old-fashioned, ugly boats: I'm cool with that. What is obnoxious is all the arrogance and BS hyperbole. E.g., STAR SAILORS LEAGUE FINALS THIS WEEK WILL DETERMINE THE BEST SAILOR IN THE WORLD: "The top talent in our sport (sic) will take to the warm, azure blue waters of Nassau’s Montagu Bay this week for the Star Sailors League Finals, to determine the world’s greatest sailor (sic, emphasis in original)".

There's nothing new about this self-congratulatory nonsense, either. To quote Garry Hoyt, Go For The Gold (1972), pp. 73,74:

Quote

The Star class skippers for a long time let it be known, officially and unofficially, that they were the world's best class with the world's best sailors. They were sustained in this modest claim largely by the questionable evidence of their own applause. But because they said it often, and with impeccable assurance, their claim began to take on a certain legitimacy. And since the self-awarded aristocracy provided a convenient reason for disdaining the outside competition, which was also the only thing that could disprove it, they built themselves quite an image. The 5.5's also picked up this bit, and somehow were able to translate "spending power" to read "sailing skill".

No one argued that there were many excellent sailors in these classes. What galled was the abrasive Aryan arrogance of it all. Plus their undemocratic unwillingness to mix it, man to man, out in the alley.

Star is just one of many fine OD classes. Nothing special.

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17 hours ago, Frumious Bandersnatch said:

Finn and Laser sailors make terrific Star sailors, skippers and crews.

Yes, exactly. Gary Hoyt again (p.74):

Quote

So it was with a great sense of vindication that the small-boat sailors of the world saw Paul Elvstrom smite the philistines from their pedestals by almost casually toppling world championships in the Star and the 5.5. And - oh, sweet revenge - he did it to them by frequently employing dinghy tactics like sailing by the lee, and other little peasant pursuits that the aristocrats had missed by not looking beyond their noses. 

Elvstrom is the single best example of the synergistic benefits of competing in a variety of classes. He was better in each because he was better in all. He did not try to protect his prestige and reputation in a hothouse atmosphere, but risky them freely in all the toughest classes. And won! Now there is a sailor!

Augie Diaz is a modern example of the above.

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8 hours ago, patrese said:

 

  • Rule 42 amended + judgment on the water any more input? couldn't find the SI's
  •  

If I understood the comment from one of the pundits correctly, rule 42 goes out the window in 6TWS and above, and then it's a free for all.

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What is even more aggravating is the nearly complete lack of appreciation for the crew position.

They are mentioned only occasionally while the folks on the helm are given god-like status. I'd be

willing to go there if the guy on the helm had to move a 100 kilo sack of rocks across the boat

each tack/gybe and sail alone. Aren't these boats sailed by two person teams??

The commentary is so full of Kiwi sailing slang and incorrect statements ("rounding mark 5" comes to mind)

that any non sailboat racer can't possibly know what's going on. Of course this is an exclusive club of talented

sailors (including the crews) and it is being covered exactly like bar room chatter in a NZ Yacht Club.

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Knowing that the Star class hull tolerances are relatively wide, it would be interesting to know which builders are making the fast boats and which teams are using which hull shapes, unless the whole fleet are identical, which would also be good to know. 

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5 hours ago, Svanen said:

Yes, exactly. Gary Hoyt again (p.74):

Augie Diaz is a modern example of the above.

Robert Scheidt is the currently the most prominent example of Laser to Star ‘success’ stories. There are many others - Augie, Ed Adams for starters.

Scheidt had legendary downwind abilities in Lasers.   He quickly got up to speed in Stars and is still a force.

Stars are great to sail - dreadfully slow downwind but upwind they just humm along and give you a great satisfaction when you’ve got it all dialed in.  Big mainsail is fully powered up at about 15 knots and beyond that they are a Bear to sail fast.

Fitness is a key part of success in the class, thus the Finn/Laser to Star connection.  Crew weight limit of 420# leveled things a bit in heavy air.  Prior to that heavy-air crew weights were well over 500#.  A Finn/Laser crewman at about 6’4 & 230# was highly sought after.  The ability to hike out away from the boat (gaining an additional 3# of RM for every 1” of distance out from the centerline) is key.  Phil Trinter is still one of the premier crewman in Stars - very tall and 250 # plus.  He’s a champion Force 5 sailor as well.

Ed Adams won the worlds and Euros back in the mid eighties and had Tom Olsen crewing.  That hyped up the “find a 230# Laser sailor” riff that’s always been around the boat.

The rig is challenging to master and, good Star sailors have rig tuning abilities that translate well to bigger boats.

Tradition-bound class that struggles to gain new blood in many areas as the boat is low performance and big bucks to campaign.  

Lots of classic old Star sailors and fleets around the better yacht clubs of the world who are surely enjoying watching the SSL league.   Great to see the boat get its due again.

Traditionally you would head to San Diego to sail with the best Star fleet in the world.  I don’t see anything to make me, and many others, change that long held opinion.

Depth of talent at a Star Worlds is always impressive.

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I have a couple of friends who race Stars, and have no desire to piss on that class. Pretty much every knowledgeable sailor acknowledges that Star competition includes many excellent racers.What gets up people's noses are the silly suggestions that (i) the Star is some sort of ultimate wonder boat that can only be sailed well by people with decades of class-specific experience, and (ii) a Star champion is somehow head and shoulders above champions in any and all other OD classes ("the world's greatest sailor", blah blah blah).

oysterhead makes valid additional points.

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4 minutes ago, Svanen said:

I have a couple of friends who race Stars, and have no desire to piss on that class. Pretty much every knowledgeable sailor acknowledges that Star competition includes many excellent racers.

What gets up people's noses are the silly suggestions that (i) the Star is some sort of ultimate wonder boat that can only be sailed well by people with decades of class-specific experience, and (ii) that a Star champion is somehow head and shoulders above champions in any and all other OD classes ("the world's greatest sailor", blah blah blah).

oysterhead makes valid additional points.

Old-timers at my YC back in the eighties didn’t see what was coming with Laser sailors.  Ed Adams then Robert Scheidt went straight to the top of the Star class . Took each just a couple seasons.

Elvstrom smoked everyone in the class w/o any probs.

Talent wins.  Period.

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The SSL should cease this vainglorious nonsense. It is not only false but needlessly alienates other sailors, which the class can ill-afford to do (as you accurately say, it "struggles to gain new blood in many areas as the boat is low performance and big bucks to campaign").

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2 minutes ago, Svanen said:

The SSL should cease this vainglorious nonsense. It is not only false but needlessly alienates other sailors, which the class can ill-afford to do (as you accurately say, it "struggles to gain new blood in many areas as the boat is low performance and big bucks to campaign").

Agree on the self-promoting riff - it’s weird, so typical of the class.

Go to the Bacardi Cup, Worlds, Euros or NA’s and check all the blue blazers and formal shenanigans.   The class has a big Blue-Blood contingent, many of whom wouldn’t know Peter Burling from the waiter.

You beat them on the water, then sit back at dinner and let the gasbags have their moments.   Not too diff from other classes tho.

The class somehow survives.  I’m ok with that.

Best sailor/inspiration I had coming up was Joe Duplin.  Star champion and coach of many fine Laser sailors at Tufts.  Joe pushed everyone into Lasers and Stars.  Built his own Star boats.  Bill Buchan,  Buddy Melges - same thing.  They did it all back then.  Got a lot of people fired up on Stars and DIY projects.

Dennis Connor, , Mark Reynolds, Vince Brun, Robbie Haines, Eric Doyle, George Szabo - the SDYC guys. Truly great experience to race agst that kind of talent.  That fleet def stands out in my mind as the best of any class I saw /raced.

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32 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

You beat them on the water, then sit back at dinner and let the gasbags have their moments.   Not too diff from other classes tho.

True enough, up to a point.

E.g., Wayfarer regattas and rallies invariably include singing Jesper Friis' "International Wayfarer Song", as well as the "Wayfarer Fanfare". But it's lighthearted fun, and no Wayfarer champions consider that they are an elite, towering over all other sailors. 

32 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

The class somehow survives.  I’m ok with that.

Me too.

If nothing else, the Star class is the antithesis of the helmeted, NASCAR-style, foiling multihull drag-racing beloved by Larry Ellison and others who know and care nothing about real sailing. So, extra points for that.

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Wayfarers look pretty cool.   Old wood boats for cruising/camping ?   Most excellent.

I would guess that an asym spin settup would be hella lot of fun singlehanded.

 

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Watching their starting strategy puzzled me. Shouldnt you be timing your start so that you cross the line at the gun at full speed.

With all that talent attributed to STAR champions, watching them sitting on the line waiting for the gun seemed a bit lame to me.

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Timed runs are more relevant to heavy boats, but also a sign of a lower standard where there is space to take a timed run at. The lines look pretty packed so holding position and reserving a front row space more important. So, doesn't look lame to me. Infact if a saw it was possible for the whole fleet to be taking timed runs I'd say that was pretty lame. 

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8 hours ago, Svanen said:

The SSL should cease this vainglorious nonsense. It is not only false but needlessly alienates other sailors, which the class can ill-afford to do (as you accurately say, it "struggles to gain new blood in many areas as the boat is low performance and big bucks to campaign").

IMO, the claim that the Star series attracts some of the best sailors in the world has an element of truth.

From time to time there are certain one-design classes that act as a rendezvous for great sailors from many different disciplines.   The best sailors in the world want to compete against each other ... whatever their specialty, they thrive on the intellectual challenge of going up against the best of the best in a one-design setting.   When a class gets this reputation it acts as a magnet to the best sailors from different classes to try their hand in this class.

This is particularly true when a keel boat class acquires this status, because different generations of sailors can race against each other. We can debate whether Rafael Nadal is a better tennis player than John McEnroe was but we will never really know. But in a keel boat Paul Cayard can go up against Paul Goodison. 

The Olympics had two keel boat classes as recently as 2000 . Back in the day, the Olympics determined which was the "magnet" keel boat class. Instead of replacing the Star with a contemporary keel boat, WS/ISAF dropped the category altogether from Olympic competition. This left the Olympics unrepresentative of one of the larger  categories of racing and depriving us from finding out just how many Olympic medals could have been won by Robert Scheidt and Ben Ainslie.   In this vacuum, the Star class has assumed the role of  the one -design class that attracts the best sailors from different generations.

It may be somewhat outdated and slow but there is not an obvious alternative.

One cannot disagree that the list of sailors who have raced in Stars is pretty amazing.

 

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The class may be stuffy behind the scenes, i don't know. But I've not picked that up from the coverage. They're promoting an event so obviously going to big up the competitors. Plus... it's a pretty good line up!

I also don't pick up that they believe only star sailors are good enough to win. Isn't the whole premise that the star offers a platform where, supported by good crews, helms can come in and demonstrate their talent? 

I think there is decent acknowledgement of crews, but ultimately the event is about pulling in top helms to race against star legends. They're provided with top crews and boats, but the narrative is very much about how they will adapt and compare against class stalwarts. 

I also don't get the issue with wanting commentators to use rule numbers. Who really uses rule numbers in conversation unless needing to be very specific. When in any other sport do you hear commentators refer to rules by their number in the rule book. How bizarre. I think the commentators have been the best I've heard for sailing coverage.

Then a side topic in to cruising by wayfarer. Nothing against it. But... really? 

Anyway, I've really liked it but it would seem I've been watching a listening to a different event to some if you. 

 

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16 minutes ago, Mozzy Sails said:

Timed runs are more relevant to heavy boats, but also a sign of a lower standard where there is space to take a timed run at. The lines look pretty packed so holding position and reserving a front row space more important. So, doesn't look lame to me. Infact if a saw it was possible for the whole fleet to be taking timed runs I'd say that was pretty lame. 

I cannot say i get it completely. STARS are keel boats. They may not be heavy, but are not dinghys either. In such a competitive race where seconds count i cant see anything wrong in  charging through the fleet at full speed. If not anything else, gaining a boat length advance during the first  moments of the race would give you clean air.

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2 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

It may be somewhat outdated and slow

 

While a true statement, it sure has made for some great watching on the computer screen instead of working! Speed is not important when the fleet is deep. Having such a great diversity of sailers (18 year old Guido Gallinaro to Iain Percy / Paul Cayard), great breeze, venue and commentary helps. It is also equally interesting to watch Moths and 18 foot skiffs. It's all sailing!

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12 minutes ago, Omer said:

I cannot say i get it completely. STARS are keel boats. They may not be heavy, but are not dinghys either. In such a competitive race where seconds count i cant see anything wrong in  charging through the fleet at full speed. If not anything else, gaining a boat length advance during the first  moments of the race would give you clean air.

Doesn't matter how fast you hit the line, if there's not space. Obviously there will be space somewhere, but not at the favoured end and unlikely to be lined up with your timed run that you don't lose seconds finding it. 

Timed runs are very much beer can and maxi racing strategy. Dinghies, small keelboats and sports boats of decent standard will be hokd from 1 minute then accelerating with 15 seconds or less to go, in any fleet of decent standard.

Theres quite a lot of footage on line of star racing from previous Olympics to review strategy.

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I wonder something which i am sure a lot of sailors like me wonder too. Being a champion of nothing, having never sailed a STAR,  but an averagely able sailor, if i were given a STAR  for a few months to learn the boat and to trim it properly, and allowed to enter the race. Would it be certain that I would be the last boat to finish with a magin of disgrace compared to the last boat to finish among such professionals?

What i would probably do is to glue myself to the stern of the race favourite and follow their every move.  Probably not a smart thing. But imagine i finish not as the last boat to finish. Would that make me a STAR boat elite?

So.. What are the biggest dynamics of it all?  In any of these races if the last boat to finish did exactly that, woud they finish better than they did?

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2 hours ago, Omer said:

I cannot say i get it completely. STARS are keel boats. They may not be heavy, but are not dinghys either. In such a competitive race where seconds count i cant see anything wrong in  charging through the fleet at full speed. If not anything else, gaining a boat length advance during the first  moments of the race would give you clean air.

Each class, dinghy or keel boat will have an optimum time and distance to accelerate to full speed from a holding position.  It might be 20 seconds on a Star and it might be 10 seconds on a Laser.   It is about 14 seconds on the class I compete in.

In a highly competitive fleet start, it is a very common tactical situation to be forced to line up closer to the line than the optimum acceleration distance.   If the star boat acceleration to max speed takes 20 seconds, you might expect to see the fleet line up  15 seconds from the line.

Starting is a balancing act.  You would like to sheet in and accelerate with 20 seconds to the gun, and 20 seconds to the line. However you cannot do this if you are turning on the engines in the second row in bad air from the boats in the front row. You will take 25+ seconds to get to the line.  You want BOTH speed and position.  Inevitably in a top fleet, everyone wants both speed and position and they will edge forward in the last 30 seconds to maintain position.   

The teams that make the best starts often combine two essential ingredients.   #1 Time/Distance Judgement.  If they are lined up 11 seconds from the line, they pull the trigger at 11 seconds  #2 They have tuned for an acceleration gear that gets them up to speed slightly faster than the competition.  You may not hit the line at max speed but you are going to get there faster than anyone else. 

For example last February the team I sailed with in Aussie spent a whole day practicing judging the distance 10 seconds from the line.....and developing a gear that gets us up to speed in 14 seconds vs 16 seconds.   We had a "start" gear that we set up prior to the start, and then went back to upwind set up about 20 seconds after the start and never used start mode again during the race. If we could set up for a start 15 secs from the line, yes great, but 9/10 we were forced closer to the line and we were not intimidated when that happened.   Then every morning before the first start we would practice again to stay sharp.     The guys in this Star fleet are at a whole different and higher level than us.  So I watch closely to see what they are doing Hamish Pepper did a couple of brilliant starts.  You can see Scheidt changing gear shorty after the starts when the camera finds him early enough.   I agree with those who say it is fascinating to watch

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19 minutes ago, Omer said:

I wonder something which i am sure a lot of sailors like me wonder too. Being a champion of nothing, having never sailed a STAR,  but an averagely able sailor, if i were given a STAR  for a few months to learn the boat and to trim it properly, and allowed to enter the race. Would it be certain that I would be the last boat to finish with a magin of disgrace compared to the last boat to finish among such professionals?

What i would probably do is to glue myself to the stern of the race favourite and follow their every move.  Probably not a smart thing. But imagine i finish not as the last boat to finish. Would that make me a STAR boat elite?

So.. What are the biggest dynamics of it all?  In any of these races if the last boat to finish did exactly that, woud they finish better than they did?

I have a good friend who has a simple "hero or zero" strategy.

He doesn't pretend to be a tactical maestro. The boat is strict one design and he is a moderately competent helm so he has the boat speed to stay with the middle of the fleet.  

So in big regattas, he starts near the boat and immediately tacks onto port.  He is inevitably the first boat to go right. He doesnt just go right. He bangs the right hand corner.  His theory is that 50% of the time he will be right!  Since its always a minority who tack immediately, he believes math is on his side. When the right pays, he will round the windward mark in the top ten. When the left pays, he will be in the back of the fleet but if he had gone left he would only have rounded in top 25.  

He has a lot of fun and is of of the most relaxed guys I have ever met on the race course.

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24 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

Each class, dinghy or keel boat will have an optimum time and distance to accelerate to full speed from a holding position.  I

.   #1 Time/Distance Judgement.  

I used to practice (in my head) time/distance while I coasted to a stop in car or on bike

Also, big fleet starts are how you can turbo-charge your starts.  Laser fleets of 50+ boats really push you into high/focus mode. Major hits if you’re early, big gains (clear air) if you hit it right.

Travel.  Get out of your comfort zone.  After a season or two in your own district you’ve seen everyone and know who you can pull up next to and where you can get a good start.

Watch Tom Slingsby start or mark round - aggressive/smart boathanfling moves come from real-time experience.

Practice in heavy air.  All the moves that are tough in your boat.need to be reflex quick.  At a big event start you need your head out of the boat and not worrying if your mainsheet cleared the transom corner on a crash gybe.

When you bog on the start,  find room to move to the right side of course and then get in sequence with the shifts and pray for the miracle lift.

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Two things I look for in big Star events:

Gold star on the mainsail top section.

Sail number (indicates age of hull)

 

You earn a Gold star by winning either the Worlds or Olympics.  When it’s heating up and you’re thinking about a dicey move, that Gold star guy next to you might be more than ready to handle whatever you got for him.  It’s the fast way to sort out who’s who early in a big event.

The class lists the latest hull number to have been built.  You see a boat with hull number over 8500 and you know that’s a stiff hull and prolly ready to go/fast.   Boats numbered in the 7000’s snd early 8000’s have some miles on them, not (usually) burners downwind.

’Magic’ boats don’t really make it at the top level.  That is, the hulls of Stars start ‘oil-canning’ after a couple seasons of hard campaigning.  

Most sailors race Maders (German built) , Follis (Italian) or Lillias (Italy).   Each have their own diehard owners.  Maders were considered the best “all-rounders” and Follis were faster off the breeze.   These things change over time but, builder choice is a big part of the winners mindsets.

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I checked it out and watched it for around 45 minutes, which is a long time for me. good production, good sailors, good racing and the Star is a classic that's hard to sail well.

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2 hours ago, blunderfull said:

Two things I look for in big Star events:

Gold star on the mainsail top section.

Sail number (indicates age of hull)

 

You earn a Gold star by winning either the Worlds or Olympics.  When it’s heating up and you’re thinking about a dicey move, that Gold star guy next to you might be more than ready to handle whatever you got for him.  It’s the fast way to sort out who’s who early in a big event.

The class lists the latest hull number to have been built.  You see a boat with hull number over 8500 and you know that’s a stiff hull and prolly ready to go/fast.   Boats numbered in the 7000’s snd early 8000’s have some miles on them, not (usually) burners downwind.

’Magic’ boats don’t really make it at the top level.  That is, the hulls of Stars start ‘oil-canning’ after a couple seasons of hard campaigning.  

Most sailors race Maders (German built) , Follis (Italian) or Lillias (Italy).   Each have their own diehard owners.  Maders were considered the best “all-rounders” and Follis were faster off the breeze.   These things change over time but, builder choice is a big part of the winners mindsets.

Scheidt was sailing an 8100 series, which, if a true hull number, would make the boat over 10 years old. Sounds unlikely that a 10 year old hull would still be competitive in top-flight regattas.  Guessing the Star class builders add roughly 50 new hulls per year total.

Anybody know who was sailing which Stars...Mader, Folli, Lillia?

Good on Augie Diaz for retuning the winners rig before the last day. They were fast.

Enjoyed the onboard interview of the winning Skipper and crew right after the last finish. Good story.

 

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12 minutes ago, Frumious Bandersnatch said:

Scheidt was sailing an 8100 series, which, if a true hull number, would make the boat over 10 years old. Sounds unlikely that a 10 year old hull would still be competitive in top-flight regattas.  Guessing the Star class builders add roughly 50 new hulls per year total.

Anybody know who was sailing which Stars...Mader, Folli, Lillia?

Good on Augie Diaz for retuning the winners rig before the last day. They were fast.

Enjoyed the onboard interview of the winning Skipper and crew right after the last finish. Good story.

 

You’d have to dig a bit to find out where  that 8100 series boat came from.   Some guys charter or borrow a local’s boat. Then, how much Star sailing has Scheidt done lately?  

If you’re not in a big campaign mode you might just want to ‘go with what ya brung’ and see what happens.

Shipping a Star from Europe to Caribbean is no small expense.  I’d guess a lot of Euro guys are chartering.

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4 minutes ago, pudge said:

I find it shocking that people are just discovering this. 

Almost as shocked to see Cayard out there again charging hard.

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Good thread and watching the races is good fun and FREE. But I do wonder about some minor issues

The commentators are  ignorant of some of the rules. For instance, there's more than port/starboard around the windward mark. I don't think I heard them use the word 'zone' once. They also refer to the starting marks as 'windward' and 'leeward'. With a proper line, the ends are the pin buoy and the (flag on the)  boat.

With respect to the sailors, they are all at least two classes above me. But I do wonder why so many sail the port lay line to the windward mark. Unless you are ahead of most others this is not a good percentage strategy. 

I watched most of the starts and it appears that almost all boats approach the line with at least some speed, as Mambo Kings described (post 29). In fact, there have been several General Recalls and a bunch of Individuals. 

The digital 'overview' doesn't work too well and is often inaccurate. But as I wrote, the viewing is free and I am not complaining.

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The crewman is “hooked in” to help support him while hiked out.  He’s wearing a vest with a plate where you pop the line-end ball into.

Before class allowed the wire line (can’t remember - late ‘70’s??) hiking out was a total strength move.   You’d wear weight vests/wool sweaters to add RM.

Even when your hooked in, a tacking battle in big breeze is gut busting for the crew.  In addition to popping up at the very last moment in the tack, the crew has to pop up & into the boat while popping then the old stay ,  the jib sheet then hike out and set the new stay and sheet the jib.  All the while feeding info to skipper since you have the best view of the proceedings down low on the water.

In addition to what the crew has to handle on tacks, you throw in another job when you round up at the bottom mark.  There’s a ‘ Mast Ram’ at the bottom of the mast which is set as you round the top mark.  Setting the Ram stiffens the lower section of the mast for downhill sailing.   Since the Star mast is super bendy and light , if you don’t release the Ram at the bottom mark, before heading back upwind and, then sheet in, you have a good chance of mast breaking off clean at the deck.  Rare to see at top levels.

Great crews ride First Class, comp courtesy the skipper.   

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Jorge Zarif has had a great year. 1st SSL Finals, won Star Worlds, 1st ISAF World Cup Hyeres, 1st ISAF World Cup Marseille. Beating his coach (Scheidt) must be pretty rewarding too.

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26 minutes ago, Wavedancer II said:

Zarif and his crew simply amazing today. 

I don't recall them being behind much the entire day.    Starts, tactics, boathandling - completely switched on today.   First time they had raced together.

Well done.

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44 minutes ago, Wavedancer II said:

Zarif and his crew simply amazing today. 

Pedro Trouche had an awesome regatta, I think there may have been some Zarif guy in the boat with him.

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Sorry, tried to watch it but after I saw the antics downwind I hit the Pause button.

I enjoyed the windward stuff.

 

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What do people think about the knockout format?

I'm not a fan of medal races as I think it devalues the regatta series and often doesn't produce the obvious 'event winning' performance that the TV supposedly needs.

However i quite like this format. Apart from Mendelblatt  didn't think there were too many huge shocks. But it was enough t make it exciting. I also Zarif was a deserved winner. You could see all week he had the boat speed to beat Robert, but Scheidt seemed to have better fleet smarts. 

Final day highlightz here:

 

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Thank you to whoever is the $ behind the SSL because for all the production expense there appeared to be less than a couple thousand on YouTube watching the final. 

Would like to see the drone get all up in there far more. It’s an event where they could really push the proximity. Watching I was also thinking of all the interesting birds eye opportunities missed. Also a nasty habit of the production to miss too many important engagements and manoeuvres. Too many important boat on boat tacks and gybes missed by switching to tracker IMO. Nitpicking...

It’s interesting to see multiple Olympic medalists struggle at the leeward mark in the breeze. Olympic champions wide and wide with the main flogging - makes you realize just how hard it is. The Finn sailors seemed the best at it and those guys still struggled. Didn’t see any advantage being a small skipper in that boat. Certainly not in breeze.

Don't get the anti kinetics crowd ... perhaps the most compelling aspect of the racing. Very cool to see the huge gains when done right. 

 

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The format was cool.  We saw three races in what - 5 hours?   If this were Star Worlds that would be three days of racing.  Never liked the one race a day format.  

More drones.  Better :  let Percy call the camera coverage.  Is there a better analyst out there now?  Lester & Cavell are stuck in on racing, I enjoy listening to them.  Enthusiastic w/o too much prattling and experienced in the sport.

Say what they will about Stars, the winners write the history.   Tremendous class organization, a Pro race series with real $$ and their own coverage - w/o a lot of drama & personalities.  They are still one of the premier classes in the world.

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4 minutes ago, Starboat7838 said:

The winner at 2018 Worlds sailed the latest Lillia.....purple hull 8500 boat

I thought the purple boat was a Folli built for Lars Grael in 2015-2016

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Just now, onepointfivethumbs said:

I thought the purple boat was a Folli built for Lars Grael in 2015-2016

No ...liliia.....for sale now on class site

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zarif is a beast in those conditions..very impressive win over very very good competition..

 

watching this racing is as good as it gets for 4ksb's

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27 minutes ago, onepointfivethumbs said:

My mistake it is a Lillia.

The World’s result page still showing Zarif in #8210.   Same as SSL boat.   Didn’t watch worlds - so what do I know anyway?

 

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15 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

The World’s result page still showing Zarif in #8210.   Same as SSL boat.   Didn’t watch worlds - so what do I know anyway?

 

https://starclass.org/classic/artman/publish/article_760.shtml.html

I think Jorge chartered or bought the pictured boat, purple Lillia with the self-tacking jib would have already been in the U.S. if it debuted at Bacardi?

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19 minutes ago, onepointfivethumbs said:

https://starclass.org/classic/artman/publish/article_760.shtml.html

I think Jorge chartered or bought the pictured boat, purple Lillia with the self-tacking jib would have already been in the U.S. if it debuted at Bacardi?

Cayard’s article is a good read.   The characters you meet at a Springs or NA’ make the class all the more interesting

My first regatta in Dago I pull into the SDYC yard and spot DC leaning agst a Star talking story with a bunch of the fleet guys.   He had just won N2E, the previous day, on Stars & Stripes the big cat.   He was hanging out talking Stars like anyone else.  Cool moment.  Better when we raced and watched him hitting corners and trying anything to win in a light air day.  So much to say about Stars that you remember for the rest of your career.

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On 12/8/2018 at 12:07 PM, Omer said:

I wonder something which i am sure a lot of sailors like me wonder too. Being a champion of nothing, having never sailed a STAR,  but an averagely able sailor, if i were given a STAR  for a few months to learn the boat and to trim it properly, and allowed to enter the race. Would it be certain that I would be the last boat to finish with a magin of disgrace compared to the last boat to finish among such professionals?

What i would probably do is to glue myself to the stern of the race favourite and follow their every move.  Probably not a smart thing. But imagine i finish not as the last boat to finish. Would that make me a STAR boat elite?

So.. What are the biggest dynamics of it all?  In any of these races if the last boat to finish did exactly that, woud they finish better than they did?

Thing is, you can't follow the race favorites. The best Star sailors use lot of kinetics to get the boat going. The boat is relatively light and the crew can have a great impact on the speed. Other than that, it's the usual package of trim/speed/tactics/strategy. 

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On 12/8/2018 at 9:49 AM, Omer said:

I cannot say i get it completely. STARS are keel boats. They may not be heavy, but are not dinghys either. In such a competitive race where seconds count i cant see anything wrong in  charging through the fleet at full speed. If not anything else, gaining a boat length advance during the first  moments of the race would give you clean air.

As mentioned before, you need to be up there on the line if you want to have a chance of getting a good start. Charging the line on a timed run sounds good in theory, but...you  need to find a hole, and sailing towards the line with a bunch of boats flogging their sails fucks up the wind and it's almost impossible to get the boat to speed in those conditions. 

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On 12/8/2018 at 9:07 AM, Omer said:

I wonder something which i am sure a lot of sailors like me wonder too. Being a champion of nothing, having never sailed a STAR,  but an averagely able sailor, if i were given a STAR  for a few months to learn the boat and to trim it properly, and allowed to enter the race. Would it be certain that I would be the last boat to finish with a magin of disgrace compared to the last boat to finish among such professionals?

What i would probably do is to glue myself to the stern of the race favourite and follow their every move.  Probably not a smart thing. But imagine i finish not as the last boat to finish. Would that make me a STAR boat elite?

So.. What are the biggest dynamics of it all?  In any of these races if the last boat to finish did exactly that, woud they finish better than they did?

Omer,

Nuts and bolts of racing:

Elvstrom’s “Expert Dinghy/Keelboat Racing.   A Classic. The straight take on boats & tactics.

”Sailing Smart”  Buddy Melges.   

 

https://www.amazon.com/Expert-Dinghy-Keelboat-Racing-Elvstrom/dp/0812900545

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It was high quality coverage, nice to see some long-format fleet racing like that :)

 

I've always liked the idea of the Star, though not so much the idea of actually sailing them.

For all the years of them being an Olympic class I think I've only seen a cumulative about 5mins of mark roundings/race finishes in highlights which gives about 0 actual impression of how they are sailed so it was really nice to see the dynamics of them in motion.

 

 

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