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onboard coffee??

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13 hours ago, TJSoCal said:

Pour over coffee makers like the Melitta work best if you dampen the filter first, then put the grounds in and pour a couple of tablespoons of hot water on them. Allow about 45 seconds for the grounds to "bloom" and then start pouring water to brew. 

Personally I like pour over coffee better than French press, and a lot easier to clean up. 

I don't understand the "hard to clean up" knock on the French press. I pull the press out of the carafe and drop it in the sink while I dump the bulk of the grounds in the garbage or even just down the sink, rinse off the remaining grounds from the two parts, and set it out to dry. It doesn't need soap or even to be wiped with a sponge. Takes about 10 seconds.

A pour-over makes great coffee but only one cup at a time and you need filters.

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The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

And anyone who believes that Starbucks sells coffee needs to step back and give some thought to the fact that any mass marketer is limited by the average quality of the commodity on which their product is based. Estimates are that Starbucks purchases nearly 40 million kilos of beans per year and, as a result, their product is, at best, average. There's a reason they burn rather than roast - it's the only way they can get that dreadful consistency they claim as their hallmark.

Now that's not to say that you don't like what you produce - only that your claims are similar to those who say a pickup truck handles well.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I don't think I'd want to start every day looking at a used condom leaking brown fluid, no matter how good it tastes.

eeeewwww!

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1 hour ago, Moonduster said:

The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

And anyone who believes that Starbucks sells coffee needs to step back and give some thought to the fact that any mass marketer is limited by the average quality of the commodity on which their product is based. Estimates are that Starbucks purchases nearly 40 million kilos of beans per year and, as a result, their product is, at best, average. There's a reason they burn rather than roast - it's the only way they can get that dreadful consistency they claim as their hallmark.

Now that's not to say that you don't like what you produce - only that your claims are similar to those who say a pickup truck handles well.

So, let us assume the question was asked this way: "If you do not have a big enough boat to carry a coffee roaster  and trained operator on board, and want to cruise farther than 4 days away from a coffee plantation, how do you make a coffee substitute on board?" Would that make you happier?

I own both a 1 ton pickup and a Porsche. I am often asked which handles best. I tell them: with the cabover camper or 5000 lbs of machinery loaded in the back, the truck handles better, and it is absolutely true. Context does in fact matter. 

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3 hours ago, Moonduster said:

The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

And anyone who believes that Starbucks sells coffee needs to step back and give some thought to the fact that any mass marketer is limited by the average quality of the commodity on which their product is based. Estimates are that Starbucks purchases nearly 40 million kilos of beans per year and, as a result, their product is, at best, average. There's a reason they burn rather than roast - it's the only way they can get that dreadful consistency they claim as their hallmark.

Now that's not to say that you don't like what you produce - only that your claims are similar to those who say a pickup truck handles well.

Crikey Moon lighten up its the season for giving.

In the antipodes we brew and enjoy this.

 

https://nz.allpressespresso.com/roast-method-matters

4497758F-6DBA-4A0B-9325-908741479E48.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Moonduster said:

The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

Next time someone calls me a coffee snob I’m going to point to this post. 

I certainly understand that optimal coffee is better than suboptimal coffee, but to say that all suboptimal coffee, from Nescafé to fresh ground single origin beans that were perfectly roasted (gasp) 10 days ago is equally shitty strains credulity. 

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45 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

I wonder what brew they serve on this nice little sailboat?

Image result for espresso morc sailboat

Hint, it was built in New Orleans.

Beer?

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Espresso...

     The original fairing on the bottom of that little MORC boat had blistered badly within a couple of years of its being built due to the fact that it was a C-Flex hull with four layers of woven roving with no mat between the layers which was the standard practice at the time. They saved a lot of weight by eliminating the chopped strand mat and substituted milled glass fibers in the laminating resin. Problem was that the interstices between the coarse woven roving weave left little channels for water to penetrate. I think it was built at New Orleans Marine but they brought it to us at Seemann Composites to grind off the bottom and put a better barrier coat and refair. We didn't want the nasty clouds of grinding dust in the shop so hung it from an A-Frame in the little lot behind the shop backed up to one of the big NO coffee roasting factories. I think it was COMMUNITY coffee and they had a Chicory Blend that was popular with the locals. I didn't drink coffee when I started working in New Orleans but a few weeks of having a tidal wave of fresh coffee aroma come flooding over the back wall and into the shop at 9:30 like clockwork when the first shift first batch came out of the roaster and went into the grinding mill soon had me addicted. The next roaster/grinder cycle was right about lunchtime and then the last of the shift was right about 3:00 PM and was perfect for our shop breaks throughout the day. I bet you could take a core sample off of the EXPRESSO sloop and still find traces of coffee terpenes and volatiles or whatever to this day! Probably some CBD and THC in there too since that back lot was the 'Safety Session Breakroom' for the gang in our shop...

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2 hours ago, socalrider said:

Next time someone calls me a coffee snob I’m going to point to this post. 

I certainly understand that optimal coffee is better than suboptimal coffee, but to say that all suboptimal coffee, from Nescafé to fresh ground single origin beans that were perfectly roasted (gasp) 10 days ago is equally shitty strains credulity. 

surely moon duster was trolling...surely....

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On 12/11/2018 at 3:55 PM, TQA said:

Makes good coffee. However the material it is made of does not take a thread well and if you use it a lot the thread fails and it is landfill. Over the years I have had 3 - none lasted.

Get a stainless steel one, they make them for induction, that is why I know;
https://www.bialetti.com/coffee/stovetop/stainless-pots-c-1_7_21.html?zenid=gok30uupovtr17ff05j8e6ert6

Funny to see Bialetti now does filter coffee too as a new trend :)
https://www.bialetti.com/coffee/pour-over-coffee-maker-c-1_135.html?zenid=gok30uupovtr17ff05j8e6ert6

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I was MEC this morning looking at some very fancy lightweight presses and brewers, and drip sets , this is a very deep rabbit hole I'm headed down. 

 

I'm considering repurposing a corn popper with internal paddles that I could convert to a coffee roaster, being 50 miles from shore or 3 days from a roaster as Moonduster says will be very unsuitable. 

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Coffee snobs can be full of shit...

Image result for coffee from poop

Literally!

Image result for coffee from poop

Image result for coffee from poop

It does beg the question: how did they determine that civet-shit coffee was good, the first time? Are there other civet-shit precedents? Never mind, I’ll Google it

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I swear by Starbucks via instant coffee on my boat. Heat up some water and pour it in a mug and dump in a stick of Via.... stir it a bit and presto.... Pretty damn good coffee. 

 

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1 hour ago, Max Rockatansky said:

It does beg the question: how did they determine that civet-shit coffee was good, the first time? Are there other civet-shit precedents? Never mind, I’ll Google it

Yeah, the guys that tried civet shit coffee the first time must be cousins with the first guy to try oysters.

Image result for first person to try an oyster

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On 12/12/2018 at 8:53 AM, Priscilla said:

Chemex and hand grinder.

mfGFdeD.jpg

When someone drops your grinder base for you, it turns out that bell canning jars have the same diameter and thread. 

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My daughter bought one of those hand grinder pictured above. What a pain in the ass that thing is. It might be ok if you're only making a cup or two at a time, but it takes forever to get enough grounds to make a decent sized pot. She insists it's worth the trouble; I just don't see it. 

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I agree. If you've got some AC power available, this is a great grinder: quiet (as grinders go), uniform, adjusts down to "dust" if you like, and reasonably priced.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000VAWXOU/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They make a slightly cheaper version that weighs a lot less because the outer housing is plastic rather than metal but I have this one for home use.

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2 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

My daughter bought one of those hand grinder pictured above. What a pain in the ass that thing is. It might be ok if you're only making a cup or two at a time, but it takes forever to get enough grounds to make a decent sized pot. She insists it's worth the trouble; I just don't see it. 

How much coffee are you using and how fine a grind? For an 8 cup French Press it's not more than a minute or two of grinding and I use a large heaping scoop for each cup. For a large number of espresso shots with a superfine grind, ok, it could take a while. 

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

I agree. If you've got some AC power available, this is a great grinder: quiet (as grinders go), uniform, adjusts down to "dust" if you like, and reasonably priced.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000VAWXOU/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They make a slightly cheaper version that weighs a lot less because the outer housing is plastic rather than metal but I have this one for home use.

Crikey ,I will just modify my engine room to accommodate a generator so that will work.

 

 

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Not sure if it's been mentioned already, but some with some manual grinders you can remove the crank handle and chuck them in a drill if you find them too slow.

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Must be a North Americas thing, power assisted hand grinder, you people in a hurry or what.

Life is a journey not a race.

Goes with your electric sheet and halyard  winches I suppose.

Zassenhaus

Wall mounted so one hand for grind and one hand for boat that is if you have two and if you have more then happy days.

Just a modest $250.00

QbWl2fM.jpg

 

 

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Would it have killed them to make the hopper and the receptacle larger than a thimble?

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Anchored I use a kettle and a drip cone filter thing.  I have tried French press but never got the hang of it.  

At sea I have found the safest method that produces marginally acceptable coffee are the Starbucks via things or decent knockoffs.  It just makes sense in many ways other than perhaps a little expensive.  This works even better on a staggered watch cycle when not everyone is participating.  The VIA made at least 2 particularly rough trips managable.  Just heat water,  put in a thermos and you are done.   At least keep a pack or two onboard as backups.  Nothing worse than caffeine withdrawal at sea.

 

230765_7483_XL.jpg&f=1

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46 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Must be a North Americas thing, power assisted hand grinder, you people in a hurry or what.

Life is a journey not a race.

Goes with your electric sheet and halyard  winches I suppose.

Zassenhaus

Wall mounted so one hand for grind and one hand for boat that is if you have two and if you have more then happy days.

Just a modest $250.00

QbWl2fM.jpg

 

 

I bet you could chuck that into a Milwaukee right-angle drill and accomplish both. Might have to up the bean feed rate a bit.

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10 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Crikey ,I will just modify my engine room to accommodate a generator so that will work.

Even better, how about an engine-driven coffee grinder?  Where's the number for the US Patent Office???

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Are these hand grinders quiet? I realize reading this thread that my love of coffee onboard has more to do with the peace and quiet of dawn.  We rarely wake up on the water, near a road or any typical 'home' sound.

And I'm the lone riser and coffee drinker so it is personal time (I share it, equally, with the dog). 

The sound of a machine - any machine - at dawn on the water, would be blasphemy, at least in my cockpit. 

45399560735_74fa554165_o.jpg

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If you demand nothing louder than a pan of boiling water, just pre-grind the coffee before you go. 

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57 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Are these hand grinders quiet? I realize reading this thread that my love of coffee onboard has more to do with the peace and quiet of dawn.  We rarely wake up on the water, near a road or any typical 'home' sound.

And I'm the lone riser and coffee drinker so it is personal time (I share it, equally, with the dog). 

The sound of a machine - any machine - at dawn on the water, would be blasphemy, at least in my cockpit. 

45399560735_74fa554165_o.jpg

That just made me think about something. When I was working I had a habit of getting up very early, way before the rest of the crew. I'd have coffee and get most of the morning chores done before anyone else was alive.

New guys would ask why. I said it was my quite personal time, to think about all the mistakes I've made in life. So I had to get up plenty early.

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13 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Not sure if it's been mentioned already, but some with some manual grinders you can remove the crank handle and chuck them in a drill if you find them too slow.

Well, technically, that makes them Not a Hand Grinder, doesn't it?  Just sayin'...

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The hand grinders are pretty quiet.  The exact sound will depend on the beans that you are using.  Dark oily french roast beans tend to be quieter because the oil lubes the system, drier light roast beans are louder.  A hand grinder is much quieter than a powered one (no gear train involved).  Worst case you grind the beans the night before.  Hand grinders are inexpensive, so it doesn't hurt to try one.  

Most hand grinders use a 5 pointed head for the grinding handle, so you can't easily convert to drill power even if you want to.  I use this Hario model:

https://www.amazon.com/Hario-MSS-1DTB-Ceramic-Coffee-Mini-Slim/dp/B01GPMH590/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1544800293&sr=8-18&keywords=mini+coffee+grinder

Edit: I just looked at the amazon pictures and the "new and improved" Hario Mini Slim has a 6-pointed handle attachment, so it would chuck up in a drill.  

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No mention of water quality among the on the water barista crowd?

I once shocked my delicate palate when, after filling up w water on Saba rock the day before, proceeded the next hazy morning to brew some of the brilliant Puerto Rican coffee we had on board. Things became a little less hazy after I spat out the awful taste and scrambled towards the  bottled water supply for an emergency re-brew.

Not meaning to hi jack but quality starts w the quality of the water. Any comments on tap filters, tank filters, tank water treatment or, watermaker quality?

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I only use bottled water in the Atomic. It has lower TDS and leaves less scale in the boiler. At home in the super automatic I use deionized water which has near zero solids. 

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I've been using water from the tank, filtered by my Seagull IV filter.  Still, back of the mind, I wonder whether I should use bottled water but I don't carry that much for coffee making and I have no issues drinking the filtered water straight.  Wish I had the Seagull filter at home, even the fridge filter doesn't 'do' enough to mitigate taste the way I'd like.  The tap water (home), is 'almost' undrinkable still in comparison however.

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    When I was running a cabinetshop for a big beach resort in the Islands, the locals drank more tea in the morning than coffee. I got into the habit because there was always a pot of hot water on the coffee maker next door at central receiving and those restaurant individually packaged teabags. A fresh brewed cup of tea was far better than the dregs from the institutional coffeepot and the locals often would leave a big bag of bush tea or fresh lemongrass to spice things up a bit. 

    I opened up shop early and headed next door and someone had just filled the teapot with water from a gallon plastic bottled water jug still sitting next to the machine. The hotel made RO water but it made lousy tea or coffee and there was always a case of distilled bottled water next to the coffee station. I picked a nice Black Pekoe bag and put in my mug and poured the steaming water from the pot over it. It looked strangely 'light' for black tea much like after one puts a heavy dose of lemon juice in it which sort of bleaches the dark color. I double checked my teabag wrapper to see if I had mistakenly used a lemon tea variety or Constant Comment which has a good dose of orange peel which lightens it.

    The locals usually drink their tea with milk but someone had left some nice local honey so I put a couple of healthy dollops in my tea and gave it a stir. The water was not fully heated due to my haste and I was able to take a big mouthful without burning and gulped it right down. All of a sudden my mouth and throat were burning intensely and not from the caloric heat of the tea! I spit what I hadn't swallowed out onto the concrete slab and the vile concoction made the concrete bubble and boil up! I poured some more from my cup on the slab and it was like ALKA SELTZER foaming up. I raided the little fridge and drank all the milk that was there hoping that milk would help neutralize whatever I had drank and went to the restroom to try and gag myself. The guy who had first put the pot on was pouring his tea when I got back. I warned him and told him what had happened to me and about them the guy who maintains the dozens of golf carts on the resort came in from the cafeteria. His workstation/bench was right next to the coffee and he looked over and noticed the gallon water jug that he kept his Battery Acid hygrometer (looks like a turkey baster) to top off the 6 volt batteries and it wasn't there. He picked up the gallon jug which the tea pot had been filled and looked at the label and pointed out his illegible attempt to write 'Battery Acid Do Not Use' over the printing on the label. The other guy said there were no fresh bottled water available and he had just looked around and spotted the Battery Acid bottle and used it unknowingly! The golf cart guy splashed some more on the floor and there was the answer to the 'Hot Tea' mystery. I was rushed to the new clinic up on the hill and took the bottle with me and had some ulceration in my mouth and back of my throat but the milk must have helped with what got to my stomach. It wasn't full strength acid in the bottle but had picked up some acid each time the mechanic had dipped his baster in the distilled water and it had a kick to it. 

    The hotel management wrote both those guys up for the sloppy handling of haz mat and I got teased at the cafeteria for a couple of weeks. A new OSHA approved container was added to the golf cart bench and that was the end of it. I did buy a little mini version of the battery tester/baster and started taking it with me to the coffee/tea station as well as the cafeteria and used it to stir my beverages after that aventure. The West Indians really appreciate a White Boy with a sense of humor!

 

Battery Hydrometer

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26 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

    When I was running a cabinetshop for a big beach resort in the Islands, the locals drank more tea in the morning than coffee. I got into the habit because there was always a pot of hot water on the coffee maker next door at central receiving and those restaurant individually packaged teabags. A fresh brewed cup of tea was far better than the dregs from the institutional coffeepot and the locals often would leave a big bag of bush tea or fresh lemongrass to spice things up a bit. 

    I opened up shop early and headed next door and someone had just filled the teapot with water from a gallon plastic bottled water jug still sitting next to the machine. The hotel made RO water but it made lousy tea or coffee and there was always a case of distilled bottled water next to the coffee station. I picked a nice Black Pekoe bag and put in my mug and poured the steaming water from the pot over it. It looked strangely 'light' for black tea much like after one puts a heavy dose of lemon juice in it which sort of bleaches the dark color. I double checked my teabag wrapper to see if I had mistakenly used a lemon tea variety or Constant Comment which has a good dose of orange peel which lightens it.

    The locals usually drink their tea with milk but someone had left some nice local honey so I put a couple of healthy dollops in my tea and gave it a stir. The water was not fully heated due to my haste and I was able to take a big mouthful without burning and gulped it right down. All of a sudden my mouth and throat were burning intensely and not from the caloric heat of the tea! I spit what I hadn't swallowed out onto the concrete slab and the vile concoction made the concrete bubble and boil up! I poured some more from my cup on the slab and it was like ALKA SELTZER foaming up. I raided the little fridge and drank all the milk that was there hoping that milk would help neutralize whatever I had drank and went to the restroom to try and gag myself. The guy who had first put the pot on was pouring his tea when I got back. I warned him and told him what had happened to me and about them the guy who maintains the dozens of golf carts on the resort came in from the cafeteria. His workstation/bench was right next to the coffee and he looked over and noticed the gallon water jug that he kept his Battery Acid hygrometer (looks like a turkey baster) to top off the 6 volt batteries and it wasn't there. He picked up the gallon jug which the tea pot had been filled and looked at the label and pointed out his illegible attempt to write 'Battery Acid Do Not Use' over the printing on the label. The other guy said there were no fresh bottled water available and he had just looked around and spotted the Battery Acid bottle and used it unknowingly! The golf cart guy splashed some more on the floor and there was the answer to the 'Hot Tea' mystery. I was rushed to the new clinic up on the hill and took the bottle with me and had some ulceration in my mouth and back of my throat but the milk must have helped with what got to my stomach. It wasn't full strength acid in the bottle but had picked up some acid each time the mechanic had dipped his baster in the distilled water and it had a kick to it. 

    The hotel management wrote both those guys up for the sloppy handling of haz mat and I got teased at the cafeteria for a couple of weeks. A new OSHA approved container was added to the golf cart bench and that was the end of it. I did buy a little mini version of the battery tester/baster and started taking it with me to the coffee/tea station as well as the cafeteria and used it to stir my beverages after that aventure. The West Indians really appreciate a White Boy with a sense of humor!

 

Battery Hydrometer

Hell of a tale!

- Stumbling

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On 12/10/2018 at 7:32 AM, Russell Brown said:

I tried the Aero Press on one trip and then gave it away. Too many moving parts for me. 

Seriously?  If you think an Aeropress has TOO many moving parts, you should probably just not own a sailboat. What? 4 things to keep track of?  Fuck sake. Welcome to the kiddie pool. 

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Actually, I do fairly long singlehanded races on my boat and like I said, coffee is important. My boat is rather complex and can be a challenge to keep upright at times. Making coffee, let alone finding all the necessary things needed to make coffee has to be as simple as possible. I take ground coffee when racing and, like I said I use a Melita cone and filters, which is a whole lot easier than the Aeropress with it's tiny filters and multiple small parts. I cut a hole in the counter top that holds my small thermos, but it can still be a fun challenge to get the next batch of coffee made when its rough. I'm also a bit of a coffee snob, so the coffee has to be good, no matter how insane it is to try to make it.

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On 12/14/2018 at 4:18 PM, thereefgeek said:

Seriously?  If you think an Aeropress has TOO many moving parts, you should probably just not own a sailboat. What? 4 things to keep track of?  Fuck sake. Welcome to the kiddie pool. 

Russel was very kind to you. Now would be a good time to STFU.

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On 12/14/2018 at 11:38 PM, Kris Cringle said:

Are these hand grinders quiet? I realize reading this thread that my love of coffee onboard has more to do with the peace and quiet of dawn.  We rarely wake up on the water, near a road or any typical 'home' sound.

And I'm the lone riser and coffee drinker so it is personal time (I share it, equally, with the dog). 

The sound of a machine - any machine - at dawn on the water, would be blasphemy, at least in my cockpit. 

45399560735_74fa554165_o.jpg

They make a little noise, but it's a nice satisfying crunch rather than an electromechanical whirr. They are also quite quick if you are grinding coarse, it can take a while for fine grinds. 

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On 12/14/2018 at 8:31 AM, DDW said:

I only use bottled water in the Atomic. It has lower TDS and leaves less scale in the boiler. At home in the super automatic I use deionized water which has near zero solids. 

I’m thinking there is an inherent conflict between scale-free machinery and optimal extraction of coffee.  Deionized water makes crap coffee.  Decent extraction water makes scale. Those who would daily sacrifice themselves on the altar of Coffea must endure some toil and trouble.  

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On 12/13/2018 at 11:00 AM, Rasputin22 said:

Coffee snobs can be full of shit...

Image result for coffee from poop

Literally!

Image result for coffee from poop

Image result for coffee from poop

Tried it, tasted like crap

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On 12/14/2018 at 5:09 PM, Ishmael said:

I bet you could chuck that into a Milwaukee right-angle drill and accomplish both. Might have to up the bean feed rate a bit.

Youre onto it, I got a hario grinder and an old electric drill and voila!

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Russel, I epoxied the cone to a second top of a thermos, so it became a screw on cone.

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On 12/10/2018 at 2:15 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

If forced into it, you can just add coffee grounds to a pot of boiling water and pour it through a paper towel into the cup.

I had a friend who brewed camp coffee this way, but instead of the paper towel filter, he added an egg to the pot. I'm not sure of the exact technique, but the egg is supposed to capture the grounds. He called it Swedish coffee. The filtering was inefficient, but the coffee was tasty.

My apologies to the Swedes.

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Have used a Bodum SS french press for many years. Keeps the coffee nice and hot. Multiple cups.

How good the coffee tastes depends on what goes into it. images.crateandbarrel.jpg.abf77b46b38b0f8797116ea745a729b4.jpg

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10 hours ago, toddster said:

I’m thinking there is an inherent conflict between scale-free machinery and optimal extraction of coffee.  Deionized water makes crap coffee.  Decent extraction water makes scale. Those who would daily sacrifice themselves on the altar of Coffea must endure some toil and trouble.  

So, you carry your own coffee water, carefully selected for mineral content on board?

Yeah, we're getting into coffee snobbism here. Adding up the criteria so far: Stay within 4 days of a coffee producing region. Roast your own beans onboard. Grind them yourself: we know from prior posts by Moonduster that this requires a commercial grinder that will hold at least 2 kg of beans, the little hand held jobs are crap. Store a supply of carefully blended water with the right balance of the right minerals. Use only a boiler fed machine that will develop at least 14 bars pressure. You will need to add a large genset to power the roaster, grinder, and machine.

Others of us have a life. Personally I use instant coffee brewing water. Just add water, and it's ready to use. 

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Because I demand only the very best on-board coffee, I had to upgrade my boat to accommodate such critical equipment as climate-controlled coffee bean storage, commercial grinders (different grinders for different beans), and a restaurant-grade coffee bar/cafe espresso maker.  Anything else is simply not worth it and utter bullshit.  This is the only place it’s at for good coffee on-board.

My galley (see it and weep, little sailor boys!):

9313326C-30DD-47BF-A458-35C20289D120.jpeg

A5720117-1AA4-4C0F-AC72-036018C11137.jpeg

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4 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

I had a friend who brewed camp coffee this way, but instead of the paper towel filter, he added an egg to the pot. I'm not sure of the exact technique, but the egg is supposed to capture the grounds. He called it Swedish coffee. The filtering was inefficient, but the coffee was tasty.

My apologies to the Swedes.

Most of the cowboy coffee I have consumed had egg shells added to the pot for grinds settling.  

As long as you were not late in getting your coffee ration, it worked.   Otherwise you get a little extra calcium supplement to chew with your eye-opener!

- Stumbling

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https://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Stainless-Steel-Cool-Touch-Coffee-Pots/732498.uts?productVariantId=1635070&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=02426831&rid=20&ds_rl=1246525&ds_rl=1246528&ds_rl=1247879&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=EAIaIQobChMItaLdn52l3wIVmUsNCh2Yewf_EAQYASABEgJ73vD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I got mine at Campmore years ago.  A percolator on the stove is hard to beat.  9 minutes of perking and it's done.  Maxwell House, Chock Full o' Nuts, Eight O'Clock when A&P was still around, etc.  I am not a coffee snob.  Ground coffee is fine.  I don't use special water, I don't grind beans.  

I don't use sugar or milk either.  That way when the cup has been sitting for hours I can take a drink and it is still good.

After reading this thread I used my girlfriend's French press earlier today.  I won't be using that again.  Heat the water in a pot or kettle.  Then the FP & wait 4 minutes.  Didn't save any time.  And the coffee was weak to boot.  

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I use bottled water to keep the scale out of the machine. I'll love to do double blind taste tests with some of these snobs. When proper science enters the stage, often snobbism exits through the VOM. 

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Fuck it man, any coffee tastes good with bacon.

Dont know why they dont serve it with bacon all the time

 

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1 minute ago, toad said:

Fuck it man, any coffee tastes good with bacon.

Dont know why they dont serve it with bacon all the time

 

I personally like my bacon separate.

img_1693.jpg?w=600

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I've bought green coffee beans before and roasted them in a pan. It came out pretty well.   

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16 hours ago, Jammer Six said:

 

P.S. I don't remember sleeping with that date.

Ahhh.... even total fruitcakes are smart enough to leave you on the doorstep.

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On 12/12/2018 at 10:05 AM, IStream said:

I don't think I'd want to start every day looking at a used condom leaking brown fluid, no matter how good it tastes.

I was thinking the exact same thing!

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18 hours ago, DDW said:

I use bottled water to keep the scale out of the machine. I'll love to do double blind taste tests with some of these snobs. When proper science enters the stage, often snobbism exits through the VOM. 

A little battery acid will do wonders for the scale in your coffeepot. Ask me how I know...

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On 12/12/2018 at 11:06 PM, Jammer Six said:

I'd be willing to bet that the first guy who tried raw oysters was in a desperate, life & death fight with starvation.

I mean, wouldn't you pretty much have to be?

I find that true today

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

A little battery acid will do wonders for the scale in your coffeepot. Ask me how I know...

Coffee cleaner is just battery acid, with a different label. I'm sure someone will jump in here and say that the machine must have the proper amount of scale, and a new machine seasoned with scale, before it will produce a proper shot. 

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38 minutes ago, DDW said:

Coffee cleaner is just battery acid, with a different label. I'm sure someone will jump in here and say that the machine must have the proper amount of scale, and a new machine seasoned with scale, before it will produce a proper shot. 

The proper water used to make the coffee must come from a glacial stream in the high mountains of Bhutan.

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14 minutes ago, QBF said:

The proper water used to make the coffee must come from a glacial stream in the high mountains of Bhutan.

Exactly.... Civet poop isn't nearly exotic enough, I want my coffee to have a hint of Yeti Shit!

 

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This pot and whatever stale old coffee happens to be in that container has made me gallons upon gallons of coffee over the years. Including a few boats, campers and raft trips.

I know, just a bit snobbish.

IMG_4443.JPG

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Ashore, the trick to finding a good local coffee cafe is assess the staff: award points for visible tats, anarchic hair colours, asymmetric haircuts, androgynic looks, a point for each piercing (and double points for what non-visible ones exist), beatnik clothing and hand sewn footwear, and a total indifference to your order of a Flat White. 

At home, invest in a very decent grinder, and a mediocre espresso machine or better. Buy beans with a roast date - preferably from the weirdo in the cafe above.

Aboard, enjoy life. Drink whatever’s wet. Teach your kids to make it for you. Add rum.

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2 hours ago, HFC Hunter said:

Ashore, the trick to finding a good local coffee cafe is assess the staff: award points for visible tats, anarchic hair colours, asymmetric haircuts, androgynic looks, a point for each piercing (and double points for what non-visible ones exist), beatnik clothing and hand sewn footwear, and a total indifference to your order of a Flat White. 

At home, invest in a very decent grinder, and a mediocre espresso machine or better. Buy beans with a roast date - preferably from the weirdo in the cafe above.

Aboard, enjoy life. Drink whatever’s wet. Teach your kids to make it for you. Add rum.

A beautiful summation. :)

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sure!  on board you just need to give it some counter space and run about 6 #6 screws through the base into the counter and you're good to go!

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46 minutes ago, QBF said:

Espresso_machine_coffee_rrn_electra_been

Looks like a Dalek.

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I've been trying to figure this out for a while myself. Being the only coffee drinker in our house, I only care about one good cup of coffee in the morning (good enough for me, not Moonie). I have a stove top percolator but it makes too much for just me. I have tried an Areo Press and it does make a good cup of coffee, but I agree it has a lot of parts. Then I came across a kick starter for a "no mess French press" and ordered one during the early backer phase. They ended up meeting their $20k backer goal by a couple million, so it sounds like there is a market for this sort of home coffee gadget.

https://www.rite.company/

It's insulated stainless steel and it comes in a 1/2 liter and a 1 liter so I ordered the 1/2 liter. Being a kickstarter, it took a really long time to actually get the thing but I'm happy with the end result. It has a removable thermometer to get the water temp in the right range and an hour glass that sticks to the side with a magnet to help time the brew, all in a neat little package. Is it no mess, god no, but it might be a bit better than a standard french press. 

They had all sorts of early production issues that delayed the initial shipments, but while they were sorting all that out they designed a few different versions, so there is a ceramic and a plastic version and all sorts of accessories now as well. 

One of my favorite cups of coffee is camping in the winter and making coffee with a percolator over the fire. My dad has an old one in his camping kit that would make some slightly chewy coffee, but I always remember that coffee as being amazing. It was probably Folgers too. 

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How do I steam the milk with that Rite thing? We need two threads: one for the doppio/frenchy crowd and one for the latte crowd. There are separate steamers and frothers, but they don't work well and that's one more thing I have to buy, store, and clean. 

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9 hours ago, Slick470 said:

DDW, I drink my coffee black. I prefer simple and adding milk into the mix just adds complexity. 

Jesus, now we need three threads. I never drink coffee at all, only espresso, and only when mixed with properly steamed milk. The slope into snobbism is a steep one. 

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Christ, now we need a Vegan thread? Probably two more, one for coffee and one espresso? Do those kind even drink milk?

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8 hours ago, DDW said:

Christ, now we need a Vegan thread? Probably two more, one for coffee and one espresso? Do those kind even drink milk?

only if milk is preceded by soy or almond

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