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crankcall

onboard coffee??

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Speaking of coffee snobbery, I’m still getting used to living in the SF Bay Area. We have fancy drip here that sells for more than the really good indie espresso up in Seattle. IDGI

I’ve taken my Brikka (the Moka with a weight) aboard rentals for daysails. Was very popular with the rest of the crew. If I were doing it again, I’d take a regular Moka. As others have suggested, I’d rather focus on sailing when on the water than coffee. Tea in a Zonjrushi thermos works extremely well, but so far Midwinters racing hasn’t been cold enough for me to prefer hot tea over water beer. If I was doing long distance sailing, I’d probably go with a bag of cheap Oolong from Ranch 99 (cheap, tasty) and the Zoji. Simple, tasty, moderate caffeine, easy on the stomach if you drink the stuff all day.

Added bonus I’ve discovered on vacation in the tropics: the Zoji will keep cold water cold all day long. 

> Chocolate covered coffee beans...

you can get a bag of Cacao beans (not nibs) for cheap. High in caffeine, but a few beans will give you a headache. The only easier way to ingest caffeine is Japanese Black-Black candy or gum. But that stuff can be hard to find if you don’t have a good Japanese market nearby.

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7 hours ago, toddster said:

Seems like in the 90’s everyone was chewing on chocolate-covered coffee beans for a while, but I don’t see them around much any more.  Maybe the DEA stepped in.  I attended a wedding reception where every table had a huge bowl of CCCB and unlimited Champaign.  Everyone was seriously messed up.  

I was on an offshore race, a long, long time ago (late 80s,) where the owner of the boat brought fried, cocoa covered coffee beans for the crew to consume.   Claimed that fueling the gas cylinder was too much weight.  

Two days of chewing coffee beans with ham and cheese sandwiches was enough for me.     Yes, you get powered up on chewed beans, but it was hard on the personal plumbing after a while.    

I never went back to that boat, period.

- Stumbling

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Didn’t we have that thread before?

Anyway, plus one thousand for the stainless Bialetti. It takes standard fine-ground coffee, no pads, no capsules, no other funny business; it uses any kind of thermic energy from a campfire to an indiction oven; and is it is build so rugged that it can also be used for self defense.

Add a stainless pot for heating milk and a whisk, and you have the simplest rig for a good cappuccino, ideal for boat use. Burn another EUR 20 for an Aerolatte, and you are entering luxury class already!

Mrs. Tonner and me drink cappuccino in industrial quantities. We use that setup at home. We fill ours with that pink-label Lavaza that I grind once a week or so, but the pre-ground black or silver/red label stuff is also ok.

If you are an espresso conoisseur, you may find the coffee from it still a little to acidic, and you will miss your sciuma. For that you will need something with a thermometer and a pump.

 

 

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When my wife is not aboard, a quick Moka for me:  Mexican instant coffee, real Koko powder, a little milk, put in the microwave...done...then on to more serious chores. 

But then again, I had to drink Army coffee for two years...we also used it to clean the tracks on our tanks.  Old German trick.

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The melita drip cone, brown filters and a teapot. I can made 8 cups in 5 minutes dripping into a thermos and the quality is a function of the grounds. Folgers Columbia supreme is my boat standard and occasionally I'll get some "good stuff". Had two French presses, PITA to clean and couldn't make go juice fast enough for the crew. With a crew of 4 on any given morning after a race we'll go thru 3 "pots" before normal human function begins

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7 hours ago, jfdubu said:

The melita drip cone, brown filters and a teapot. I can made 8 cups in 5 minutes dripping into a thermos and the quality is a function of the grounds. Folgers Columbia supreme is my boat standard and occasionally I'll get some "good stuff". Had two French presses, PITA to clean and couldn't make go juice fast enough for the crew. With a crew of 4 on any given morning after a race we'll go thru 3 "pots" before normal human function begins

You own a boat and can't clean a French press? hmmmmm...

And Folgers Coffee is like Military Intelligence.

We used to be at the Brewer's in Wickford, lovely little town.

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