Sign in to follow this  
crankcall

onboard coffee??

Recommended Posts

we dont have an issue often, we are usually tied to a dock overnite and usually have shore power. But morning coffee is very important. I dont want to mess around like we do at home grinding beans and such, it needs to be simple. I have a BBQ and a small crappy propane single burner.

I'm leaning towards a Keurig , that way someone could have hot chocolate or flavored stuff if needed. 

My question is what are other people doing, and could i run a coffee maker through an inverter off two batteries ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When aboard, I love my AeroPress It really makes rather superior coffee, and takes no space. Works equally well at anchor and at the dock.  I keep a bit of ground coffee aboard (so I don't need a grinder) and keep it sealed to last long enough so it gets used before it gets even slightly not-fresh.

 

Brew_Guide-Aeropress-Step03.jpg?w=960&h=

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a powerful inverter and a large house bank that will easily drive a coffee maker. Instead, I heat up a pan of water on my propane stove and make coffee using this:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JFDHMPE/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It takes about the same amount of time, tastes good, and doesn't use up a ton of storage space. I can make many hundreds of cups of coffee on one propane fill. I can think of a hundred things I'd rather use my precious boat electrons for than boiling water.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stainless steel insulated french press and a Hario hand burr grinder, infrared thermometer (borrowed from the tool-kit) and an electronic kitchen timer and a bunch of real buffalo china mugs left over from my parents. If you drop them, you break the tile. 

100 degrees for 4 minutes and no noise to disturb the morning peace. The french press can sit in the stove fiddles and keep things warm for the second cup. No glass involved to minimize breakage.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried the Aero Press on one trip and then gave it away. Too many moving parts for me. What if you lose one of the parts? Coffee is too important. I use the Melita coffee cone and paper filters. Yes, you have to buy filters, but the cone is only one piece, doesn't really need to be cleaned, and will last about 2000 years. And it makes really good coffee, especially if you pour boiling water over the filter before making coffee. I use a turkish style (made in Japan) hand coffee grinder, sometimes chucking it up in the cordless drill. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, crankcall said:

we dont have an issue often, we are usually tied to a dock overnite and usually have shore power. But morning coffee is very important. I dont want to mess around like we do at home grinding beans and such, it needs to be simple. I have a BBQ and a small crappy propane single burner.

I'm leaning towards a Keurig , that way someone could have hot chocolate or flavored stuff if needed. 

My question is what are other people doing, and could i run a coffee maker through an inverter off two batteries ? 

I sometimes grind the beans onboard or more usually I grind a supply at home and take them or buy it ground. I use a French Press, which makes great coffee and does not involve electricity at all. You just need some way to boil water.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm also a big fan of the Aeropress.  It can get a little 'tippy' when placed on top of a cup, and you can only make one cup at a time.  

But it makes great coffee, and cleanup is super easy - take off the end and press the 'puck' into the trash. 

 

I don't like french presses because they are a pain to clean, and gets bitter if don't pour the coffee out immediately.  And they are commonly glass. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL...I'm sure that we're not telling the OP anything new.

The fact is, there's no silver bullet, especially with the requirement to be able to provide coffee AND hot water for tea and other beverages. A Keurig is a bulky, fragile, single use piece of a equipment to have on a boat. I wouldn't do it.  A standard home electric drip coffee maker carafe is fragile glass. Again, I'd avoid this and not just because it'll drain the battery.

Bottom line:  To provide coffee and/or hot water, buy an old fashioned camping percolator coffee pot and set the percolator innards aside. Use it to boil water for tea and cocoa.  When you want coffee, put the percolator innards back in. Minimal storage hassle, no filters to buy, performs the role of kettle or coffee pot.  Pre-grind coffee at home or buy your coffee pre-ground.  They come in a million colors, shapes and sizes:  https://www.amazon.com/Percolators-Stove-Top-Coffee-Makers/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A289746%2Cp_n_feature_keywords_browse-bin%3A5880988011

Pretty much the only compromise to a percolator is the slightly lengthier time it takes to brew a pot.  You didn't think you were going to escape this conundrum without some sort of compromise, did you?

As for what I, personally do? I have a 33 footer with a 3-burner propane galley and storage. I boil water in a stove top percolator and I use an all-metal body french coffee press (to avoid the glass hazard that someone mentioned). Sometimes I used ground coffee from the store, sometimes I bring a small, hand operated burr grinder and grind beans fresh.  Plastic is not an oxygen barrier. I store my coffee in a metal tin and tape off the seam around the lid.

Ya know, I might just take my own advice and ditch the french press after reading up on how to extract the best quality coffee from a percolator. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We only ever stay at docks with “table service” and have it delivered hot and fresh by the “dock boy”.  Just ring a bell, and up he comes.  (And for martinis at 5 pm too)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to beat the simplicity of a filter cone. Boil kettle. Pour onto grounds. NB Use the brown unbleached filter papers.

2 large mugs every morning watching the anchorage and getting bullied by my cat.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, IStream said:

I have a powerful inverter and a large house bank that will easily drive a coffee maker. Instead, I heat up a pan of water on my propane stove and make coffee using this:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JFDHMPE/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It takes about the same amount of time, tastes good, and doesn't use up a ton of storage space. I can make many hundreds of cups of coffee on one propane fill. I can think of a hundred things I'd rather use my precious boat electrons for than boiling water.

We do this exactly as well.  Bags of ground coffee.  Thermos / Nissian Vacuum Insulated Stainless Steel Coffee Press.  The extra coffee stay hot for quite a while so there is a good chance for a second cup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son gave me a Bialetti Italian coffee maker a few years ago. These typical Italian coffee makers (there are several makes) are mistaken as Espresso makers. You can't make Espresso without high pressure. But they work on a similar principle in that as water boils in the lower chamber, it is forced up through a second chamber, which holds ground coffee, and then up a pipe to a third chamber, which collects the brewed coffee. Not a percolater, the steaming water only travels through the coffee grounds once, and it's done. 

If you like a strong brew with no grounds, you might like one.

 

But I think they are particularly well suited to a small galley. You only want a small burner and low flame at that. There is nothing to break, all SS, easy to clean but in fact you only need to rap the coffee basket and clear it, and rinse. 

Fill the bottom chamber with fresh water, the middle basket (which fits in the lower chamber) with coffee grounds, and screw the top on and put it on a small burner. 

bialetti_-jpg.155298

After a few minutes on a low burner, the brew comes up through the middle pipe and fills the upper chamber. Once it starts spitting steam, you take it off the burner. Done. 

bialetti-brewed-jpg.155299

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yup that's why i like them.  NOT espresso per say but a facsimile thereof.  if you heat some water on the side you can cut the coffee a bit to increase your yield.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In general a French press makes better coffee than a percolator, but things are different when you're on a boat.

 

I love the coffee from me cheap little aluminum percolator when on the boat. I've tried it at home and the coffee is dreck.

 

 

The aeropress makes even better coffee than a French press, but only one cup and I drink more than that.

 

So I'd go with a percolator or metal French press, depending on how picky you are.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I'm just doing an overnight I just grind the beans at home and bring them that way to the boat.

For single serving coffee we use the Aeropress because it makes the best coffee easily.

For multi-serving coffee we use a stainless steel french press because the coffee is still good and it makes 2-4 servings at a time.

When we're on shore power we use a plug in kettle to boil the water, it's faster than the propane stove.  On the hook we use the propane stove.

In summer I've been known to make cold brew overnight.

I would never use a Keirig or other disposable cup coffee, it represents everything bad about consumable culture and that just doesn't fit into sailing.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, chester said:

yup that's why i like them.  NOT espresso per say but a facsimile thereof.  if you heat some water on the side you can cut the coffee a bit to increase your yield.

 

I love Italy and picked up (visiting) their habit of less coffee, stronger coffee. The moccha pot does that well and there was one in every room we rented. 

 

It'll never catch on in the states, too Italian. Half the fun in Italy, is watching the 'mericuns'. I think this guy was waiting for it to 'reign' in Rome. 

44444893510_e9329880d9_o.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Alex W said:

I would never use a Keirig or other disposable cup coffee, it represents everything bad about consumable culture and that just doesn't fit into sailing.  

Not to mention that it makes shitty coffee because of course it does.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

I love Italy and picked up (visiting) their habit of less coffee, stronger coffee. The moccha pot does that well and there was one in every room we rented. 

 

It'll never catch on in the states, too Italian. Half the fun in Italy, is watching the 'mericuns'. I think this guy was waiting for it to 'reign' in Rome. 

44444893510_e9329880d9_o.jpg

Hey, I have and love my Moccha pot. :)

I'm having trouble getting the "espume" when making Cuban coffee. Any tips?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:

LOL...I'm sure that we're not telling the OP anything new.

The fact is, there's no silver bullet, especially with the requirement to be able to provide coffee AND hot water for tea and other beverages. A Keurig is a bulky, fragile, single use piece of a equipment to have on a boat. I wouldn't do it.  A standard home electric drip coffee maker carafe is fragile glass. Again, I'd avoid this and not just because it'll drain the battery.

Bottom line:  To provide coffee and/or hot water, buy an old fashioned camping percolator coffee pot and set the percolator innards aside. Use it to boil water for tea and cocoa.  When you want coffee, put the percolator innards back in. Minimal storage hassle, no filters to buy, performs the role of kettle or coffee pot.  Pre-grind coffee at home or buy your coffee pre-ground.  They come in a million colors, shapes and sizes:  https://www.amazon.com/Percolators-Stove-Top-Coffee-Makers/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A289746%2Cp_n_feature_keywords_browse-bin%3A5880988011

Pretty much the only compromise to a percolator is the slightly lengthier time it takes to brew a pot.  You didn't think you were going to escape this conundrum without some sort of compromise, did you?

As for what I, personally do? I have a 33 footer with a 3-burner propane galley and storage. I boil water in a stove top percolator and I use an all-metal body french coffee press (to avoid the glass hazard that someone mentioned). Sometimes I used ground coffee from the store, sometimes I bring a small, hand operated burr grinder and grind beans fresh.  Plastic is not an oxygen barrier. I store my coffee in a metal tin and tape off the seam around the lid.

Ya know, I might just take my own advice and ditch the french press after reading up on how to extract the best quality coffee from a percolator. :)

The other compromise to a percolator is that you can't get the coffee taste out of the water if you make tea. We inherited a nice thermal jug with our 29 and it took days of soaking with vinegar and baking soda to get the taste down to acceptable levels. It took years to get all the taste out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we use a small handheld manual coffee grinder and a mocha pot. Works really well. Aprox. 2 min of grinding fills the pot, we use an alcohol burner on board for the cooking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use a french press or Bialetti on the sailboat. 

One of my shipmates swears by his Areopress, which came with a small manual grinder that disassembles and fits inside for storage.  Good for weight /space limitations. They do make great coffee and are perfect for a crew of one or a one cup type of coffee drinker.   Around week three at sea he could easily sell it by the cup. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have used both an insulated stainless French press (4 cups-2 each) and an Aeropress 2 cups at a time into the accessory Java Jug. The jug gives you a stable pressing base, and then you add more hot water to suit the number of cups or strength. The Aeropress stores inside the jug, so it takes about the same space as the French press. 

I think we prefer the French press as it involves no more effort for the second cups for both of us. And watching the world from the cockpit is what it is all about. We often keep the second cups back till we are on the move. Just set the press and cups on the lee side of the cockpit on a rubber mat till ready.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got a hand cranked coffee grinder and use both an aero press and a french press, depending on how much coffee we're making - my wife grinds the coffee while the water is boiling and she's good to go with her morning caffeine fix.  If you do get a french press, definitely get an all-stainless one - we've destroyed about 6 glass french presses over the years because of ass-hat guests...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our solution is to boil the water in the kettle on the propane stove, put a scoop of coffee in a small stainless steel filter that fits in a cup and pour.  Delicious coffee, coffee maker takes up minimal space and will not break.  Repeat as required.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have both a mocha pot (Bialetti to some-- but Bialetti are often made of some unknowable aluminum alloy like stuff..) and a Kamira on the boat. But the Kamira is really the tool of choice. 

IMG_0047.JPG

Kamira.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Madame has her Aeropress with a stainless filter. No paper, just the puck. Store bought coffee, she likes the Cuban stuff like Bustelo. The kettle just boils water, so no flavoring issues. If there were more than one cup of coffee/day consumed, there would be either a steel press or a cone with a reusable cloth or metal filter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, kent_island_sailor said:

If forced into it, you can just add coffee grounds to a pot of boiling water and pour it through a paper towel into the cup.

The other extreme from hand grinding and aeropressing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

If forced into it, you can just add coffee grounds to a pot of boiling water and pour it through a paper towel into the cup.

Campfire coffee. We had some family friends way back when who made their coffee that way, but they skipped the paper towel step. It was horrible coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Campfire coffee. We had some family friends way back when who made their coffee that way, but they skipped the paper towel step. It was horrible coffee.

The paper towel step is really not to be skipped :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Campfire coffee. We had some family friends way back when who made their coffee that way, but they skipped the paper towel step. It was horrible coffee.

We did that for years when on canoe trips. Seemed fine then. Just let it sit for a few minutes and most of the grounds settled. Dad would trickle a little cold water into the pot in a circle. Said the cold water sinking would take the grounds down too. Was never sure on that. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Anomaly2 said:

We have both a mocha pot (Bialetti to some-- but Bialetti are often made of some unknowable aluminum alloy like stuff..) and a Kamira on the boat. But the Kamira is really the tool of choice. 

Didn't know about the Kamira.. Looking that up. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Anomaly2 said:

We have both a mocha pot (Bialetti to some-- but Bialetti are often made of some unknowable aluminum alloy like stuff..) and a Kamira on the boat. But the Kamira is really the tool of choice. 

IMG_0047.JPG

Kamira.jpg

What is this!!! How come I've never seen one. Does it make a decent espresso? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do french press as well.  Bialetti Brikka is really what you want for a mocha pot - has a little weight on the tube to pressurize the steam a bit as it goes through the grounds to make it more like an expresso.  Too fussy for me for the boat though, since I'm usually using pre-ground (ugh) coffee.  

Another alternative if you want even simpler is to go Turkish coffee - it's a really fine grind like flour, and it settles on the bottom of the cup.  So you just pour boiling water into the cup with a couple spoons of the coffee, then let it sit and drink.  Strong and delicious, even if not fresh ground.  Way better than "campfire coffee" or paper towel filters.  What are we, animals?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Hey, I have and love my Moccha pot. :)

I'm having trouble getting the "espume" when making Cuban coffee. Any tips?

I should have said, some 'mericuns', of which we have quite a few,.... :) 

 

I suppose if you let the steam spit through a bit longer you might add to the crema. But you can't let it steam long as that won't help the brew.

 

I haven't taken to grinding on the boat. I grind enough fresh beans at home (my favorite come from Sahadi's in Brooklyn NY.) or grind a whole pound at the store for a week. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've created a little cafe in my lazarette with one of these:

image.png.afa1755b05accc9b490b365d0c233ce3.png

Sorry - we just had a snowstorm and a 23 hour power outage. I'm a little giddy now that I have all my toys back.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Chemex.  Brews a fantastic pot of coffee.  Of course you need to be careful about the glass cone, but the flavor is worth it.  French presses, in addition to the aforementioned cleaning hassle, there have been studies that link the use of a French press with some types of heart disease.  Using a drip or pour over with a good filter has the opposite effect.  My understanding is that this  is because you don't filter out a lot of th oils that end up in a french press coffee (ever noticed that rainbow like gloss in a french press coffee?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DDW said:

Atomic Coffee maker. Portofilter and steamer on the stovetop. 

Es65Hbg.jpg

I'm  checking it out online. What's the verdict: Close espresso? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

What is this!!! How come I've never seen one. Does it make a decent espresso? 

Kamira, made by Nino— backyard inventor in Sicily.

We bought five in his first year, my wife called and talked to him, asked him about being his US distributor. He said it was too soon, was focused on sales in Italy. A year later, we were with one of my wife’s good friends- a guy from Sicily who now lives in Minn. We show him a Kamira, tell him the distributor plan, ask him to go visit Nino when he goes to visit family in Sicily. He’s up for it- a partnership is quickly arranged over several bottles of wine. Then... he Googles “Kamira” on his phone: “ Hey, it’s on Amazon”

Sigh. I coulda been a contender. Back to the salt mines for me.

Yes, it makes lovely espresso

 

 

C4F849AA-858D-43F2-9C53-520428E0CF17.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Anomaly2 said:

Kamira, made by Nino— backyard inventor in Sicily.

We bought five in his first year, my wife called and talked to him, asked him about being his US distributor. He said it was too soon, was focused on sales in Italy. A year later, we were with one of my wife’s good friends- a guy from Sicily who now lives in Minn. We show him a Kamira, tell him the distributor plan, ask him to go visit Nino when he goes to visit family in Sicily. He’s up for it- a partnership is quickly arranged over several bottles of wine. Then... he Googles “Kamira” on his phone: “ Hey, it’s on Amazon”

Sigh. I coulda been a contender. Back to the salt mines for me.

Yes, it makes lovely espresso

 

 

C4F849AA-858D-43F2-9C53-520428E0CF17.jpeg

That is interesting, especially Sicilian back yard tech. Amazon has one listed but it's 'unavailable' at this time. What do they cost, I'll look for one.

 

I'm not put off by this review, I like a challenge:

"This unit exploded while it was making espresso and I have only had it since February 26, 2017. It broke the glass top of my new range from the explosion and bent the bottom of the unit so it was bulging out. I think the pressure release safety valve malfunctioned. The stove top is costing me $400.00 just for the new part." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, wick said:

We have used both an insulated stainless French press (4 cups-2 each) and an Aeropress 2 cups at a time into the accessory Java Jug. The jug gives you a stable pressing base, and then you add more hot water to suit the number of cups or strength. The Aeropress stores inside the jug, so it takes about the same space as the French press. 

 

I've been looking for something like the java jug for ages, thanks!

We use an aeropress when sitting around with nowhere to be, but have a stash of coffee bags for when it's all too rushed. The Robert Timms extra strong ones are an improvement over instant for minimal extra effort. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a lexan bodied french press left over from the camper that I forgot about. That may be the ticket, I really hate glass on a boat for anything. I've abandoned the Kuerig idea, I do like the variety of flavors, zero washing out and the little pods are recyclable here, but its another appliance to lug. I did find an induction one burner electric stove so if im at the dock i'll boil a kettle on it. 

If the dock has electricity its on them, I have to pay for the propane. 

I really like the idea of a thermal carafe french press, that seems handy for a few reasons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bialetti type work really well over a camping gas stove - very efficient with fuel. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have both a bialetti and a ss percolator on board with a hand-crank grinder.  The problem with the bialetti is that it's a real pain to re-set it for another round, if needed.  (Also need to keep a spare gasket on board...) Most often, I've just been using the percolator.  

Actually, lately I've gone over to the other side and just make a big pot of tea - have some of it hot in the morning and the rest cold with dinner.  Usually half black half herbal.  

Maybe there will be more time to mess around with coffee when I'm retired.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An italian percolator and already ground up coffee. It is fairly safe and foolproof even at sea.

s-l1000.jpg&q=0&b=1&p=0&a=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aeropress and a Porlex grinder (stainless, ceramic burr).  Life is too short to fuck around with crappy coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have Bialettis in various sizes. One was my mother's. They are simple and deliver a good coffee, provided you use the right coffee and decent water. Here's a couple of ULBs (Ultra Large Bialetti) my wife spotted in Verona a couple fo years ago:

image.thumb.png.0295da3714955e775235d9984b6248a1.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, toddster said:

I have both a bialetti and a ss percolator on board with a hand-crank grinder.  The problem with the bialetti is that it's a real pain to re-set it for another round, if needed.  (Also need to keep a spare gasket on board...) Most often, I've just been using the percolator.  

Actually, lately I've gone over to the other side and just make a big pot of tea - have some of it hot in the morning and the rest cold with dinner.  Usually half black half herbal.  

Maybe there will be more time to mess around with coffee when I'm retired.  

I have to say that hot tea was lovely on the mid watch, but on an empty stomach it gave me a belly ache.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Instant coffee. I regret each sip, but it’s safer/easier in sporty conditions.

Actually, usual is a French press first thing in the morning with Mrs HFC - I like to plunger. Then it’s time for a coffee in a similar style. ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm  checking it out online. What's the verdict: Close espresso? 

It is a replica of the original one made in Italy in the 50s. Produced in Taiwan and sold by someone, I'll have to look that up. Ah, here it is. There is a very high tech improved version made in Australia I think, but out of my price range. 

It doesn't develop enough pressure to do true espresso (which aficionados will say takes 14 bars or so) but it's closer than a mocha pot or the Bellman or any of the other percolator types. On the Atomic, the grind and tamp makes a big and sensitive difference - you need it to develop the maximum pressure before the release blows and you get nothing. That done, you can get a decent double or triple shot out of it (including la creama), then steam the milk.  I generally get the Italian Roast from Starbucks (don't start on me....) and have them grind it with the machine set on 1.5 (near Turkish grind). That keeps the pressure up but is still porous enough to get a shot. There are a few other tricks if you get one. 

I have the Bellman, a couple of the mocha pots including the latte version, and a few other gadgets. The Atomic is the stovetop solution I've settled on, one in the sailboat, one in the camper. In the powerboat I just have a countertop 110V espresso machine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's critical that you use Starbuck's coffee, n'est-ce pas?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bull City said:

I've created a little cafe in my lazarette with one of these:

image.png.afa1755b05accc9b490b365d0c233ce3.png

Sorry - we just had a snowstorm and a 23 hour power outage. I'm a little giddy now that I have all my toys back.

Love mine!  But a touch big and demanding for the galley.... drat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of coffee, last night I came across a review of the brew at the Holiday Inn breakfast bar: "It tasted like polluted river water strained through a dirty diaper."  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two peripheral advantages to using a French Press, esp. advantageous in cold climates:

  1. Using hot water to rinse metal press filter and cover of dish detergent while pre-heating it and
  2. Using hot water to pre-heat cup(s) while coffee steeps for ~5 minutes.

Being able to boil water has many benefits.  Like hot oatmeal and noodles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moka Pot and Lavazza

Just look at my Avatar

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bull City said:

It's critical that you use Starbuck's coffee, n'est-ce pas?

No - but it is critical that you get the grind right, which makes purchasing ground while traveling sometimes a shot in the dark. Except at Starbucks, the McDonalds of the coffee industry. Same coffee (or burgers) no matter where in the world you walk in the door. Mediocre generally, but  consistently so. Starbucks offers about 20 different roasts, a few of them not bad at all. If you carried your own grinder, then any bean would do.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Anomaly2 said:

We have both a mocha pot (Bialetti to some-- but Bialetti are often made of some unknowable aluminum alloy like stuff..) and a Kamira on the boat. But the Kamira is really the tool of choice. 

IMG_0047.JPG

Kamira.jpg

That bottom one looks like a wee doggie business....?   Thaaaat's noot coffee......

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jammer Six said:

I've had bad coffee from a Starbuck's in London.

That's a fucken surprise, I bet you had bad sex in the Playboy Mansion.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without malice it is a wee bit strange to lob into a thread about North Americans and coffee, just sayin. You were the last ones on board the real coffee train. Having said that some nice coffee methods in here. Maybe there is hope.

Can you please pass the grey poopon Woody...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've happily used the Melitta pour over system aboard for many years, and recently switched to a ceramic dripper. Also have a Chemex, which is great but it's kind of bulky, and I fear for it getting broken when off duty, so it's been moved ashore. Boil water in a SS teapot (so you can make tea and/or coffee), run a grinder from a small invertor, grind enough (during the day, when nobody is sleeping) for a couple mornings and keep them in a nifty old Gevalia ceramic canister, with a snug sealing lid. Finding decent beans in the boonies is getting easier - using water from aluminum tanks onboard is verboten. You can make shitty coffee with good ingredients, but it's impossible to make good coffee if you start with crap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Percolator for bulk coffee in the morning, an Alessi (Italian) coffee maker for my own strong, black cup. Always fresh-ground coffee, using a Braun grinder - the main reason I have an inverter. For tea, there is a SS kettle and a proper ceramic tea pot. Coffee, like food, always tastes better on the boat or by a campfire.

Alessi.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, HFC Hunter said:

Instant coffee. I regret each sip, but it’s safer/easier in sporty conditions.

Actually, usual is a French press first thing in the morning with Mrs HFC - I like to plunger. Then it’s time for a coffee in a similar style. ;)

Ah, when bouncy conditions or time constraints demand instant coffee, I've found Starbuck's VIA Italian blend to be satisfactory.

It's a bit heretical...kind of like letting my Italian grandmother find out that I've used Prego jarred pasta sauce.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Panoramix said:

An italian percolator and already ground up coffee. It is fairly safe and foolproof even at sea.

s-l1000.jpg&q=0&b=1&p=0&a=1

Makes good coffee. However the material it is made of does not take a thread well and if you use it a lot the thread fails and it is landfill. Over the years I have had 3 - none lasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Jammer Six said:

I've had bad coffee from a Starbuck's in London.

I avoid Starbuck's unless I am about to fall over dead from caffeine withdrawal. Their mocha type drinks taste like pure sugar and almost all of their beans taste like a coal ash dump :o If I have no choice, their breakfast blend beans are tolerable. I may be spoiled, we have some superb local roasters B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been trying this place: www.blackriflecoffee.com

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ah, when bouncy conditions or time constraints demand instant coffee, I've found Starbuck's VIA Italian blend to be satisfactory.

It's a bit heretical...kind of like letting my Italian grandmother find out that I've used Prego jarred pasta sauce.

Prior to discovering the Aeropress, I used whatever Starbucks dark roast VIA I could get, either Italian or French, for hiking or sporty sailing for solo.   Bulk coffee for racing was a good sized old school stove top percolator (Coffee for 17).

I am learning quite a bit from this thread for some fun alternatives for brewing more than 1-4 shots(cups) with the Aero and Megabulk production with a 64oz perc.

- Stumbling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found whole latte love to be a good source for hardware and beans.

For transportable / stove top I like:

bellman-stovetop-cappuccino-and-espresso
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since you not going to be reading your newspaper or bathing I’d suggest these.

Life is too short to worry about good coffee on board. Stir this crap into hot water and suck it up black. 

Next question...

287C3E0E-E0B6-48E8-8CBA-90FCB40F659C.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Since you not going to be reading your newspaper or bathing I’d suggest these.

Life is too short to worry about good coffee on board. Stir this crap into hot water and suck it up black. 

Next question...

287C3E0E-E0B6-48E8-8CBA-90FCB40F659C.jpeg

I just threw up a little in my mouth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Since you not going to be reading your newspaper or bathing I’d suggest these.

Life is too short to worry about good coffee on board. Stir this crap into hot water and suck it up black. 

Next question...

287C3E0E-E0B6-48E8-8CBA-90FCB40F659C.jpeg

 

Impressive. You managed to cram nearly every shittiest brand of coffee all into a single photo. I think the only thing you're missing, is Maxwell House regular drip.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, KC375 said:

I've found whole latte love to be a good source for hardware and beans.

 

For transportable / stove top I like:

 

 

bellman-stovetop-cappuccino-and-espresso

That looks pretty cool, but ~10 minutes to make a coffee (starting with pre-boiled water):

Is that typical of stovetop espresso machines to get the pressure correct?  If so I'll stick with the fast and no cleanup Aeropress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

My son gave me a Bialetti Italian coffee maker a few years ago. These typical Italian coffee makers (there are several makes) are mistaken as Espresso makers. You can't make Espresso without high pressure. But they work on a similar principle in that as water boils in the lower chamber, it is forced up through a second chamber, which holds ground coffee, and then up a pipe to a third chamber, which collects the brewed coffee. Not a percolater, the steaming water only travels through the coffee grounds once, and it's done. 

If you like a strong brew with no grounds, you might like one.

 

But I think they are particularly well suited to a small galley. You only want a small burner and low flame at that. There is nothing to break, all SS, easy to clean but in fact you only need to rap the coffee basket and clear it, and rinse. 

Fill the bottom chamber with fresh water, the middle basket (which fits in the lower chamber) with coffee grounds, and screw the top on and put it on a small burner. 

bialetti_-jpg.155298

After a few minutes on a low burner, the brew comes up through the middle pipe and fills the upper chamber. Once it starts spitting steam, you take it off the burner. Done. 

bialetti-brewed-jpg.155299

This is what I use at home and it's brilliant. My mother in law gave us one a few years ago and ours has been used at least a thousand times. It make good coffee (I just had a sip to make sure). I don't take it on the boat because my current boat is a tiny and it takes a bit of water to clean it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 

Impressive. You managed to cram nearly every shittiest brand of coffee all into a single photo. I think the only thing you're missing, is Maxwell House regular drip.

I camped with a friend about 10 years ago. 

He brought instant, I brought my French press. Couldn’t believe he didn’t want fresh coffee out in the great outdoors.

But we both ate mre’s the night before...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TQA said:

Makes good coffee. However the material it is made of does not take a thread well and if you use it a lot the thread fails and it is landfill. Over the years I have had 3 - none lasted.

There are lot of similar looking ones, there is one in my Dad's boat which is probably about 20 years old!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

I camped with a friend about 10 years ago. 

He brought instant, I brought my French press. Couldn’t believe he didn’t want fresh coffee out in the great outdoors.

But we both ate mre’s the night before...

Earlier this year, some of my AirBnB guests, after being served fresh-ground pretty-decent roast every morning, presented me with a can of Folgers upon their departure.  I’m not sure if they were trying to make some kind of point or just being clueless.

But... now what do I do with it?  It’s at risk of becoming a permanent fixture in the pantry.  Wonder if it’s safe to spread that stuff directly in the garden?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep it on hand, there's no accounting for taste. My in-laws always shun our fresh-ground roast coffee for Nescafe. If they don't want my expensive beans, all the more for me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

have a bialetti and its ok ,  find they go fusty and taint the coffee  a bit . now use a nanopresso its way better than an aeropresso and take it everywhere not just on the boat and usually use a jetboil to heat the water real quick.

                                                                                         https://www.wacaco.com/pages/nanopresso

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, toddster said:

Earlier this year, some of my AirBnB guests, after being served fresh-ground pretty-decent roast every morning, presented me with a can of Folgers upon their departure.  I’m not sure if they were trying to make some kind of point or just being clueless.

But... now what do I do with it?  It’s at risk of becoming a permanent fixture in the pantry.  Wonder if it’s safe to spread that stuff directly in the garden?  

Apparently it's a good drain cleaner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would flush it before someone thinks it’s yours.

I got spoiled a long time ago living down the street from a local roaster and getting to know them.

They roasted peanuts in the morning and coffee beans in the afternoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the bialetti is ok. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, KC375 said:

I've found whole latte love to be a good source for hardware and beans.

 

For transportable / stove top I like:

 

 

bellman-stovetop-cappuccino-and-espresso

That is the Bellman. I have a couple of them. It was the best choice of the percolator types, because you can steam the milk. Use to use them in both the boat and the camper before I found the Atomic. I'd sell one or both if someone wants to try one. 

To be clear, it is a single pass percolator type machine. Grounds go in a basket up at the top, boiling water percolates through and out the nozzle. No pressure at all. The other downside is when you are finished the whole thing has coffee and coffee grounds in it, making clean up a chore. The Atomic generates some pressure and forces water through the portofilter like a real espresso machine. The higher the pressure you can achieve the better. I'd like to adapt one of the pressure regulating portofilters to it, as many of the newer countertop machines use, but that project is well down on my priority list. The grounds and cleanup are confined to the portofilter. 

I also have a couple of mocha pots, and some backpacker type single pass percolator "espresso" devices. Including this Mukka Espresso, which produces the coffee and steams the milk automatically. Unfortunately it will only do one at a time and my wife won't have it, also the coffee is percolated single pass and again the clean up required is substantial.

The improved Australian version of the Atomic is shown here. When it came out, I saw it but the $900 price tag put it a little out of the impulse buy category. In looking for it, I ran across it again, or what it has become. Now called the Little Guy, and only $700 AUS - maybe I should take a flier on that one. It is an updated interpretation of the original Giordano Robbiati design (while the La Sorrentina is a straight out copy), but this time in stainless steel with the look (and price) of high quality. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites