sailorman44

Are we(racing sailors) a culture of cheaters?

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"If you aren't cheating you aren't trying hard enough" 
 
How often have I seen those words on these pages? Headlines in the news about sports cheating, Tour de France, Olympics, Americas Cup, J-70 Nationals.
 
PHRF seems to think so as their second most important activity seems to be foiling cheaters. Their attitude is punitive rather than supportive.
 
When I look at my sailing community, Wednesday night series, ECSA weekend races, and Off Soundings I don't see rampart cheating.
 
So, are we a culture of cheaters?
 

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Allegations are made all of the time, you never see anyone protest it and prove it.  Why don't they protest it?  Is it just easier to use this as an excuse why they beat you?

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Look no further than the White House were Person of Interest #1 resides.  He got there by a crooked election, rigged by a century-long arch-enemy but garnered 48% of popular vote.  I think that pretty clearly answers your question.  (first, let me say Scooter put the words in my fingertips and second, I know, I know, take it to PA).

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8 minutes ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

Allegations are made all of the time, you never see anyone protest it and prove it.  Why don't they protest it?  Is it just easier to use this as an excuse why they beat you?

It's also a question of procedure.   To "protest" a boat, and therefore a person, in PHRF you will be responsible for costs if you are wrong, you will have to do your own invasive investigating, and you have the burden of proof without support of the organization.   It's about as simple as any lawsuit, therefore the best way to win is not to start the suit.   

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There may be a few individual cheats but that does not make it a culture.

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having just watched a high school sailing coach coach his kids to cheat, then lie when confronted about it ("the PRO pre-approved it", the PRO later denied this claim) and given the courtesy chance to withdraw from the race (a withdraw that wouldn't have changed the outcome of the regatta), I say yes there are cheaters among us. 

So yes, we have some people actively cheating and promoting it with our youngest sailors.  

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There are guys who just don't know the rules

 

There are guys who streeeetch things a bit

 

and then there are cheaters (J70 class has been a perfect example although they seem to be cleaner this year).

 

 

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37 minutes ago, ctdriver said:

having just watched a high school sailing coach coach his kids to cheat, then lie when confronted about it ("the PRO pre-approved it", the PRO later denied this claim) and given the courtesy chance to withdraw from the race (a withdraw that wouldn't have changed the outcome of the regatta), I say yes there are cheaters among us. 

So yes, we have some people actively cheating and promoting it with our youngest sailors.  

And therein lies the problem of pros and amateurs. The coach is, in all likelihood, being paid. He’s looking for his next bigger payday, which is going to based on how much his team wins. 

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Are we talking about actual cheaters (those who broke the rules), or are we talking about "cheaters" (those who take advantage of loop holes, pushing the limits)?

Kind of like taxes.  Some people accuse people of cheating on their taxes just cause they took advantage of some loop hole or deficiency in the rules.  But, are they actually cheating?

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I remember a talk Buddy Melges did when he was raising money for Heart of America.  He had just won the USYRU sportsmanship trophy and someone congratulated him on it, and he said "aw shucks, sportsmanship is nothing but cheatin' fair".

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There is not a simple answer to your question.

My granddaughter's sailing coaches tell their kids over, and over no ooching, no pumping, no sculling. I tell her it's better to learn those techniques, she may be in the SSL someday. 

The history of sailing has been firstly pirating, win at all cost, or die. Yachting is an offshoot of that tradition and philosophy. It's natural that any athletic, competitive situation the rules will be pushed to the breaking point. What has become the norm is a mutual agreement among competitors to follow guidelines to promote a fair contest. Rules will be broken. 

You cannot blame our current presidential administration for problems with society. The opposite is truer. Obviously a system to hold people accountable is what is needed, for our sport, our nation, or it becomes more and more like Russia. Russia is a cheating society, and has been called out, held to account for altering the human body, which is a big health risk, just to win competitive contests. Countries other than Russia, and people do that too. 

Also this question has nothing to do with "pro" vs "amateur". Amateur, and corinthian yachtsmen are snowflakes, and need to feel entitled to participate. We all need those people, and other enthusiasts in our sport to fill the ranks. That does not change their status as "exceptional". Just as we need to provide platforms for other "exceptional" people in society. 

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18 minutes ago, jhc said:

There is not a simple answer to your question.

My granddaughter's sailing coaches tell their kids over, and over no ooching, no pumping, no sculling. I tell her it's better to learn those techniques, she may be in the SSL someday. 

The history of sailing has been firstly pirating, win at all cost, or die. Yachting is an offshoot of that tradition and philosophy. It's natural that any athletic, competitive situation the rules will be pushed to the breaking point. What has become the norm is a mutual agreement among competitors to follow guidelines to promote a fair contest. Rules will be broken. 

You cannot blame our current presidential administration for problems with society. The opposite is truer. Obviously a system to hold people accountable is what is needed, for our sport, our nation, or it becomes more and more like Russia. Russia is a cheating society, and has been called out, held to account for altering the human body, which is a big health risk, just to win competitive contests. Countries other than Russia, and people do that too. 

Also this question has nothing to do with "pro" vs "amateur". Amateur, and corinthian yachtsmen are snowflakes, and need to feel entitled to participate. We all need those people, and other enthusiasts in our sport to fill the ranks. That does not change their status as "exceptional". Just as we need to provide platforms for other "exceptional" people in society. 

No sculling when the oscar flag is up ;)

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3 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

No worse than golfers.

i thought that was just winter rules !

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3 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Are we talking about actual cheaters (those who broke the rules), or are we talking about "cheaters" (those who take advantage of loop holes, pushing the limits)?

Kind of like taxes.  Some people accuse people of cheating on their taxes just cause they took advantage of some loop hole or deficiency in the rules.  But, are they actually cheating?

 

Some might say it is your patriotic duty to pay as little in taxes as legally possible.. not cheat.  Hard to look at tax laws and not think this thing is designed to be a game.  

One of the things I have always appreciated about sailing is that this is one of the few places where the design safety factor is often less than 1:1.  You just don't get to push limits like that in most other things (and rightfully so, but hey breaking things is fun sometimes if not a little on the expensive side).  

So playing the game and pushing the limits... how do you know what the limits are if they don't get occasionally broken?  Call it cheating if you must my take is the community pretty much takes care of that.  I am not close enough to racing currently to be sure but what little I have been involved in the past in has revealed a tight knit and welcoming, yet competitive community of people pushing boundaries and limits in sometimes very new and creative ways.  Cheating implies dishonesty. Dishonesty is in a cultural context.  Is it the culture to be dishonest by default?  To find better ways to be dishonest? God I hope not.  

Exploring the limits? 

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How about yelling bs "rule" numbers and hails to intimidate the newbies at mark roundings?  That's cheating, and it happens all the damn time.  How about "not hearing" calls for room or "up" at the line?  Cheating, and it happens all the time.  I gave up course racing a few years ago because of the open cheating on the course, the the straight-faced lying in the protest room, and the drunken confrontations in the club bar.  Maybe I've just had bad luck with the fleets I've sailed in.  Back in the day, I sailed out of a club where everyone cheated, in part because nobody really knew the rules.  I got a ride on a boat with a skipper who'd coached for years for a top college team.  He proceeded to sail right to the bleeding edge of the rules and protest every single infraction.  All legit--and it got him driven out of the club and killed racing for a decade there.

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I know at our sailing school Cheating is definately not taught, But the rules are. If someone is seen to be consistantly cheating then someone will protest them. 

If someone starts calling false rules then that is an offence in itself (used to be called ungentlemanly conduct) and they can be protested out

Years ago on a day when the the wind stopped, one class of dinghies promptly roll tacked their way through the fleet and all of them got protested out..

I also know that when I'm one of the many officiating on the 3 Rivers Race we are asked to keep an eye out for anyone cheating... Anyone caught or there is sufficient evidence to believe they were cheating will not be invited to race again

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using loop holes in the rules is not cheating, that's optimizing. Its up to the organizing body to close said loopholes. When you add often large amounts of money to sport there is incentive for actual cheating, and its in EVERY sport, dope in cycling and track, oversized goalie pads in the NHL, too much pine tar on a MLB bat. everywhere.

WE see it almost annually in PHRF LO, oversized spinakker ( it was borrowed , we had no idea....) , new main added with 4-5" added to the foot, fixed prop changed for folder and un reported. All the cushions at home in the garage. If you want a $3.00 flag that bad, go ahead

There is lots of room for cheating in Corinithian sport

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Competition is always about maximizing your own situational opportunities for success. So, the mentality of seeking an unfair advantage (and Mark Donohue's book "The Unfair Advantage" is a very good read, btw) is kind of baked into the cookie. But if you figure out a way to do something advantageous first (i.e., your competitors are not doing it) and it is not banned by the rules, then you have achieved the "cheatin' fair" from the Buddy Melges quote above. And no, I would not classify that as cheating, unless you surreptitiously continue the practice after the powers in charge of your sport ban it.

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Shouldn't this thread be merged with the Phrf Clown thread ?  Macro versus micro ?   Also cheating is a muggs game as participants recognize it when it happens regardless of protests,   and all it takes is one fuck up to wipe out the sought after benefit .   Usually cheaters are inept by definition and the fuck ups will bring them down.

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21 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

No worse than golfers.

That's a low bar. The sport is nothing if it cannot retain its corinthian roots. 

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My experience is of witnessing a paid for coach in the UK Optimist class telling a kid under his tutelage being told to deny everything in the protest room.  Appalling conduct .  He remains active coaching kids today and should not be.  

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Pushing limits is the game, it's good for competition. There is nothing wrong with knowing limits as long as exploits are curbed.

Cheating? Rampant in ECSA, widespread? No but that is too broad a stroke using the term cheating.

 Is it cheating to apply for a rating before completing an extensive resto/mod? Is it cheating to hold off installing a keel until cert has been issued? Or is it intent to deceive?

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18 hours ago, Plausible said:

Shouldn't this thread be merged with the Phrf Clown thread ?  Macro versus micro ?   Also cheating is a muggs game as participants recognize it when it happens regardless of protests,   and all it takes is one fuck up to wipe out the sought after benefit .   Usually cheaters are inept by definition and the fuck ups will bring them down.

I started this thread because of what I was seeing on the "PHRF Clowns" thread. The discussion was good and I didn't want to change the direction. I had in mind the kind of cheating that the PHRF committee is involved with; changes to the physical boat. Then there is the other kind of cheating that takes place on the race course and is the preview of the other racers and the protest committee.

Cheating on the race course is visible and hard to get away with. People see  even though they don't protest and the cheaters reputation is made.
 
Changes to a boat are more subtle not so noticeable. 

 

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5 minutes ago, sailorman44 said:

I started this thread because of what I was seeing on the "PHRF Clowns" thread. The discussion was good and I didn't want to change the direction. I had in mind the kind of cheating that the PHRF committee is involved with; changes to the physical boat. Then there is the other kind of cheating that takes place on the race course and is the preview of the other racers and the protest committee.

Cheating on the race course is visible and hard to get away with. People see  even though they don't protest and the cheaters reputation is made.
 
Changes to a boat are more subtle not so noticeable. 

 

When a phrf board member gets an unwarranted rating adjustment is that cheating?

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35 minutes ago, PeterRoss said:

Cheating? Rampant in ECSA, widespread? No but that is too broad a stroke using the term cheating.

Go back and look at the original post; I said I do not see rampart cheating in my local area.

39 minutes ago, PeterRoss said:

 Is it cheating to apply for a rating before completing an extensive resto/mod? Is it cheating to hold off installing a keel until cert has been issued? Or is it intent to deceive?

Yes it is cheating not to tell the handicap committee about a mod as soon as it happens. However I can understand why someone would do it.  
 
So you wait to see if the modification is effective, 9 times out of 10 there is no noticeable improvement in performance. If you tell PHRF beforehand they will slap such a heavy penalty on you that you will be discouraged from doing it.
 
PHRF is so anti innovation that they punish any and all modifications.  PHRF is sure that any change it your boat is to make it go faster.  If you attached a bucket to your keel they would punish you for it.
 
Reminds me of the story about the guy that was thinking of replacing his too small rudder with a larger one. He asked PHRF if there would be a penalty. They said yes, the larger rudder provided more control so CHANGED his rating by -9 sec. He replied NO, NO, you don't understand, I was just asking, I have the small rudder. PHRF said the small rudder has less wetted surface and drag therefore they changed his rating by -9 sec.
 
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4 hours ago, sailorman44 said:

PHRF is so anti innovation that they punish any and all modifications. 

Not true.  If a boat like an FT10 changes their rudder to one that is much better they don't get hit at all, if there are FT10 owners on the Board.

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Out of curiosity why do people race phrf in the first place ?   It is a subjective rating and you can achieve the same racing result by just sailing the course and  having fun whilst not registering.   They cannot stop you as the course is public property and not closed by authoritative fiat with guns.   All the angst on this page.    A better question would be  " are racers all so lonely they need phrf to socialize ? " ....  We used to race our boats all the time on an ad hoc basis and then just yell about perceived subjective results at the bar.   Far more social and definitely more fun.   True Corinthian .    Its like pickup hockey versus organized hockey.   Pickup is much more fun.

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You haven't won the race, if in winning the race you have lost the respect of your competitors ....and you have not won the race if you lose your own self respect.

It has never been a grey area for me. I have never been interested in cheating...and if I cheat accidentally, I retire.

Many many years ago, in a previous century,  my team was competing in the J24 DownEast regatta. We had prepped our boat to perfection abiding by class rules. We sailed a very good regatta and at the end of the last day, we had clawed our way up to third place, our first time on the podium at a decent sized regatta. I think Terry H had won but I may be wrong about that. We came ashore and walked up to my truck so that I could unlock the tailgate to start bringing gear from the boat. I opened the tailgate and we stopped dead in our tracks, with jaws dropped. There, staring at us, was the water container required to be carried on board when racing by J24 rules. I looked at my crew and it was clear to all of us what we were going to do. I gave them all a hug or a handshake, then I walked over to the Protest Committee and informed them that we were retiring after finishing.

What we had as a team gave us more pride than any trophy ever will, before or since.

That group of guys and one girl set a standard for me that I have tried to live by ever since then.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 12/13/2018 at 12:02 AM, The great unwashed said:

How about yelling bs "rule" numbers and hails to intimidate the newbies at mark roundings?  That's cheating, and it happens all the damn time.  How about "not hearing" calls for room or "up" at the line?  Cheating, and it happens all the time.  I gave up course racing a few years ago because of the open cheating on the course, the the straight-faced lying in the protest room, and the drunken confrontations in the club bar.  Maybe I've just had bad luck with the fleets I've sailed in.  Back in the day, I sailed out of a club where everyone cheated, in part because nobody really knew the rules.  I got a ride on a boat with a skipper who'd coached for years for a top college team.  He proceeded to sail right to the bleeding edge of the rules and protest every single infraction.  All legit--and it got him driven out of the club and killed racing for a decade there.

I see you've been racing J24s...

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39 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

You haven't won the race, if in winning the race you have lost the respect of your competitors ....and you have not won the race if you lose your own self respect.

It has never been a grey area for me. I have never been interested in cheating...and if I cheat accidentally, I retire.

Many many years ago, in a previous century,  my team was competing in the J24 DownEast regatta. We had prepped our boat to perfection abiding by class rules. We sailed a very good regatta and at the end of the last day, we had clawed our way up to third place, our first time on the podium at a decent sized regatta. I think Terry H had won but I may be wrong about that. We came ashore and walked up to my truck so that I could unlock the tailgate to start bringing gear from the boat. I opened the tailgate and we stopped dead in our tracks, with jaws dropped. There, staring at us, was the water container required to be carried on board when racing by J24 rules. I looked at my crew and it was clear to all of us what we were going to do. I gave them all a hug or a handshake, then I walked over to the Protest Committee and informed them that we were retiring after finishing.

What we had as a team gave us more pride than any trophy ever will, before or since.

That group of guys and one girl set a standard for me that I have tried to live by ever since then.

Well said. I hope I would have done the same.

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On 12/12/2018 at 4:09 PM, sailorman44 said:

So, are we a culture of cheaters?

no...i fucking hate cheaters...there is no honor in cheating 

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4 hours ago, Plausible said:

Out of curiosity why do people race phrf in the first place ?   

Probably because we were too dumb to foresee what we were getting into.

You buy a boat and learn to sail. Then you think that racing looks like fun and would make sailing more interesting. When you bought your boat you didn't buy it with racing in mind. When you started racing you were too dumb to realize you boat wasn't that good a race boat. But PHRF will handicap it to level the playing field. Right! By the time you become a good enough racer to realize that your boat isn't really designed for racing it's too late. You own the boat and like it and probably can't afford to sell it and get a more appropriate boat. You make the best of the situation and bitch about PHRF.
 
With 20-20 hindsight you could have bought a one design boat and saved yourself all the angst.
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At our little club - where junior sailing is the cornerstone - we have a banner on permanent display that reflects the values of the membership.

It is a quote from the Great Dane - Paul Elvstrom:

“You haven't won if, in doing so, you have lost the respect of your competitors.”

That is the beginning and the end of it.

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4 hours ago, dacapo said:

no...i fucking hate cheaters...there is no honor in cheating 

Well of course not - but the narcissists do not care about honor. 

In fact, when you even endeavor to discuss it with them, you get the ol' 1,000 yard stare. 

But most racers are not of that Ilk, fortunately. 

Otherwise the sport could not exist. 

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2 hours ago, sailorman44 said:

Probably because we were too dumb to foresee what we were getting into.

You buy a boat and learn to sail ..... and bitch about PHRF.
 
With 20-20 hindsight you could have bought a power boat and saved yourself all the angst.

FIFY

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7 hours ago, Mambo Kings said:

You haven't won the race, if in winning the race you have lost the respect of your competitors ....and you have not won the race if you lose your own self respect.

It has never been a grey area for me. I have never been interested in cheating...and if I cheat accidentally, I retire.

Many many years ago, in a previous century,  my team was competing in the J24 DownEast regatta. We had prepped our boat to perfection abiding by class rules. We sailed a very good regatta and at the end of the last day, we had clawed our way up to third place, our first time on the podium at a decent sized regatta. I think Terry H had won but I may be wrong about that. We came ashore and walked up to my truck so that I could unlock the tailgate to start bringing gear from the boat. I opened the tailgate and we stopped dead in our tracks, with jaws dropped. There, staring at us, was the water container required to be carried on board when racing by J24 rules. I looked at my crew and it was clear to all of us what we were going to do. I gave them all a hug or a handshake, then I walked over to the Protest Committee and informed them that we were retiring after finishing.

What we had as a team gave us more pride than any trophy ever will, before or since.

That group of guys and one girl set a standard for me that I have tried to live by ever since then.

 

 

 

 

 

Bravo, sir. I go back regularly to Steve Carell's speech near the end of "The Big Short" were he talks about how fraud and cheating never used to work out long term, but now does. I work in an industry where this is a commonplace philosophy, and it kills a small piece of my soul every year. 

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Rules are there to limit cheating. 

The real crime is when the rules are not enforced.

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What always amazes me is when you consider that in big boat racing the whole crew would need to be onboard with an act of cheating.

I sort of find that unfathomable. Hell they are only pickle dishes.

I also find it incredible that some crews put up with an abusive owner. Whole other story but I just cannot understand how many will get right back on the boat with a owner that abuses them.

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I think the answer is  " Myers " ..... prime example......but we are not allowed to print or say that name on this Forum.    Therefore it is not said and we will not talk about it for fear of instant flick ......  that's another way to lose part of your soul every year......

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5 hours ago, BillDBastard said:

What always amazes me is when you consider that in big boat racing the whole crew would need to be onboard with an act of cheating.

I sort of find that unfathomable. Hell they are only pickle dishes.

I also find it incredible that some crews put up with an abusive owner. Whole other story but I just cannot understand how many will get right back on the boat with a owner that abuses them.

Entire crew's cooperation is not required in most cases.

The pickle dish prize is an excuse used by people to excuse cheating.  What does the value of the prize have to do with anything?

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On 12/12/2018 at 4:09 PM, sailorman44 said:
"If you aren't cheating you aren't trying hard enough" 
 
How often have I seen those words on these pages? Headlines in the news about sports cheating, Tour de France, Olympics, Americas Cup, J-70 Nationals.
 
PHRF seems to think so as their second most important activity seems to be foiling cheaters. Their attitude is punitive rather than supportive.
 
When I look at my sailing community, Wednesday night series, ECSA weekend races, and Off Soundings I don't see rampart cheating.
 
So, are we a culture of cheaters?
 

You are definitely not looking hard enough! 

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On 12/12/2018 at 1:09 PM, sailorman44 said:
"So, are we a culture of cheaters?
 

No, but most definitely a culture of stretchers

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On ‎12‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 4:09 PM, sailorman44 said:
 
So, are we a culture of cheaters?
 

 

No, but we are apeople who have trouble with our typesetting. 

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From what i've seen, just the italians (when it comes to on the water seemingly completely blind and deaf)... Otherwise, nah - seems to be about the normal distribution of assholes to honest people that i've seen in most other walks of life. 

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On 12/18/2018 at 4:32 AM, Parma said:

No, but most definitely a culture of stretchers

In a class that could be built at home, the +/- dimensions were an allowance intended to cover the imperfections of the backyard.  One guy took every single + to the max and produced a boat that was visibly different to the keen observer.  Areas that were designed to be flat were curved slightly to max out the measure.

I had his arse and boat protested out.  He appealed to National level and the appeal was rejected.

Sailing provides more opportunities than most sports to cheat.  The equipment and the rules are complex and people are continually finding little gaps to explore.  They stretch it until someone stops them.

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37 minutes ago, random said:

In a class that could be built at home, the +/- dimensions were an allowance intended to cover the imperfections of the backyard.  One guy took every single + to the max and produced a boat that was visibly different to the keen observer.  Areas that were designed to be flat were curved slightly to max out the measure.

I had his arse and boat protested out.  He appealed to National level and the appeal was rejected.

Sailing provides more opportunities than most sports to cheat.  The equipment and the rules are complex and people are continually finding little gaps to explore.  They stretch it until someone stops them.

It sound like you must have left something out of the story,  because what you appear to be saying is that a boat that measured in within allowances (tolerances) okay was deemed to be not okay.

Or does that class somehow divine the intent of the builder and that somewhere in the class rules it says something to the effect of "intent counts in the matter of allowances"

I think most people would call what that guy did optimizing within the rules.

 

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Where's that article about J/70's in asia which were penalized for intentionally breaking class rules for using sprits to try and get mark room?

we basically have to deal with a fleet who doesn't think protests from our fleet count.. 

 

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On 12/12/2018 at 10:20 PM, Timmy Time said:

Ask the Wild Oats XI guys...

... again ...

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On 12/12/2018 at 3:07 PM, ctdriver said:

having just watched a high school sailing coach coach his kids to cheat, then lie when confronted about it ("the PRO pre-approved it", the PRO later denied this claim) and given the courtesy chance to withdraw from the race (a withdraw that wouldn't have changed the outcome of the regatta), I say yes there are cheaters among us. 

So yes, we have some people actively cheating and promoting it with our youngest sailors.  

That coach should not be coaching at all.

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7 hours ago, Khegstrom@shaw.ca said:

That coach should not be coaching at all.

Completely agree - if I had time I’d educate the parents on the other team - but they are mostly not sailors (have no clue about rules) and love “their guy” - it’s hard to have those conversations.

if I really had time and a few willing witnesses I’d put him up for a 69 - his behavior was that offensive.

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On 12/13/2018 at 4:20 PM, Timmy Time said:

Ask the Wild Oats XI guys...

Dec 13 post date .................... 

 

want to tell me tomorrows lottery numbers please . ;)

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On 12/12/2018 at 8:19 PM, jhc said:

There is not a simple answer to your question.

My granddaughter's sailing coaches tell their kids over, and over no ooching, no pumping, no sculling. I tell her it's better to learn those techniques, she may be in the SSL someday. 

The history of sailing has been firstly pirating, win at all cost, or die. Yachting is an offshoot of that tradition and philosophy. It's natural that any athletic, competitive situation the rules will be pushed to the breaking point. What has become the norm is a mutual agreement among competitors to follow guidelines to promote a fair contest. Rules will be broken. 

You cannot blame our current presidential administration for problems with society. The opposite is truer. Obviously a system to hold people accountable is what is needed, for our sport, our nation, or it becomes more and more like Russia. Russia is a cheating society, and has been called out, held to account for altering the human body, which is a big health risk, just to win competitive contests. Countries other than Russia, and people do that too. 

Also this question has nothing to do with "pro" vs "amateur". Amateur, and corinthian yachtsmen are snowflakes, and need to feel entitled to participate. We all need those people, and other enthusiasts in our sport to fill the ranks. That does not change their status as "exceptional". Just as we need to provide platforms for other "exceptional" people in society. 

but those are all legal and valuable pieces to dinghy sailing? Are you going to tell ski racers they can't go into a tuck? Not taking up issue with you, obviously, but the coach. What is SSL? Aside from secure socket level?

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A book of rules is only part of a legal system. You need some sort of mechanism of enforcement or the rules are just funny little scratches on paper.

Sailing is about many things, to many people. If you want to play by the rules, find a group that follows the rules to the letter and protests violations. Sail strict one design. If you want something more casual, you can find that too. “Cheating” is just as much a social construction as “rules” are. Without rules, there is no cheating, by definition.

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