sea jay

Launch Operators License

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We have a small summer Sailing School. Currently the instructors (typically high school age) ferry the students to the sail boats in a power boat. It has been suggested that because they are paid by the club the instructors are required to have a Coast Guard OUPV license. We have checked with a few local yacht clubs and sailing schools and find that most of their operators do not have any CG licenses. 

The question is do you belong to or know of similar situations (yacht club launch services, sailing school transportation of students to vessels) and how are they complying with Coat Guard Regulations?

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Not much help, but about 10 years ago when I was a recent college grad working as a sailing instructor at a yacht club on LIS, we were required to go take a NY State safe boating license course.  The club hosted their own class for all the instructors at the start of the season.  I believe that the course we took was the same coursework as the OUPV, but we didn't have any seatime requirements and didn't get the OUPV - unfortunately can't really remember much beyond that other than that somewhere I have a card from it.

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Not much help, but about 10 years ago when I was a recent college grad working as a sailing instructor at a yacht club on LIS, we were required to go take a NY State safe boating license course.  The club hosted their own class for all the instructors at the start of the season.  I believe that the course we took was the same coursework as the OUPV, but we didn't have any seatime requirements and didn't get the OUPV - unfortunately can't really remember much beyond that other than that somewhere I have a card from it.

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the short answer is that if your instructors are being paid, are operating any vessel with auxiliary power, and are carrying students, then they should have at least the launch license (Restricted Masters License, because most launches carry more than 6 passengers). It's pretty easy to get, but for uninspected launches you have to be at least 17. for inspected launches it's 18.

Here's a quote:

Quote

As Newport, RI admiralty attorney John K. Fulweiler explains: “The legal issues and particular circumstances require careful examination before determining whether licensure is required. However, the bottom line is that sailing programs need to squarely look at this issue. They need to speak to their insurers and legal counsel to understand what’s necessary to maintain compliance with the federal maritime law. Plus, the state law can supplement and there may be a requirement that a state boating license be obtained.”

 

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I seem to recall a thread awhile ago on a sailing camp fatality and questions about training and certification. May be wise to assume a bad event and reverse engineer to what training might have reduced the probability, and what defense argument your lawyer will want to be making. 

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At one time, US Sailing organized a waiver from USCG Captain's Licensing if the sailing instructor was certified in your exact description of circumstances.  The wording I saw was very narrow.  See if you can find it on US Sailings website, or even call them.

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I just went over the topic last weekend at a Safety/First Aid/CPR renewal course for a USCG Captn License.  I am under the impression that some safety cert SHOULD be attained or required from the principle organization that that instructor is working at.  It does not replace a License, but check the words below: 

"the bottom line is that sailing programs need to squarely look at this issue. They need to speak to their insurers and legal counsel to understand what’s necessary to maintain compliance with the federal maritime law. Plus, the state law can supplement and there may be a requirement that a state boating license be obtained.”

Most importantly, do at least the minimum which would be to offer tutorials and some hands on helming of such boats, and if your state requires a boater's license then it should be acquired.

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10 hours ago, sea jay said:

We have a small summer Sailing School. Currently the instructors (typically high school age) ferry the students to the sail boats in a power boat. It has been suggested that because they are paid by the club the instructors are required to have a Coast Guard OUPV license. We have checked with a few local yacht clubs and sailing schools and find that most of their operators do not have any CG licenses. 

The question is do you belong to or know of similar situations (yacht club launch services, sailing school transportation of students to vessels) and how are they complying with Coat Guard Regulations?

At the sailing school in Maine that I am familiar with, the coasties are aware of the non-licensed instructors ferrying kids and are unofficially waiving the licensing.

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10 hours ago, SaylurMaine said:

At the sailing school in Maine that I am familiar with, the coasties are aware of the non-licensed instructors ferrying kids and are unofficially waiving the licensing.

But shouldn't the resolution be that these younger teens and kids that might grow up doing this activity often should get trained properly.  Especially early then they at a far advantage on some for jobs, or just life.

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Requiring the "Safe Boater Certificate" or equivalent for instructors is a start.  Our club offers the US Sailing powerboat course (and a chance to practice - very useful!) to instructors on LIS before the start of the season.  Ferrying less than 6 passengers at a time is a work-around for the license.  You probably don't want that many in a Whaler or RIB at once anyway.  In view of insurance & safety issues we put cages on all our Jr. Program props last season. 

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20 minutes ago, PaulK said:

Requiring the "Safe Boater Certificate" or equivalent for instructors is a start.  Our club offers the US Sailing powerboat course (and a chance to practice - very useful!) to instructors on LIS before the start of the season.  Ferrying less than 6 passengers at a time is a work-around for the license.  You probably don't want that many in a Whaler or RIB at once anyway.  In view of insurance & safety issues we put cages on all our Jr. Program props last season. 

+1

Good call on prop covering.  Alleviates all unnecessary prop entanglements as well....

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4 hours ago, PaulK said:

Ferrying less than 6 passengers at a time is a work-around for the license

No, that's incorrect.

If the operator of a motor vessel is being paid while carrying passengers, they must be licensed per USCG.

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6 minutes ago, Jangles13 said:

No, that's incorrect.

If the operator of a motor vessel is being paid while carrying passengers, they must be licensed per USCG.

True dat.

Carrying 6 or fewer, only gets you out of the "inspected vessel" regs.   Carrying one or more pax for hire, requires a licensed operator/captain.  And it's not whether the captain herself is being paid, it's whether the passengers are paying someone, directly or indirectly, for their "carriage".

The Coast Guard is on a drive these days to go after illegal passenger boats lacking a COI and/or a licensed captain.  This often follows complaints by the rule-following operators about the "cheats", though safety itself is the central issue no matter what triggered an inspection.   Typically they don't go around the summer sailing camps and the like, unless there's a serious accident or fatality. 

 

 

 

 

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On 12/13/2018 at 11:52 AM, ryley said:

the short answer is that if your instructors are being paid, are operating any vessel with auxiliary power, and are carrying students, then they should have at least the launch license (Restricted Masters License, because most launches carry more than 6 passengers). It's pretty easy to get, but for uninspected launches you have to be at least 17. for inspected launches it's 18.

A launch operators license is NOT easy to get.

Some years ago in New London CT the local CG commander let it be know that he was going to enforce the requirement for licensed launch operators at marinas and yacht clubs. My yacht club organized a professional class, one night a week for 5 weeks. About 35 attended. We had to go to a coast guard facility in New York  to take the test. Chartered on a bus to go and take the test. No one passed. The professional instructor, embarrassed, re taught the course for free. The coast guard moved the testing venue to New Haven and about 30 drove down to take the test. 3 passed.
 
The test itself is the same for launch operator, 6-pack, or captain. The launch operators didn't include the navigation section. So if you are going to the bother and expense of getting a coast guard license go for the captains license. It isn't any harder or more expensive to get.

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ok maybe it's not that easy to get for a 17 year old. I took the course about 10 years ago and had 0 trouble passing the Masters test with towing and sailing endorsements.

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5 hours ago, ryley said:

ok maybe it's not that easy to get for a 17 year old. I took the course about 10 years ago and had 0 trouble passing the Masters test with towing and sailing endorsements.

Yeah, 10 years after the New London incident I took a captains license course at the Sea School in Fort Lauderdale. one week, 5 nights, and the test in house at Sea School. Easy pass, although I had to go down to a coast guard facility in Miami to get the actual license.

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as the Head of my JSA program for 14 years......

 

approx. 6-8 years ago, the  rules were changed to allow US sailing certified instructors to have youth sailors allowed to be in chase boats during normal program activities need at minimum a US sailing Level I Instructors cert and a State valid safe boating license.   The reality (and biggest reason this changed) is  you'll never have sailing instructors if you expect teens and young adults who are/want to be  instructors to get a OUPV (6 pack)  and a limited master (launch driver) is for an inspected vessel   not many Boston whalers and RIB's that are inspected vessels...being around a number of different programs, it is not a daily occurrence to have kids in the chase boats...Although I;'m sure there are some places like the OP where the program boats are on moorings it is rare as far as I can tell...most optis/420's, bic, lasers are all dry sailed ....when I started at my YC I had my 50 Ton so if jr. sailors needed to come in from the water I took them....now 2 of my instructors are also club launch drivers and IF we ever needed to ferry kids any distance they do it in our club's launch..

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On 12/14/2018 at 3:10 PM, sailorman44 said:

A launch operators license is NOT easy to get.

Some years ago in New London CT the local CG commander let it be know that he was going to enforce the requirement for licensed launch operators at marinas and yacht clubs. My yacht club organized a professional class, one night a week for 5 weeks. About 35 attended. We had to go to a coast guard facility in New York  to take the test. Chartered on a bus to go and take the test. No one passed. The professional instructor, embarrassed, re taught the course for free. The coast guard moved the testing venue to New Haven and about 30 drove down to take the test. 3 passed.
 
The test itself is the same for launch operator, 6-pack, or captain. The launch operators didn't include the navigation section. So if you are going to the bother and expense of getting a coast guard license go for the captains license. It isn't any harder or more expensive to get.

How short was that bus you all were on??   ;<)

While it is not a simple test, it is not that hard...

I think I missed 1 question when I got mine.

Then again, maybe the instructor ought to be teaching impressionist painting or woodworking instead.

 

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10 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

How short was that bus you all were on??   ;<)

While it is not a simple test, it is not that hard...

I think I missed 1 question when I got mine.

Then again, maybe the instructor ought to be teaching impressionist painting or woodworking instead.

 

 Like a Grayhound, big enough for 35 people to bounce around in..

It wasn't that it was such a hard test, it was a tricky test. There were enough "trick" questions that if you hadn't paid strict attention when you were studying, you would miss them.  One of the questions was the lighting configuration of a mine sweeper when working. 
 
It didn't help that the instructor wasn't that good. He taught from the book without any  emphasis on what was important and what was trivial. I didn't help that the course was spread over 5 weeks and that there was a three week delay  before taking the test.
 
In contrast, the Sea School course instructors were top notch, knew the material, emphasized what was important, there were 3 or 4 instructors for a class of 60 so there was a lot of hands on coaching for things like navigation. The course was compressed, 5 nights and the test on Saturday.

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14 hours ago, dacapo said:

as the Head of my JSA program for 14 years......

 

approx. 6-8 years ago, the  rules were changed to allow US sailing certified instructors to have youth sailors allowed to be in chase boats during normal program activities need at minimum a US sailing Level I Instructors cert and a State valid safe boating license.   The reality (and biggest reason this changed) is  you'll never have sailing instructors if you expect teens and young adults who are/want to be  instructors to get a OUPV (6 pack)  and a limited master (launch driver) is for an inspected vessel   not many Boston whalers and RIB's that are inspected vessels...being around a number of different programs, it is not a daily occurrence to have kids in the chase boats...Although I;'m sure there are some places like the OP where the program boats are on moorings it is rare as far as I can tell...most optis/420's, bic, lasers are all dry sailed ....when I started at my YC I had my 50 Ton so if jr. sailors needed to come in from the water I took them....now 2 of my instructors are also club launch drivers and IF we ever needed to ferry kids any distance they do it in our club's launch..

Dacapo-

any chance you have a citation for the change ?

i spent ages with google and couldn’t come up with anything. 

 

Thanks

cheese. 

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Our club no longer has any US Sailing certified basic keelboat instructors - we used to have seven, but all of them dropped the cert. 

(Our understanding is that) because the instructors need a coastie 6-pack, and for that they need a Twic card, which is expensive and burdensome. 

Between the gummint and US Sailing, they have made the certification more trouble than it is worth. 

Please correct me if I have any of this wrong. 

 

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A TWIC card in order to be a sailing instructor?

Apply Online Schedule an Appointment Find an Application Center Replace a Card

The Transportation Worker Identification Credential, also known as TWIC®, is required by the Maritime Transportation Security Act for workers who need access to secure areas of the nation’s maritime facilities and vessels. TSA conducts a security threat assessment (background check) to determine a person’s eligibility and issues the credential. U.S. citizens and immigrants in certain immigration categories may apply for the credential. Most mariners licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard also require a credential. Regarding card usage and facility access requirements, please contact the U.S. Coast Guard.


Your instructors need access to secure areas of the nation's maritime facilities and vessels?  Makes no sense.  In light of dacapo's post, I have asked USCG what the deal is for sailing instructors (as opposed to launch drivers) and am awaiting reply.

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According to Boatwise, here are the requirements:

USCG Limited Masters License (also known as USCG Launch Operators License)

The USCG requires all launch operators to be licensed. This 2 day class substitutes for the USCG exam and includes a Safe Boating certificate and USCG applications.

What is the Launch Operator's License?

The Launch Operator's License comes in two versions - uninspected or inspected vessels. To drive certified (inspected) launches, typical of most yacht clubs, the holder must have the "Inspected Operator's License." The renewable license allows you to work at any yacht club or marina and is good for five (5) years. The holder may operate up to 1/2 mile from shore.

What are the USCG requirements?

The primary requirements are:

  • Age 17 for uninspected launches
  • Age 18 for inspected launches
  • 120 days underway experience on like vessels (time acquired since age 16)
  • 90 of those days in the last 3 years
  • Physical, drug test, eye exam
  • CPR/First Aid class completion
  • Certificate from an approved Safe Boating Course
  • Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC Card)

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The problem is that most of those courses teach you how to take the test, and not especially what you need to know to pass the test. They have all the 'trick' questions and will drum those into your head, for a price. The 'trick' questions for the Sail Addendum can be really silly and I was able to protest a couple of them which were probably written by someone who had never set foot on a sailing vessel. Something about 'which of these sails does not have a boom?'

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1 hour ago, PaulK said:

A TWIC card in order to be a sailing instructor?

Apply Online Schedule an Appointment Find an Application Center Replace a Card

The Transportation Worker Identification Credential, also known as TWIC®, is required by the Maritime Transportation Security Act for workers who need access to secure areas of the nation’s maritime facilities and vessels. TSA conducts a security threat assessment (background check) to determine a person’s eligibility and issues the credential. U.S. citizens and immigrants in certain immigration categories may apply for the credential. Most mariners licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard also require a credential. Regarding card usage and facility access requirements, please contact the U.S. Coast Guard.


Your instructors need access to secure areas of the nation's maritime facilities and vessels?  Makes no sense.  In light of dacapo's post, I have asked USCG what the deal is for sailing instructors (as opposed to launch drivers) and am awaiting reply.

Best to read the whole of what you post. Note part underlined. 

logical argument question:

1. The card is required for workers who need to access secure areas  ......

2. Most mariners licensed by the US coast guard require a credential

TRUE OR FALSE : most mariners licensed by the USCG need to access secure areas.... 

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Thank you everyone for your responses.

Yes, our sailboats are on moorings which necessitates transportation of the students. My understanding from studying the CG regs is that anybody transporting these students will be required to have an OUPV (uninspected vessels) or a Limited Masters License (inspected vessels and more than 6 passengers) and with each of these licenses is the requirements for a TWIC card regardless of the 1000' or 1/2 mile restriction of travel which is part of the licensing. 

I am looking for a work around to this requirement because as one poster observed, getting young instructors licensed is difficult, somewhat expensive, and perhaps unrealistic. Not surprising is the concern with drug testing. In this state marijuana is legal yet the CG requirement is zero tolerance for marijuana. 

After having a low cost summer sailing program for 8-17 yo for 40+ years, we are now in danger of losing the program to CG regulations. The young instructors are the only paid staff while the program is run by volunteers and 50% of the costs supported by donations.

We are in the process of looking at ways to comply. The fear is by not complying we could face legal problems.

 

 

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Thanks for all the research and comments above . .  

Several years ago the USCG gave our club permission to operate keel boats used in sailing lessons in our protected waters without a Six Pack. 

But the CG official we contacted did that verbally, and did not put it in writing . . 

I have some time this winter to pursue this issue - contacting Congress-critters, USCG, US Sailing, etc. 

Any clarification of the issue (such as the comments above) would be helpful. 

It's a real shame to see those bureaucrats screw up our learn to sail programs 

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Got an answer, of sorts:

shadow_bottom.pngblank.gif

Subject: Comment added: 2131
 
From: "US Coast Guard NMC" <UnitedStatesCoastGuardNMC@livehelpnow.net>

Good afternoon Sir, 

Are you asking what type of credential you may be required to hold?  If so, you would need to contact your local Sector regarding this question. The National  Maritime Center cannot provide guidance on this question.   
 
You can find a listing of all Sectors at the following link:  https://homeport.uscg.mil/  Once here, select Port Directory. The Sectors, and their contact information will be listed.   

Please contact us again if you have additional questions. 

Thank you, Linda

 

So it appears that each Coast Guard SECTOR can determine what they think works best for them.  Dacapo's setup on Long Island Sound seems to have been arranged with his sector. (Having 40-some yacht clubs in the JSALIS may have helped.)  SeaJay should contact the USCG Sector that they're in and ASK THEM.  It does NOT seem  to be mandatory for sailing instructors to have the 6-pack license. 

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On 12/16/2018 at 1:25 PM, AJ Oliver said:

Twic card, which is expensive and burdensome. 

 

It's 125 dollars and can be had in less than an hour. It's a blatant fingerprint grab, but not particularly expensive or burdensome. 

 

@ryley @Jangles13 Can you tell me of any exemption for non-motorized sailing vessels carrying less than 6 people? This seems to be a comment statement, but a strict reading of the law would imply that ANY vessel carry passengers for hire needs a licensed captain, no matter the size or power. 

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ziper,

I don't know of any specific exemption, but that doesn't mean there isn't one. That said, the USCG definition of  vessel "includes every description of watercraft or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on water." An OUPV covers carriage of up to 6 people, so even 1 person constitutes a passenger. For that matter, if you have a boat and as a condition of bringing your buddies for a sail you expect them to pay for fuel, food, drink, or anything else, then they are under the regs a "paying passenger" and you need a license. Now if you get food, fuel, or drink without making it a prerequisite to going out on the water with you, then your friends are not "paying passengers" and you don't need a license.

Clear as mud, eh?

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From 2002 but I believe it's still current

 

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CFR-2002-title46-vol1/xml/CFR-2002-title46-vol1-sec10-467.xml

Code of Federal Regulations

 
Title 46 - Shipping

10.467 Licenses for operators of uninspected passenger vessels of less than 100 gross tons.

(g) Limited operator of uninspected passenger vessel licenses may be issued to applicants to be employed by organizations such as formal camps, yacht clubs, educational institutions, and marinas. A license issued under this paragraph will be limited to the specific activity and the locality of the camp, yacht club, or marina. In order to obtain this restricted license, an applicant must:(1) Have three months service in the operation of the type of vessel for which the license is requested; and,(2) Satisfactorily complete a safe boating course approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, or those public education courses conducted by the U.S. Power Squadron or the American National Red Cross or a Coast Guard approved course; and,(3) Pass a limited examination appropriate for the activity to be conducted and the route authorized.(4) The first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course certificates required by § 10.205(h) of this part will only be required when, in the opinion of the OCMI, the geographic area over which service is authorized precludes obtaining medical services within a reasonable time.

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25 minutes ago, ryley said:

ziper,

I don't know of any specific exemption, but that doesn't mean there isn't one. That said, the USCG definition of  vessel "includes every description of watercraft or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on water." An OUPV covers carriage of up to 6 people, so even 1 person constitutes a passenger. For that matter, if you have a boat and as a condition of bringing your buddies for a sail you expect them to pay for fuel, food, drink, or anything else, then they are under the regs a "paying passenger" and you need a license. Now if you get food, fuel, or drink without making it a prerequisite to going out on the water with you, then your friends are not "paying passengers" and you don't need a license.

Clear as mud, eh?

Exactly.  The regulations are created for situations like Whale-watching boats, Sportfishing charters and Yacht club launches.  They are NOT set up for sailing instructors.  That is why the USCG National Maritime Center (see my post above)  will not provide a blanket statement saying that the 6-pack pertains to sailing instructors. The USCG National Maritime Center is likely aware that different sectors have made arrangements to accommodate the situations that exist in their jurisdictions, and doesn't want to step on their toes or upset hundreds of yacht clubs (and their members) which run learn-to-sail programs.  Sea-Jay and other heads of such programs should contact each other and then approach their USCG sector to figure out what will work best for everyone involved.  The Coast Guard wants to improve safety on the water. Making instructors get a 6-pack would be like requiring a propeller pilot to get a jet license before being able to fly. It would be counterproductive. Sector commanders realize this and have obviously made accommodations that meet both their goals and those of the sailing community.      

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13 minutes ago, See Level said:

From 2002 but I believe it's still current

 

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CFR-2002-title46-vol1/xml/CFR-2002-title46-vol1-sec10-467.xml

Code of Federal Regulations

 
Title 46 - Shipping

10.467 Licenses for operators of uninspected passenger vessels of less than 100 gross tons.

(g) Limited operator of uninspected passenger vessel licenses may be issued to applicants to be employed by organizations such as formal camps, yacht clubs, educational institutions, and marinas. A license issued under this paragraph will be limited to the specific activity and the locality of the camp, yacht club, or marina. In order to obtain this restricted license, an applicant must:(1) Have three months service in the operation of the type of vessel for which the license is requested; and,(2) Satisfactorily complete a safe boating course approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, or those public education courses conducted by the U.S. Power Squadron or the American National Red Cross or a Coast Guard approved course; and,(3) Pass a limited examination appropriate for the activity to be conducted and the route authorized.(4) The first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course certificates required by § 10.205(h) of this part will only be required when, in the opinion of the OCMI, the geographic area over which service is authorized precludes obtaining medical services within a reasonable time.

Perhaps make note of requirement #3.   Would  this give a USCG Sectional Commander the ability to determine that the US Sailing Powerboat test (or some other test)  was appropriate for for the activity to be conducted and the route authorized?  He or she could then issue "limited operator licenses" to sailing instructors who passed the test and met the other requirements. 

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14 hours ago, sea jay said:

Thank you everyone for your responses.

Yes, our sailboats are on moorings which necessitates transportation of the students. My understanding from studying the CG regs is that anybody transporting these students will be required to have an OUPV (uninspected vessels) or a Limited Masters License (inspected vessels and more than 6 passengers) and with each of these licenses is the requirements for a TWIC card regardless of the 1000' or 1/2 mile restriction of travel which is part of the licensing. 

I am looking for a work around to this requirement because as one poster observed, getting young instructors licensed is difficult, somewhat expensive, and perhaps unrealistic. Not surprising is the concern with drug testing. In this state marijuana is legal yet the CG requirement is zero tolerance for marijuana. 

After having a low cost summer sailing program for 8-17 yo for 40+ years, we are now in danger of losing the program to CG regulations. The young instructors are the only paid staff while the program is run by volunteers and 50% of the costs supported by donations.

We are in the process of looking at ways to comply. The fear is by not complying we could face legal problems.

 

 

In your situation, I would be more concerned about insurers than the coast guard.

 If there were to be an issue it's them you really need on your side. Check what they need to have in place on order to back you if someone sues the club for a loss, when one of your kids is driving...

Cheers,

               W. 

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13 hours ago, ziper1221 said:

 

@ryley @Jangles13 Can you tell me of any exemption for non-motorized sailing vessels carrying less than 6 people? This seems to be a comment statement, but a strict reading of the law would imply that ANY vessel carry passengers for hire needs a licensed captain, no matter the size or power. 

This chart provided by USCGAUX defines it in the fine print: http://wow.uscgaux.info/Uploads_wowII/P-DEPT/PaxForHire_GuideChart.pdf

"Non-motorized/non self propelled vessels carrying 6 or less paying passenger(s) need only meet REC requirements"

REC = Recreational Vessel

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7 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

In your situation, I would be more concerned about insurers than the coast guard.

 If there were to be an issue it's them you really need on your side. Check what they need to have in place on order to back you if someone sues the club for a loss, when one of your kids is driving...

Cheers,

               W. 

No doubt the insurance company would say "follow USCG requirements" and then we're back to the same issue of figuring out what those requirements are. 

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32 minutes ago, Jangles13 said:

This chart provided by USCGAUX defines it in the fine print: http://wow.uscgaux.info/Uploads_wowII/P-DEPT/PaxForHire_GuideChart.pdf

"Non-motorized/non self propelled vessels carrying 6 or less paying passenger(s) need only meet REC requirements"

REC = Recreational Vessel

The above does not apply in this situation since the vessels (Instructor's Whalers or RIB's) are motorized.  The USCG Auxiliary can be less than helpful at times. 

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For reference, this (attached) is the information provided by Nick Petronzio, Chief of Investigations for Sector Boston USCG. He is the one making the decisions for the New England area. His advisement was that indeed, if the students are paying for lessons and are transported in a motor vessel from shore to the sailboats, the operator would be required to have a USCG license; Uninspected Launch Tender Operator at a minimum, and all that goes along with it. No exemptions were offered.

scannedDoc.pdf

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The typical work around for sail camps is that students should not be passengers during "normal operations" occasional rescues and boat swaps not withstanding.  Letter of the law, they could still be counted as passengers of course! Ferrying them in and out daily sounds too risky to play that game.  I know the CG has been trying to unify all the license accreditation nationally as each sector used to be a separate kingdom in some regards. I don't know what impact that had on the licence requirements I took the coast guard test rather than a providers test and found my "limited licence" course was lacking... Maybe some provider does this now? I think SUNY Maritime had a course listed last spring for Launch driver service, still a LOT of paperwork if you need a bunch of instructors certified, maybe have one or two designated launch driver especially people who are local and you know will be back working multiple years! 

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I can;t find the exact info in my records , but has anyone just called the training and certification office at US Sailing?  They have the answer

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