J28

Carbon lifeline covers/roller

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Can any one explain how the carbon lifeline covers or rollers “work” that are seen in the photo of the J99 below?  I.E. how they attach at the pulpit, do wire or fiber lifeline run inside them, etc.?

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There are three components:

  1. Standard wire lifelines run as normal
  2. Carbon tube with a reasonable OD and sidewall thickness. These are tough to get right on bigger boats as there can be a lot of deflection when big sails are dumped on the lifelines.
  3. End fittings that push into the carbon tubes, usually made of acetyl (Delrin) and have a thru hole that's just slightly larger than the OD of the lifeline wire

They are a total pain in the ass to install and require more maintenance than you might imagine, especially on larger boats.

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We are using small diameter plastic piping from our local hardware store (originally intended for cables I believe). They come in 2m lenghts, 1-2€ per piece.

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Do such rollers contravene regulations calling for uncovered wire lifelines?

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I believe it says uncoated wire not uncovered wire

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20 hours ago, Moonduster said:

There are three components:

  1. Standard wire lifelines run as normal
  2. Carbon tube with a reasonable OD and sidewall thickness. These are tough to get right on bigger boats as there can be a lot of deflection when big sails are dumped on the lifelines.
  3. End fittings that push into the carbon tubes, usually made of acetyl (Delrin) and have a thru hole that's just slightly larger than the OD of the lifeline wire

 They are a total pain in the ass to install and require more maintenance than you might imagine, especially on larger boats.

MD, I'm doing this project over the winter for a 45'er C/R and was curious if you could give me some input on your opinions of wall thickness. 

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I have no wall thickness opinions. I've helped installing these god forsaken things on a few occasions, but I'm not directly involved in specifying or sourcing.

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The carbon is over the top for this application... Looks cool but UV will make a short mess of the finish in little time. Any hefty impact from the foredeck will shatter that tubing depending on how slack your lifelines are. Kind of a waste. We use PEX, tubing available at any hardware store. Cheap, flexible, easy to cut, comes in many colors, and lasts in the elements. Biggest benefit is super slippery for kite launches and take downs.

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The white plastic shroud covers work well.  They are split, so you just work them over the lifeline.

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I had them on a 30' sport boat.  You never came off the foredeck without itching.  Got rid of them really fast.  Not sure if I would put anything that could hold salt water in there...

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Carbon seems beyond dumb for this application.

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On 1/1/2019 at 8:08 PM, Moonduster said:

There are three components:

  1. Standard wire lifelines run as normal
  2. Carbon tube with a reasonable OD and sidewall thickness. These are tough to get right on bigger boats as there can be a lot of deflection when big sails are dumped on the lifelines.
  3. End fittings that push into the carbon tubes, usually made of acetyl (Delrin) and have a thru hole that's just slightly larger than the OD of the lifeline wire

They are a total pain in the ass to install and require more maintenance than you might imagine, especially on larger boats.

or just go the easy route and use PEX tubing - also has the advantage that it is slick so sails glide over them easily (as they NEVER rotate anyway)

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I assumed (shame on me) the covers/tubes in the photo are carbon.  I don't know what they are actually made of.

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11 hours ago, Christian said:

or just go the easy route and use PEX tubing - also has the advantage that it is slick so sails glide over them easily (as they NEVER rotate anyway)

Get the pex sticks they are straight. If you get the pex from a coil its very hard to get straight almost impossibly .

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On 1/5/2019 at 3:54 PM, Gracious said:

Get the pex sticks they are straight. If you get the pex from a coil its very hard to get straight almost impossibly .

But off course

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On 1/5/2019 at 6:53 PM, J28 said:

I assumed (shame on me) the covers/tubes in the photo are carbon.  I don't know what they are actually made of.

These ones are indeed carbon

For our J88 we have thought of adding them, they’re in list of parts if we go ahead with a spinnaker takedown system and also our class size J2 has a very full foot which even catches stanchion rollers but would be unlikely to catch with these in place. Conventional pvc pipe can work but over time will crack and split. The carbon could be damaged if given a heavy impact but that’s just something you run the risk of

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13 minutes ago, JL92S said:

These ones are indeed carbon

For our J88 we have thought of adding them, they’re in list of parts if we go ahead with a spinnaker takedown system

Are you planning a TP-52 style string system? Would be cool if you could share more details. 

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It won’t be massively complicated but 2 of our kites are already running a twin retrieval patch type setup allowing for a faster drop, version 1 of the plan will probably just be a long retrieval line that stays rigged on the port side which uses a pair of blocks down below so anyone in the cockpit can pull the line or the sewer can pull from inside the cabin. Some mates race a turbo’d Mumm 30 that uses a retrieval system similar to a take up reeler and they say it works well but we’ll see

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Pretty difficult to do a TP52-style retrieval system without a grinding pedestal. To get wicked fast retrieval, the drum ratio needs to be quite large and so that loads get pretty big. Multi-block purchases can be tricky because they tend to foul themselves.

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I've seen both lifeline-dependent systems (tubes with inserts) and stanchion-dependent (straight tubes, nubbin on the stanchion).

 

I think the stanchion depenent would work better for powered takedowns, as well as boats with synthetic lifelines. Not a huge advantage on most boats if you've got proper stanchion rollers and aren't launching/retrieving out of the forward hatch.

 

HW

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