sbman

Getting started... First sailboat

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My first foray into sailing, a Mull - Ranger 26.  Not in any way a big cruising boat, but should be fun to get started with and gather experience.

Have to start somewhere and a small, simple Keelboat seems like a good place.

i-mDx9rwd-XL.jpg

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Excellent choice. That boat is a classic and yours looks well kept.

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Nice boat. Now go put there and use it, a lot.  Don't forget to have fun while you're learning 

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That boat can teach you a lot.  Well done for starting with a good solid, modest-scale FUN boat.

 

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Yes, nice boat, congratulations!

And I must say I kinda like the hanked-on jib for boats this size too.  You can rig a light line (~1/8") downhaul to the top hank that you can use to pull the headsail down from the cockpit if sailing short-handed.  Did this with my Catalina 27 BITD, made the admiral happy that I did not have to go forward and leave her at the helm when coming in. 

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29 minutes ago, CruiserJim said:

Yes, nice boat, congratulations!

And I must say I kinda like the hanked-on jib for boats this size too.  You can rig a light line (~1/8") downhaul to the top hank that you can use to pull the headsail down from the cockpit if sailing short-handed.  Did this with my Catalina 27 BITD, made the admiral happy that I did not have to go forward and leave her at the helm when coming in. 

I prefer the second hank down for the downhaul, sometimes the top one will, for some unknown reason, kink and jam.

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6 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I prefer the second hank down for the downhaul, sometimes the top one will, for some unknown reason, kink and jam.

I may have used the 2nd hank also, I don't remember now.  Sold that boat in 1996!

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I rigged a downhaul for my Oday 23 when I first bought her way back when.  But I still think the roller furler I put on a couple of years later was the single best upgrade I ever made to the boat.  I went cheap and simple with a CDI, and never had a problem.

Btw, the Ranger is a terrific boat.  Nice sailer.  

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Unless my eyes are messing with me the bow pulpit is missing. So...if you're not replacing it this would impact your choice of sail handling for the jib. There's not a lot of room on the dancefloor up there to coral the jib once down,  even if you've rigged a downhaul back to the cockpit for hanked on handling. 

I'd seriously cut to the chase and get a furler.

Good luck, and yeah, nice boat!

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Now you've done it. You're doomed to a life of putzing about in boats, ever lusting after a few more feet, a bit more storage, a smidge more headroom. There lies madness. Welcome.

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3 minutes ago, chester said:

Hmmmm...and yet it has double life lines...hooked to what?

toerail

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Time to sell it and get a bigger boat.;)

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Yes, the pulpit is missing, it was removed for repair and not re-installed. I'll be reinstalling it.  The boat is fairly well kept and it's definitely a fun little boat.

Hopefully the mustache will peel off.  I'll sail it at first with the hanked on jib and see how that goes. I put it below for storage, it's not too much trouble to re-attach it.   I appreciate the suggestions for the downhaul, I hadn't thought of that.

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The Muff is somewhat well known around SD; Paul is quite a character; he offers mustache rides!. I think the spin has a mustache on it too.   I've sailed the boat - it's gone through a number of mis-fitted sails, and had some deck issues (check the stanchion bases).   But it'll get you out on the water!

 

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I grew up racing on a Ranger 23 and occasionally a Ranger 26. A very well designed boat as I recall with a nice turn of speed for its day and size. Well done!

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Great design and a good looking boat to boot.  

Use a heat gun (hair dryer on high may work too) on that graphic.   Should come right off.   

And dont be put off from the inevitable "show us your wife/GF/sisters mamaries...F U Newb" post.   Right of passage 'round here.

Good luck.

 

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Heat will get it off but go slow, it's time and temperature - too much and it melts to a goo, too little and it tears. Just right and it comes off clean as a whistle - pull slowly and as up as possible adding heat as necessary.  If it's leaving goo on slow down and reduce heat.  I have removed literally millions of sticky things. 

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I'm trying to figure out what an acceptable amount of weight is acceptable for an outboard for this boat.

 

I put a 4 hp two stroke yamaha on it to move it the first time, but the shaft is too short and I have to get everyone to come aft to hold the prop deeper in the water to keep it from sucking air through the prop. This is obviously not a good solution so I'm looking for a longshaft motor.

The issue is that all the longshaft motors I'm finding are four stroke 7-8 hp models that weigh a lot more than my little 2 stroke yamaha.  I don't want to overstress the transom mount on the boat, this boat was designed with lighter two strokes in mind obviously because of it's age.  There is no weight or HP recommendation in the owners manual for the boat.

Any thoughts on putting a modern 8 hp four stroke longshaft motor on it?  It would be a pull start model.  Otherwise, I'll have to keep looking for an older two stroke longshaft, but that is turning out to be very difficult to find.

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12 minutes ago, sbman said:

I'm trying to figure out what an acceptable amount of weight is acceptable for an outboard for this boat.

 

I put a 4 hp two stroke yamaha on it to move it the first time, but the shaft is too short and I have to get everyone to come aft to hold the prop deeper in the water to keep it from sucking air through the prop. This is obviously not a good solution so I'm looking for a longshaft motor.

The issue is that all the longshaft motors I'm finding are four stroke 7-8 hp models that weigh a lot more than my little 2 stroke yamaha.  I don't want to overstress the transom mount on the boat, this boat was designed with lighter two strokes in mind obviously because of it's age.  There is no weight or HP recommendation in the owners manual for the boat.

Any thoughts on putting a modern 8 hp four stroke longshaft motor on it?  It would be a pull start model.  Otherwise, I'll have to keep looking for an older two stroke longshaft, but that is turning out to be very difficult to find.

An 8HP 4 stroke would be heavy.  Search for a used Honda 5hp 4 stroke. I borrowed one for my Coronado 25 a few times and it was perfect.

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That was my point. I'm not able to find any 5 hp longshaft motors in the used market.  They just aren't around, I've been looking since I bought the boat. Anything longshaft under 8 hp seems to be nearly impossible to find.  Nearly new ones for $1800+ can be found, but that's not going to happen for this boat.

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Ah, lack of used options. Sorry for being obtuse.

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I went through this same problem two summers ago when I had to replace my 8hp two stroke, long shaft on my Oday 23.  No one makes small two strokes any more, and I needed to have electric start (the Admiral insisted), so that further limited my used options down to zero.

In looking for a new engine, I found that the smallest long shaft with electric start to be an 8 hp, with the Tohatsu being the best option.  The smallest long shaft I could find is the Tohatsu 6 hp "SailPro" model (extra long even if you want), but you can't get it with electric start.

https://www.tohatsu.com/outboards/6_4st.html

Once I picked my new engine, that was only the start.  The engine mounting bracket on my transom was OEM, and wasn't rated for a four stroke.  I called Garelick and asked them if it made a big difference, and I spent about 20 minutes on the phone with a great customer service rep who convinced me that it made a big difference.  Of course, I couldn't just buy a new mounting bracket; the transom "spacer block" (that wedge of fiberglass that holds the bracket off the transom) wasn't wide enough to accomodate the base of new mounting bracket.  Options:  make a new spacer block; or, make an "adapter" plate wide enough to accommodate the new bracket.  I went with the adapter.

Of course this is all moot for me now since a I bought a new boat a few months ago and now need to sell the Oday....

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7 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

I went through this same problem two summers ago when I had to replace my 8hp two stroke, long shaft on my Oday 23.  No one makes small two strokes any more, and I needed to have electric start (the Admiral insisted), so that further limited my used options down to zero.

In looking for a new engine, I found that the smallest long shaft with electric start to be an 8 hp, with the Tohatsu being the best option.  The smallest long shaft I could find is the Tohatsu 6 hp "SailPro" model (extra long even if you want), but you can't get it with electric start.

https://www.tohatsu.com/outboards/6_4st.html

Once I picked my new engine, that was only the start.  The engine mounting bracket on my transom was OEM, and wasn't rated for a four stroke.  I called Garelick and asked them if it made a big difference, and I spent about 20 minutes on the phone with a great customer service rep who convinced me that it made a big difference.  Of course, I couldn't just buy a new mounting bracket; the transom "spacer block" (that wedge of fiberglass that holds the bracket off the transom) wasn't wide enough to accomodate the base of new mounting bracket.  Options:  make a new spacer block; or, make an "adapter" plate wide enough to accommodate the new bracket.  I went with the adapter.

Of course this is all moot for me now since a I bought a new boat a few months ago and now need to sell the Oday....

The Tohatsu website shows an electric start 6 HP long shaft that weighs 90 pounds, not available in the U.S. The pull start 7.5 honda I'm looking at is only 70 pounds.

My Ranger just has a cutout in the back for a motor with a well to catch any splash.  There is no bracket, it mounts directly to the hull.  There are no specifications I can find for weight or even power rating to put on it.  I've looked for advertisements of other rangers to see what most people have and all the ad's I've found that include a motor have been a 9.9 of some variation.  Maybe I'm overthinking it and the little 7.5 would be OK.

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5 minutes ago, sbman said:

The Tohatsu website shows an electric start 6 HP long shaft that weighs 90 pounds, not available in the U.S. The pull start 7.5 honda I'm looking at is only 70 pounds.

My Ranger just has a cutout in the back for a motor with a well to catch any splash.  There is no bracket, it mounts directly to the hull.  There are no specifications I can find for weight or even power rating to put on it.  I've looked for advertisements of other rangers to see what most people have and all the ad's I've found that include a motor have been a 9.9 of some variation.  Maybe I'm overthinking it and the little 7.5 would be OK.

I used a 7.5 hp Honda on my first Shark 24, the heavier 8 hp Honda on my second Shark. For what I did, they worked well.

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Original R26 brochures stated that a 6 hp motor would easily drive the boat, but, like you, I can't find any other specific weight or power statements.

When I bought mine in 93 it had a 9.9 Mercury with electric start and charging on it, guessing it weighed close to 90 lbs. The Merc was giving me some issues so I replaced it with an 8 hp Johnson that weighs around 60 lbs. But it seems that 9.9 is or was default size for most people when they needed a new engine. I would guess that you'd be safe going with 80 or 90 lbs.

I thought one of the benefits of the stern cutout was that it allowed use of a standard 20 inch shaft length. But if a longer shaft length is needed some manufacturers offer kits to get the longer length. Trying to find one of the kits for an older engine might be a problem, though.

If you go with a larger hp engine be aware that the size of the powerhead and orientation of the handle, etc. may make it difficult to tilt the engine head into the well and engage the pivot lock. So if you want to reduce drag while sailing you might have to improvise.

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SB, based on where you will be sailing, have you thought about the HP you'll need? I sail on an inland lake, so I can get by with 2+ HP. Almost anyplace else, I would need more.

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21 hours ago, Bull City said:

SB, based on where you will be sailing, have you thought about the HP you'll need? I sail on an inland lake, so I can get by with 2+ HP. Almost anyplace else, I would need more.

My boat is permanently based in San Diego bay, so I'll be sailing in the bay.  The 4 HP yamaha moved it along just fine, if the shaft was 6" longer it would be OK. I've got a lead on the 7.5 honda four stroke that weighs 70 pounds.  Looks like it will be about the best I can find in the used market unless I happen on a mystical 5 hp at some point.  Wanting to get the motor upgraded so I can use the boat more reliably as I learn to sail.

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It happened that a 5hp Honda four stroke Longshaft showed up on the local craigslist, so I snatched it up.  Going to service it and then it will be ready to go!

Nice and light and plenty of power.

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On 1/19/2019 at 10:42 AM, sbman said:

It happened that a 5hp Honda four stroke Longshaft showed up on the local craigslist, so I snatched it up.  Going to service it and then it will be ready to go!

Nice and light and plenty of power.

See? Patience, young jedi.

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Depending on what area you are in, you might want to investigate if there are any local "beer can" racing series. These are usually during the week and are more casual and relaxed than the more serious weekend racing. It's not only a great way to quickly improve your sailing skills, but can also make it easier to find pick up crew if you don't have regular crew to go out sailing with you.

When I first moved to the SF bay area, I got started sailing locally by going to the Friday night beer can races in Berkeley, where you could just show up on O dock with your gear and there was always somebody looking for some extra crew, so I was always able to get a ride. It's a great way to build out your sailing social circle, too, as a lot of the races have a dinner afterwards, too.

In some areas, there are also occasional organized crew list parties for skippers and crew to find one another. These might happen once or twice a year and you can specify what type of sailing you are looking to do and what kind of crew you are looking for.

Enjoy and have fun!

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Kady - The boat is in San Diego Bay.  The main beercan race is run by Cortez Racing Association, and it's wednesday nights, starting 5/22  Cortezracing.com 

However, there are over 100 boats participating, split into about 7 fleets, including some TP52's and America's cup sailors, so it can be a bit more serious than other beer can races... The OP will be in the later groups, so as long as he stays clear until his start he'll be fine.... but it could be a bit intimidating to a new sailor.  

There is also a beer can series in the south bay put on by the Coronado yacht club  http://www.coronadoyc.org/  Also wednesdays, starting 4/10

And finally, there's a facebook web page for sailors in San Diego, for finding crew....   https://www.facebook.com/groups/sailorsinsd/

 

 

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2 hours ago, Kirwan said:

Kady - The boat is in San Diego Bay.  The main beercan race is run by Cortez Racing Association, and it's wednesday nights, starting 5/22  Cortezracing.com 

However, there are over 100 boats participating, split into about 7 fleets, including some TP52's and America's cup sailors, so it can be a bit more serious than other beer can races... The OP will be in the later groups, so as long as he stays clear until his start he'll be fine.... but it could be a bit intimidating to a new sailor.  

There is also a beer can series in the south bay put on by the Coronado yacht club  http://www.coronadoyc.org/  Also wednesdays, starting 4/10

And finally, there's a facebook web page for sailors in San Diego, for finding crew....   https://www.facebook.com/groups/sailorsinsd/

 

 

I'll definitely be interested in the beer can series.  I'd like to start by crewing with some other boat though before I enter as a skipper of my own boat.  I'll start asking around for crewing opportunities when it gets closer.  If you know anyone that would want a newbie on board in a similarly small sized boat, I'd be game.  I'm still sorting out various issues with my boat during the winter before it's ready for regular sailing.

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Congratulations on your new boat. I have a Santana27, another Gary Mull designed boat with similar but slightly larger dimensions that is now 50 years young. Last summer we did a 300 mile cruise up to the Gulf islands and the boat did great and are planning a return this year.

I repowered our boat with cruising in mind and added a Yamaha 9.9 xtra long shaft and it’s a tight but do-able fit. Out currents can get pretty strong in Puget Sound which is why I opted for more power.

For your uses I would suggest the Tohatsu SailPro with its extra long shaft at 6hp. They can be found used, as I actually need to sell mine. The SailPro has the longest shaft at about 27”. I think you’ll like it. 

 

 

 

 

19DE74CF-08D8-49EC-9654-72B2550A2BF8.jpeg

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