Zonker

Wild Eyes found after eight years

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On 1/9/2019 at 8:53 AM, SCANAS said:

Your friend was in the wrong job. 

Nope, whoever it was really wasn't.

Try turning up at an Australian Antarctic base and asking for resupply. Let me know how you get on. I'm damn sure I know what the response will be, and you won't like it.

FKT

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Funny thing is no one can own real property in Antarctica. So you can't keep people out of your base, but you can lock the doors and keep them out of your buildings until they get cold and go someplace else.

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On 1/10/2019 at 1:35 AM, dogballs Tom said:

Messing with small showers isn't all that smart either. During my instrument training, my instructor decided to go ahead and let me fly through a little one since we were on an instrument flight plan and he could use the actual instrument time.

It was just a baby shower, maybe a mile or two in diameter and not tall.

I heard the rain hitting the windshield and saw the altitude start to drop. Pretty soon, I was at full power, Vy, and descending at 500' per minute. We weren't that far from the ground. I looked at him, pointed to the throttle and vertical speed indicator, shrugged, and he took over. He knew where the closest edge was.

That little storm was plenty strong enough to have a downdraft that exceeded our max climb rate.

I have a buddy who went from a planing motor boat to a sailboat. Needless to say, he had to learn the hard way about current versus boat speed over your intended course. "THAT'S why you sailors are always leaving the dock at some godawful time in the morning."

Same deal, different axis.

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20 hours ago, IStream said:

I have a buddy who went from a planing motor boat to a sailboat. Needless to say, he had to learn the hard way about current versus boat speed over your intended course. "THAT'S why you sailors are always leaving the dock at some godawful time in the morning."

Same deal, different axis.

Compensating for wind or current is something I learned the hard way a few times in little boats as a little boy. It now seems so obvious.

It's really not that obvious. When I was a flight instructor, I'd explain it to students, who would nod as if they understood. We'd get in a plane and I'd pick a road that was across the wind and say, "Fly over that road."

They'd point the airplane straight down the road.

Moments later, "You're not over the road."

This demonstration would cause them to get it, some more quickly than others.

Mostly it was boaters who were bored with the explanation and demonstration and got it immediately.

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2 hours ago, dogballs Tom said:

Compensating for wind or current is something I learned the hard way a few times in little boats as a little boy. It now seems so obvious.

It's really not that obvious. When I was a flight instructor, I'd explain it to students, who would nod as if they understood. We'd get in a plane and I'd pick a road that was across the wind and say, "Fly over that road."

They'd point the airplane straight down the road.

Moments later, "You're not over the road."

This demonstration would cause them to get it, some more quickly than others.

Mostly it was boaters who were bored with the explanation and demonstration and got it immediately.

 

When I was in flight training in a Cessna 152, I watched us going backwards along the beach in slow flight with a strong winter wind...

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On 1/12/2019 at 3:37 AM, dogballs Tom said:

It's really not that obvious. When I was a flight instructor, I'd explain it to students, who would nod as if they understood. We'd get in a plane and I'd pick a road that was across the wind and say, "Fly over that road."

They'd point the airplane straight down the road.

Moments later, "You're not over the road."

...and I had a flight instructor who thought that since the nose wasn't parallel to the runway when climbing out with a 10 kt crosswind - that I wasn't over the runway. He took the controls and put the plane into a climbing slip in order to force it to be inline with the runway and said "isn't that better?". I said "no", took the controls back from him and radioed to the tower that we were doing a full stop.

45 minutes of arguing with him and he still thought that the crosswind was "hitting" the side of the plane, requiring extra rudder input. He later crashed and burned (literally) when he tried to turn back to the runway after an engine out. He was a 4000+ hour pilot.

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4 hours ago, W9GFO said:

45 minutes of arguing with him and he still thought that the crosswind was "hitting" the side of the plane, requiring extra rudder input.

Umm... it was. If you slip while climbing, which is a new one on me.

 

On 1/12/2019 at 9:02 AM, billy backstay said:

When I was in flight training in a Cessna 152, I watched us going backwards along the beach in slow flight with a strong winter wind...

A guy who worked at the banner company with me was once attempting to return to the airport before a thunderstorm arrived and didn't make it. He wound up at wide open throttle going backward over Interstate 95 with a banner in tow. Or in the lead. As I recall, he resolved his predicament by dropping his banner and then landing at Ft Lauderdale Executive, which wasn't popular with the tower guys, who were not used to a maniac that would taxi over to the grass and run around gathering up his banner instead of going to the terminal like a normal person. He did get the banner rolled up and inside the plane and got it tied down before the storm arrived.

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40 minutes ago, dogballs Tom said:

Umm... it was. If you slip while climbing, which is a new one on me.

 

A guy who worked at the banner company with me was once attempting to return to the airport before a thunderstorm arrived and didn't make it. He wound up at wide open throttle going backward over Interstate 95 with a banner in tow. Or in the lead. As I recall, he resolved his predicament by dropping his banner and then landing at Ft Lauderdale Executive, which wasn't popular with the tower guys, who were not used to a maniac that would taxi over to the grass and run around gathering up his banner instead of going to the terminal like a normal person. He did get the banner rolled up and inside the plane and got it tied down before the storm arrived.

 

I am sure there are a lot crazy but true stories about FLL Exec jetport!  I have driven by there many times, but never had enough loose pocket change to fly in or out of there...

I do know one corporate jet pilot who had a malfunctioning navigation device, after departing the US, IFR  for South America. He removed a module from under the cockpit floor, whacked it once or twice, then put it back, and it worked fine thereafter for the duration.  When he was not flying, that guy could drink all of us under the table!!!

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42 minutes ago, dogballs Tom said:

Umm... it was. If you slip while climbing, which is a new one on me.

Umm, no. The crosswind was not "hitting" the side of the plane, the apparent wind created by slipping was.

He tried to explain to me that the crosswind coming from the left was hitting the tail of the plane, requiring right rudder to compensate; which is correct when the wheels are still on the ground. And to fly a straight course you then need to put in opposite aileron, resulting in a climbing (poorly) slip.

I tried to teach him that once the tires leave the ground there is no longer a need to correct for the crosswind, the ground track is what mattered, not the direction the plane is pointing.

This extremely fundamental concept was lost on him. He sincerely believed that that the crosswind continued to come at the plane from the side when airborne. He was explaining it to me as if I were a four year old. I never flew with him again. I believe this lack of understanding of basic aerodynamics contributed to his death.

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21 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Same reason you have to hang on tight at the equator and get dizzy at the poles :rolleyes:

 

How to determine the exact location of the Poles? Look for the endless circle of footprints ringed with a myriad of discarded compasses.

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6 hours ago, W9GFO said:
7 hours ago, dogballs Tom said:

Umm... it was. If you slip while climbing, which is a new one on me.

Umm, no. The crosswind was not "hitting" the side of the plane, the apparent wind created by slipping was.

He tried to explain to me that the crosswind coming from the left was hitting the tail of the plane, requiring right rudder to compensate; which is correct when the wheels are still on the ground. And to fly a straight course you then need to put in opposite aileron, resulting in a climbing (poorly) slip.

I tried to teach him that once the tires leave the ground there is no longer a need to correct for the crosswind, the ground track is what mattered, not the direction the plane is pointing.

This extremely fundamental concept was lost on him. He sincerely believed that that the crosswind continued to come at the plane from the side when airborne. He was explaining it to me as if I were a four year old. I never flew with him again. I believe this lack of understanding of basic aerodynamics contributed to his death.

That's the crosswind I was talking about! Sad to hear the guy died but glad he's not out there confusing the shit out of students.

I do wonder how that could happen? Not only should the required testing have found the problem, but I worked in one flight school and was around a couple of others along the way when I was teaching. In every case, what did the instructors do when no students were around? Talk about flying, mostly. That guy had to get through a lot of tests and a lot of conversations with people who knew their shit. How?

 

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8 hours ago, dogballs Tom said:

That's the crosswind I was talking about! Sad to hear the guy died but glad he's not out there confusing the shit out of students.

I do wonder how that could happen? Not only should the required testing have found the problem, but I worked in one flight school and was around a couple of others along the way when I was teaching. In every case, what did the instructors do when no students were around? Talk about flying, mostly. That guy had to get through a lot of tests and a lot of conversations with people who knew their shit. How?

 

I once had a long conversation with someone who thought a PBY Catalina would be very hard to fly in a crosswind because the wind would hit the large rudder. This is true - on the surface! They refused to believe it would not constantly turn into the wind once aloft :rolleyes: I also knew a *commercial pilot* who only wanted to fly the C-208s because the C-206s will quit if the battery goes dead. He knew his car wouldn't run with a dead battery, so clearly the 206 would not either :rolleyes:

* for non-pilots, there is no such thing as a certified aircraft with one battery and one alternator that would quit running if said battery went dead. The C-206 has magnetos which are totally independent of the battery and also each other, 2 plugs per cylinder and you can fly on one well enough to get to your destination.

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