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mikewof

Why the cheap-ass crushed ice machine in your fridge is perfect

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The last crushed ice machine that I saw cost something like $3,500, and the owner made apologies as he showed it to me. Then he made probably the single best Cantarito that I ever had. The crushed ice out of that machine was some of the most uniform I had ever seen, it was the ISO 9000 of crushed ice makers. I have no idea how many engineers worked on that crushing mechanism to achieve that level of consistency. 

But here's the deal ... that Cantarito was exquisite in every way, he used only an ounce of the Squirt soda, (which is often difficult to find outside of liquor stores) and topped off the rest with straight seltzer, because too much of the ascorbic acid from the Squirt can negatively effect the mouth feel of a half decent tequila. (Use 2 ounces of the tequila, top shelf not necessary because the fruit acids will eat away the delicate flavors of the good stuff, and the Blanco won't help in the hangovers department here anyway, because there is a lot of natural sugar in the fruit juices. Uno or dos good Cantaritos per night is more than sufficient to keep a gentleman in top shape.) He didn't cut corners on the juice, the squeezed a fresh yellow grapefruit (not ruby red) and used 2 ounces of that, and he used 1 ounce of juice from a couple mandarin oranges. (He said that blood orange juice works even better because of the added bitter.) And then half an ounce of fresh lime juice. (He used key limes, but I can't imagine it would taste too different with regular limes.) He threw in a lime wedge and about a 1/4 teaspoon of kosher salt. (Not the rim you heathen, on top of the liquid, this isn't a chain of stylish Tex-Mex restaurant, after all.)

That Cantarito was exquisite in every way, he even used the right clay pots, which should be the cheapest possible ones that they sell at the Mexican grocery on the side of town that you only tend to drive through because us Mexicans make you vaguely yearn for your tasteful suburban furnishings.) The clay pots should be the cheapest ones, because you should have no resistance to throwing the whole thing -- at a moment's notice -- at that hell-forsaken coyote that keeps roaming too close the fenceline, that canine bastard bitch. In Mexico, the roadside guy hands to the clay pot with the heavenly stuff inside, and off you go, the clay pot is the travel cup for the Cantarito, designed to be disposable as needed, or good for holding some brake fluid in a pinch as you walk down Highway 89 to your truck that suddenly threw a caliper because you didn't replace the pads two years ago when they started squealing, so you tied that brake line in a knot, added some fresh brake fluid from your Cantarito pot, and Bob's your uncle, motherfucker, we got brakes again!

But as exquisite as the Cantarito was, there was one bit of overkill. That damned ice-grinding contraption with the tasteful European styling. 

When you have a recipe that you decide calls for crushed ice, then you have made a helluva decision. You just put your ass on the line. Because when you call for crushed ice, you have made a simultaneous decision that regular ice cubes of any assorted size or configuration are the wrong choice for that drink. And when you know why you decided that regular ice cubes of various size choices are the wrong choice for that drink, then you will understand why that crappy crushed ice machine in your fridge is exactly what that drink needs.

So, why crushed ice? Because crushed ice SHOULD accomplish what cubes cannot! 

The whole point of crushed ice is VARIETY of cubes. You have the tiny shards that melt fast into the drink to make it cold fast, you have the medium-sized ice shards that give that orgasm-inducing mouth feel as the first sip of the drink touches your mouth, and you have the bigger cubes that linger in the bottom of the clay pot as your conversations stretch into the evening, as your thoughts become somber and focused. The little shards are the injected gasoline mist droplets in your cylinder, the medium shards are the line of fuel moving toward the fuel pump and then toward the rail and the injectors where they will become motion and reason. And the big shards are the fuel in your tank.

But that $3,500 ice maker had none of that. It just has perfectly-sized shards, user-selectable up the bunghole, but every clay pot was filled with cubes of roughly the same size, and they all melted at the same rate, and the designers of that machine forgot that good conversations accompany good drinks, and sometimes sips don't happen at exactly the same pace. Sometimes, a gentleman or a lady will down half the blessed nectar, and then finally learn the secret to their biggest mystery, and then a good bit later, the tattered remains of the diluted Cantarito will hold out a hand, and walk with our hero through a field of stickers and flowers.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is why the icemaker in your $225 Monkey Wards fridge is so outstanding to the home barman. Because it spits out shards of all different shapes and sizes, and it embraces the complexity of our human condition, rather than attempt to codify us as drink-swilling robots.

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22 minutes ago, mikewof said:

The last crushed ice machine that I saw cost something like $3,500, and the owner made apologies as he showed it to me. Then he made probably the single best Cantarito that I ever had. The crushed ice out of that machine was some of the most uniform I had ever seen, it was the ISO 9000 of crushed ice makers. I have no idea how many engineers worked on that crushing mechanism to achieve that level of consistency. 

But here's the deal ... that Cantarito was exquisite in every way, he used only an ounce of the Squirt soda, (which is often difficult to find outside of liquor stores) and topped off the rest with straight seltzer, because too much of the ascorbic acid from the Squirt can negatively effect the mouth feel of a half decent tequila. (Use 2 ounces of the tequila, top shelf not necessary because the fruit acids will eat away the delicate flavors of the good stuff, and the Blanco won't help in the hangovers department here anyway, because there is a lot of natural sugar in the fruit juices. Uno or dos good Cantaritos per night is more than sufficient to keep a gentleman in top shape.) He didn't cut corners on the juice, the squeezed a fresh yellow grapefruit (not ruby red) and used 2 ounces of that, and he used 1 ounce of juice from a couple mandarin oranges. (He said that blood orange juice works even better because of the added bitter.) And then half an ounce of fresh lime juice. (He used key limes, but I can't imagine it would taste too different with regular limes.) He threw in a lime wedge and about a 1/4 teaspoon of kosher salt. (Not the rim you heathen, on top of the liquid, this isn't a chain of stylish Tex-Mex restaurant, after all.)

That Cantarito was exquisite in every way, he even used the right clay pots, which should be the cheapest possible ones that they sell at the Mexican grocery on the side of town that you only tend to drive through because us Mexicans make you vaguely yearn for your tasteful suburban furnishings.) The clay pots should be the cheapest ones, because you should have no resistance to throwing the whole thing -- at a moment's notice -- at that hell-forsaken coyote that keeps roaming too close the fenceline, that canine bastard bitch. In Mexico, the roadside guy hands to the clay pot with the heavenly stuff inside, and off you go, the clay pot is the travel cup for the Cantarito, designed to be disposable as needed, or good for holding some brake fluid in a pinch as you walk down Highway 89 to your truck that suddenly threw a caliper because you didn't replace the pads two years ago when they started squealing, so you tied that brake line in a knot, added some fresh brake fluid from your Cantarito pot, and Bob's your uncle, motherfucker, we got brakes again!

But as exquisite as the Cantarito was, there was one bit of overkill. That damned ice-grinding contraption with the tasteful European styling. 

When you have a recipe that you decide calls for crushed ice, then you have made a helluva decision. You just put your ass on the line. Because when you call for crushed ice, you have made a simultaneous decision that regular ice cubes of any assorted size or configuration are the wrong choice for that drink. And when you know why you decided that regular ice cubes of various size choices are the wrong choice for that drink, then you will understand why that crappy crushed ice machine in your fridge is exactly what that drink needs.

So, why crushed ice? Because crushed ice SHOULD accomplish what cubes cannot! 

The whole point of crushed ice is VARIETY of cubes. You have the tiny shards that melt fast into the drink to make it cold fast, you have the medium-sized ice shards that give that orgasm-inducing mouth feel as the first sip of the drink touches your mouth, and you have the bigger cubes that linger in the bottom of the clay pot as your conversations stretch into the evening, as your thoughts become somber and focused. The little shards are the injected gasoline mist droplets in your cylinder, the medium shards are the line of fuel moving toward the fuel pump and then toward the rail and the injectors where they will become motion and reason. And the big shards are the fuel in your tank.

But that $3,500 ice maker had none of that. It just has perfectly-sized shards, user-selectable up the bunghole, but every clay pot was filled with cubes of roughly the same size, and they all melted at the same rate, and the designers of that machine forgot that good conversations accompany good drinks, and sometimes sips don't happen at exactly the same pace. Sometimes, a gentleman or a lady will down half the blessed nectar, and then finally learn the secret to their biggest mystery, and then a good bit later, the tattered remains of the diluted Cantarito will hold out a hand, and walk with our hero through a field of stickers and flowers.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is why the icemaker in your $225 Monkey Wards fridge is so outstanding to the home barman. Because it spits out shards of all different shapes and sizes, and it embraces the complexity of our human condition, rather than attempt to codify us as drink-swilling robots.

got an Innovee Manual Ice Crusher for $40 on Amazon for the old man the other day. He's suffering from kidney failure, and has to suck on ice chips, and the damn ice machine in that shitty frig died. He loves this.

 

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Ice crusher - makes shards whatever size you desire.

Dirt cheap.

image.png.9c8f6b6743d0035591575fad6ff45585.png

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Ice crusher for when the hammer won't do.

icebreaker-henry-larsen.JPG

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9 hours ago, VOA said:

Hey wofsey, buy an add FFS

You inebriated elderly gentleman, what would I advertise? Shitty ice crushers?

I'm suggesting that the expensive ice crushers are the wrong choice unless you happen to own a bar or have a hundred guests. You own a bar, go spend your rupiah on a $3,500 ice crusher. Wouldn't that be an anti-ad?

By the way, what's the deal with Kratom? Is that stuff popular in Indonesia? Anyone here tried it? It's already made illegal in several U.S. states.

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9 hours ago, VOA said:

Hey wofsey, buy an add FFS

You bothered reading that dribble?

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10 hours ago, Raz'r said:

got an Innovee Manual Ice Crusher for $40 on Amazon for the old man the other day. He's suffering from kidney failure, and has to suck on ice chips, and the damn ice machine in that shitty frig died. He loves this.

A friend had one of those on his boat, the ice from that thing made the most perfect Gin and Bitter Lemon I have ever had. 

He made them the same way as regular G&Ts, but he used lemon juice, soda water and a crushed aspirin/quinine powder mixture. I have no idea where he got the pharmaceutical quinine, but those were damned good. The ice was beautifully ground from that machine.

 

Sorry to hear about your old man's kidneys, that's a rough road.

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5 minutes ago, VWAP said:

You bothered reading that dribble?

He read it while he was banging the dust mites out of your mom's kilt

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Just now, mikewof said:

 

What?

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Just now, VWAP said:

What?

Nothing important, just that the Seventh Fleet finds your mom to be a lovely lady.

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1 minute ago, mikewof said:

 

What?

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28 minutes ago, VWAP said:

What?

Just noted the lovely abundance of ethanol in your genetic fingerprint.

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23 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i just put mine in a plastic bag and beat it with sash weights..

harde corre anrchiste

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41 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i just put mine in a plastic bag and beat it with sash weights..

Winch handle in season.

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Unless you are fishing for tuna offshore, most folks don't need that much crushed ice. Agree it's good in drinks.

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4 hours ago, Tax Man said:

Winch handle in season.

Just be sure to wash the fecal matter off the Ramwells before using.

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There is no better ice for drinks than the nuggets produced by a Scotsman ice machine. 

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Crushed ice dilutes drinks WAY too quickly. You don't even want to use it in a shaker, it dilutes during the shaking. Other than precooling a glass while you make your drink or putting on your hurt knee, I can't think of a use. Single large cube is the way to go. This silicone ice tray makes a good sized cube that fits just fine in a rocks glass. Mine cost $1.99.

IMG_9483.jpg

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I got a pair of balls that you might be interested in Point. Wait that didn't come out right...  My GF's BFF gave me a silicone ice ball mold that works like you said to get the maximum cooling for minimum surface area and keep dilution down. 

Image result for ice ball mold

Image result for ice ball mold

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PB's on the money .

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6 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

I got a pair of balls that you might be interested in Point. Wait that didn't come out right...  My GF's BFF gave me a silicone ice ball mold that works like you said to get the maximum cooling for minimum surface area and keep dilution down. 

Image result for ice ball mold

Image result for ice ball mold

they are great......a little food coloring and you too can have blue balls ;-)

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I just 86'ed the silicone ball cube molds from the freezer about a week ago and ran to see if they had been sent out with the recycling. They were still on top of the frig but I now have new respect for them and may try freezing Squirt in them for my rum drinks. I was surprised to see Mike mention Squirt in the OP of this thread and I like it with my rum. Now the dilution thing makes me think that if I can just freeze my mixer of choice in the balls I might be on to something. When I lived in the Islands my favorite was 'Cruzan and Ting' but it is hard to find Ting here in the Lower 48. If you do it is expensive. Fresca was a pretty good substitute but it had Aspartame and Squirt does not. Neither have the fresh grapefruit flavor of real Ting from the Islands but I'll keep looking. 

NOT my web review!

 

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18 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

I got a pair of balls that you might be interested in Point. Wait that didn't come out right...  My GF's BFF gave me a silicone ice ball mold that works like you said to get the maximum cooling for minimum surface area and keep dilution down. 

Image result for ice ball mold

Image result for ice ball mold

I was a little worried for just a moment.......:huh:.......NTTAWWT..............

I have seen those round molds as well. When my squarebob spongepants cubes tray goes south I'll check those out.

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Point,

 

Just seeing if you were paying attention...

    I think the prismatic coeff of the balls over the cubes would be lower but we can get Bob Perry to advise on the optimum cube shape. I just need a positive stability index when drinking.

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2 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Point,

Just seeing if you were paying attention...

    I think the prismatic coeff of the balls over the cubes would be lower but we can get Bob Perry to advise on the optimum cube shape. I just need a positive stability index when drinking.

Cantte you juste freeze 1/2'' watere in bottum of glass? 

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2 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Cantte you juste freeze 1/2'' watere in bottum of glass? 

glass will shatter :(

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:lol:

I have no doubt the sphere is the superior shape, but whether it makes a practical difference in the drink I don't pretend to be able to calculate. In the meantime.............the practical testing continues..........

B)

IMG_0438.JPG

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ice cubes in beer work a treat ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,:P

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6 hours ago, Point Break said:

Crushed ice dilutes drinks WAY too quickly. You don't even want to use it in a shaker, it dilutes during the shaking. Other than precooling a glass while you make your drink or putting on your hurt knee, I can't think of a use. Single large cube is the way to go. This silicone ice tray makes a good sized cube that fits just fine in a rocks glass. Mine cost $1.99.

IMG_9483.jpg

With some drinks you want the dilution, it's part of the drink.

A cantarito is a great example ... when you first add the fruit juice to the tequila, you want that fast dilution from the smallest shards, because you factor that into your soda water top. Without that initial dilution, the CO2 is way too sharp for the fruit juice and it overwhelms the tequila. Then as you drink it, you need the larger shards with the slower melt to keep the drink cold but minimize the dilution because the fruit juice is denaturing the nucleic acids in the tequila, that's taking a lot of the "bite" out of the tequila, making it a little bit mellower, and also lowering the acidity of the fruit juice. So the initial small shards do the heavy lifting, and the larger shards gently walk the drink home at the end.

Large cubes are good when you don't want dilution, like for the heathens who put ice in their whiskey. (Heaven help those forsaken souls.)

In general, you want the dilution when the alcohol has a more rough, less consistent flavor, and then when you get the dilution you end up a flavor that can be better than the purer spirit. Gin is the ultimate classic example of that, and it's why crushed ice can make a G&T so perfect. The second you put a  QUNINE (!!!) into a cocktail, you've moved the primary mover of the drink from the spirit (i.e. the gin) to the bitter (i.e. the quinine). And that's why a G&T is not a martini, because the quinine is the thing that drives that bus. You can start with a very good gin, like Martin Miller or a good Beefeater, and it will often make only an average G&T. Yet, you stick a filthy gin like McCormick or New Amsterdam, gins that have about the average consistency of a Lewis Avenue speed freak, and you get these amazing G&Ts if you can get a decent tonic. (My trick is to add some BC aspirin powder to regular tonic, since it's now close to impossible to get pharma quinine, and the quinine content of even decent tonics like Fever Tree isn't all that good.)

When you get that dilution right after your pour, the harshness in the cheap gins gets dialed down to something resembling complexity. But when you don't have the dilution and you use a very good, gin, you then lose the quinine taste in the botanicals. The initial dilute is the compromise for a compromised drink, since the G&T was never invented as a cocktail to move alcohol, it was invented as a way to make quinine somewhat palatable. To me, the whole point of the G&T is honoring that quinine, honoring the bitter. And the way to do that is with a rougher gin and an initial dilute. A G&T isn't supposed to be smooth, it's not supposed to be consistent, it's supposed to be a delivery system for the quinine. And a cantarito, that's not a margarita, it's meant to be purchased in one place and consumed along the journey, which is the whole point of those little clay pots. The initial dilution and then longer lasting tail is the whole point of that drink. Not all cocktails are designed to be consumed while sitting on a sofa or a barstool.

I remember about 25 years ago, there was a bar in Alphabet City, I think it was called Lakeside Lounge, and they served beer in cans, like Schlitz, or Hamms. And it was kind cool, in a stupid way, you could get a beer for $1 and the bar still made a profit on those cans, because it was a cooler-to-hand kind of sale, they bartender didn't even need to pop off the cap. But it was really a monumentally stupid thing to do, regardless that us idiots who consumed those were probably some of the first hipsters. Beer in cans are designed to be consumed by the can, when sun is high and you're pulling shingles off a roof, or pulling the clutch plate on an old Dodge truck. The cans cool quick, and prevent glass shards on the worksite. Drinking a can of beer in a bar makes as much sense as drinking a glass of Shiraz from stem crystal while trying get an Evinrude de-winterized.

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1 hour ago, VOA said:

Lewmar backwards. Wofsey had a winch handle shoved up his arse and his proctologist read the imprint on his colon. 

Lewmar only has 1 L and no S.

His, and your, attempt at a SA staple is sad.

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7 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Lewmar only has 1 L and no S.

His, and your, attempt at a SA staple is sad.

I didn't want to make it too obvious, Grumpy needs a mental puzzle that he can solve now and then.

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aw shoot ice can be nice as long as it fits in a cup

that shit on the ground where you guys live SUCKS 

cffe55de6fbba5a141ad9dc0c6de8431-ice-tray-ice-cube-trays.jpg

AK-47-Gun-Bullet-10-slot-3D-Ice-_1.jpg

s-l640.jpg

New-3D-Grenade-Shape-Ice-Cube-Mold-Ice-Cream-Maker-Party-Drinks-Silicone-Trays-Molds-Kitchen.jpg_640x640.jpg

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I can't seem to find Squirt in any of the local stores.

No worry though, girlfriend seems to have plenty.

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19 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Anyone ever use one of these?

Image result for Scotsman ice machine

Never seen that one, just their larger units, and it's not on their website. Does it make nuggets (yay!) or cubes (boo!)?

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13 hours ago, mikewof said:

drinking a glass of Shiraz from stem crystal while trying get an Evinrude de-winterized.

Wowe! You firste saille of sesone muste be humdinggere!                                       :)

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14 hours ago, mikewof said:

With some drinks you want the dilution, it's part of the drink.

A cantarito is a great example ... when you first add the fruit juice to the tequila, you want that fast dilution from the smallest shards, because you factor that into your soda water top. Without that initial dilution, the CO2 is way too sharp for the fruit juice and it overwhelms the tequila. Then as you drink it, you need the larger shards with the slower melt to keep the drink cold but minimize the dilution because the fruit juice is denaturing the nucleic acids in the tequila, that's taking a lot of the "bite" out of the tequila, making it a little bit mellower, and also lowering the acidity of the fruit juice. So the initial small shards do the heavy lifting, and the larger shards gently walk the drink home at the end.

Large cubes are good when you don't want dilution, like for the heathens who put ice in their whiskey. (Heaven help those forsaken souls.)

In general, you want the dilution when the alcohol has a more rough, less consistent flavor, and then when you get the dilution you end up a flavor that can be better than the purer spirit. Gin is the ultimate classic example of that, and it's why crushed ice can make a G&T so perfect. The second you put a  QUNINE (!!!) into a cocktail, you've moved the primary mover of the drink from the spirit (i.e. the gin) to the bitter (i.e. the quinine). And that's why a G&T is not a martini, because the quinine is the thing that drives that bus. You can start with a very good gin, like Martin Miller or a good Beefeater, and it will often make only an average G&T. Yet, you stick a filthy gin like McCormick or New Amsterdam, gins that have about the average consistency of a Lewis Avenue speed freak, and you get these amazing G&Ts if you can get a decent tonic. (My trick is to add some BC aspirin powder to regular tonic, since it's now close to impossible to get pharma quinine, and the quinine content of even decent tonics like Fever Tree isn't all that good.)

When you get that dilution right after your pour, the harshness in the cheap gins gets dialed down to something resembling complexity. But when you don't have the dilution and you use a very good, gin, you then lose the quinine taste in the botanicals. The initial dilute is the compromise for a compromised drink, since the G&T was never invented as a cocktail to move alcohol, it was invented as a way to make quinine somewhat palatable. To me, the whole point of the G&T is honoring that quinine, honoring the bitter. And the way to do that is with a rougher gin and an initial dilute. A G&T isn't supposed to be smooth, it's not supposed to be consistent, it's supposed to be a delivery system for the quinine. And a cantarito, that's not a margarita, it's meant to be purchased in one place and consumed along the journey, which is the whole point of those little clay pots. The initial dilution and then longer lasting tail is the whole point of that drink. Not all cocktails are designed to be consumed while sitting on a sofa or a barstool.

I remember about 25 years ago, there was a bar in Alphabet City, I think it was called Lakeside Lounge, and they served beer in cans, like Schlitz, or Hamms. And it was kind cool, in a stupid way, you could get a beer for $1 and the bar still made a profit on those cans, because it was a cooler-to-hand kind of sale, they bartender didn't even need to pop off the cap. But it was really a monumentally stupid thing to do, regardless that us idiots who consumed those were probably some of the first hipsters. Beer in cans are designed to be consumed by the can, when sun is high and you're pulling shingles off a roof, or pulling the clutch plate on an old Dodge truck. The cans cool quick, and prevent glass shards on the worksite. Drinking a can of beer in a bar makes as much sense as drinking a glass of Shiraz from stem crystal while trying get an Evinrude de-winterized.

 

and if any of you mention whiskey stones..  there will be a special place in hell for you , where your whiskey will always be hot..

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3 hours ago, KnotRod said:

I can't seem to find Squirt in any of the local stores.

No worry though, girlfriend seems to have plenty.

And I like the way she brings her own mop!

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24 minutes ago, Jammer Six said:

Now I want to know what a whiskey stone is.

southern-homewares-bar-tools-sh-hd-10196

 

use theise insteade of ice, no dillutatione                                     :)

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22 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

southern-homewares-bar-tools-sh-hd-10196

 

use theise insteade of ice, no dillutatione                                     :)

Damaged teeth sure would explain your speech impediment :P

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6 hours ago, KnotRod said:

I can't seem to find Squirt in any of the local stores.

No worry though, girlfriend seems to have plenty.

HerShe Squirts ?

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$15k will get you 500lbs per day in the right conditions, seawater cooled, crushed ice pumped through a 3/4"ID hose up to 30 feet away.

20181120_122004 (1).jpg

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52 minutes ago, Coolerking said:

$15k will get you 500lbs per day in the right conditions, seawater cooled, crushed ice pumped through a 3/4"ID hose up to 30 feet away.

20181120_122004 (1).jpg

salt on the rim Not on the ice

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18 hours ago, Jammer Six said:

How do damaged teeth explain the way he types, though?

(I didn't even think of biting down on stone. Ouch.)

Maybe he has these glued to his fingers

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17 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Snaggs is actually Demosthenes

Related image

He better steer clear of anybody named Alexander then.................

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On 1/3/2019 at 6:27 PM, Point Break said:

Crushed ice dilutes drinks WAY too quickly. You don't even want to use it in a shaker, it dilutes during the shaking. Other than precooling a glass while you make your drink or putting on your hurt knee, I can't think of a use.

 

 

you fill your martini glass heaping over with crushed ice... pour splash of vermouth over the ice...    take your favorite martini liquor and shake it over ice cubes..  toss the crushed ice / vermouth into the sink.. fill with shaken liquor   perfect martini..

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Just now, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

you fill your martini glass heaping over with crushed ice... pour splash of vermouth over the ice...    take your favorite martini liquor and shake it over ice cubes..  toss the crushed ice / vermouth into the sink.. fill with shaken liquor   perfect martini..

I keep my martini glasses in the freezer. So far as vermouth goes.....I simply mumble vermouth near the glass and find that is sufficient.

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You guys and your desert-dry martinis. I use sweet vermouth. Flame on...

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

You guys and your desert-dry martinis. I use sweet vermouth. Flame on...

:lol:

I have no objection......liquor and cocktails tastes are like music.........lotsa fine stuff and your tastes are your own.

Just don't be a heathen and call it a "martini" please.

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4 minutes ago, Point Break said:

:lol:

I have no objection......liquor and cocktails tastes are like music.........lotsa fine stuff and your tastes are your own.

Just don't be a heathen and call it a "martini" please.

We understand each other.

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11 hours ago, Point Break said:

:lol:

I have no objection......liquor and cocktails tastes are like music.........lotsa fine stuff and your tastes are your own.

Just don't be a heathen and call it a "martini" please.

A martini has at minimum gin, an olive and at least a drop or two of vermouth. The heathen calls the glass of gin a martini because he doesn't like the odor of vermouth, or worse, uses vodka. Even a dry martini still has a little vermouth. Take out the vermouth completely, and you have a Gin and Olive. It's a delightful drink in every way, but it isn't a martini.

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On 1/3/2019 at 11:33 AM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i just put mine in a plastic bag and beat it with sash weights..

Did you get those out of a treasure chest?:ph34r:

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7 hours ago, mikewof said:

A martini has at minimum gin, an olive and at least a drop or two of vermouth. The heathen calls the glass of gin a martini because he doesn't like the odor of vermouth, or worse, uses vodka. Even a dry martini still has a little vermouth. Take out the vermouth completely, and you have a Gin and Olive. It's a delightful drink in every way, but it isn't a martini.

Oh good lord..okay, if you want to get precise, I drink a Gibson up. When I make my own I put a couple drops of vermouth (Noilly Pratt or Cinzano) into the glass out of the freezer, swirl it, dump it and pour the shaken (shaken - not stirred) Bombay Sapphire into the glass. Drop in two sour Mezzetta onions (olives are for barbarians especially when they are stuffed with various.........things). Two because you need one at the beginning and the other sits nicely flavoring the drink as it "matures" in the glass. Makes the last sip perfect followed by the second gin draped onion as a closer. That sir.......is a martini meant to be sipped....at least by civilized people.

Once in a while I succumb to 007's influence and have a Vesper as well.......but that's not a "classic" martini either.

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57 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Once in a while I succumb to 007's influence and have a Vesper as well.......but that's not a "classic" martini either.

Lucky man.

58709533adbbf8cd931860d15281c14d.jpg

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4 hours ago, Point Break said:

Oh good lord..okay, if you want to get precise, I drink a Gibson up. When I make my own I put a couple drops of vermouth (Noilly Pratt or Cinzano) into the glass out of the freezer, swirl it, dump it and pour the shaken (shaken - not stirred) Bombay Sapphire into the glass. Drop in two sour Mezzetta onions (olives are for barbarians especially when they are stuffed with various.........things). Two because you need one at the beginning and the other sits nicely flavoring the drink as it "matures" in the glass. Makes the last sip perfect followed by the second gin draped onion as a closer. That sir.......is a martini meant to be sipped....at least by civilized people.

Once in a while I succumb to 007's influence and have a Vesper as well.......but that's not a "classic" martini either.

Actually, your current vermouth method is 100% legit because the swirl and empty gives the entire drink more of the vermouth aroma than just adding the few drops to the liquid. (I sometimes do the swirl/empty method with pisco sours and Angostura Bitters, instead of putting a few drops on the foam, it's a better drink with that method, in some ways.)

I like the Davenport Martini, one of my favorites ..

- A few drops of Angostura Bitters with a couple ice shards, swirled and dumped.

- 2 and 3/4 shots of gin

- 1/4 shot dry vermouth

- 2 of the greasiest olives in the bowl. The greasier the better.

The Davenport is only as cold as the gin you add, I usually use nether the shaker, nor the ice, the bitters help deliver the gin even at room temperature.

I'm with you that I like cocktail onions with the Gibson, but the olive debris just loves the aroma of the bitters, cocktail onions are too sweet and not fatty enough to pair with Angostura to my tastes.

Do you remember the name of the book that introduced the Gibson? I remember the passage very well, an anthropologist woman was given a martini with an onion rather than an olive, because her coolies didn't have any olives. Like a spoiled little British bitch, she repulsed and insulted that beautiful drink. Then she tried it later and fell in love with it, realizing that her time in Africa could be fruitful if she only opened herself to the possibilities.

Anyone remember that book?

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2 hours ago, mikewof said:

Actually, your current vermouth method is 100% legit because the swirl and empty gives the entire drink more of the vermouth aroma than just adding the few drops to the liquid. (I sometimes do the swirl/empty method with pisco sours and Angostura Bitters, instead of putting a few drops on the foam, it's a better drink with that method, in some ways.)

I like the Davenport Martini, one of my favorites ..

- A few drops of Angostura Bitters with a couple ice shards, swirled and dumped.

- 2 and 3/4 shots of gin

- 1/4 shot dry vermouth

- 2 of the greasiest olives in the bowl. The greasier the better.

The Davenport is only as cold as the gin you add, I usually use nether the shaker, nor the ice, the bitters help deliver the gin even at room temperature.

I'm with you that I like cocktail onions with the Gibson, but the olive debris just loves the aroma of the bitters, cocktail onions are too sweet and not fatty enough to pair with Angostura to my tastes.

Do you remember the name of the book that introduced the Gibson? I remember the passage very well, an anthropologist woman was given a martini with an onion rather than an olive, because her coolies didn't have any olives. Like a spoiled little British bitch, she repulsed and insulted that beautiful drink. Then she tried it later and fell in love with it, realizing that her time in Africa could be fruitful if she only opened herself to the possibilities.

Anyone remember that book?

Not heard of a Davenport, interesting sounding drink. Seems like a lot of vermouth but I guess that's the point. Re: the onions being sweet....I stay away form the sweet onions as I just don;t think they pair well with the drink. You might find one of the more sour/tart onions more to your liking - Mezzetta. It seems to me it would pair well with the bitters. I use bitters in my Manhattans and Old Fashions though....orange bitters in my Manhattan.....and Luxardo cherries.

I've heard several versions of the "origin" of the Gibson. I have not heard of the book nor passage you recall. My favorite story is the tee-totaling diplomat who asked the bartender to substitute water in his drink with his contemporaries and he would know it was his "drink" because it had an onion rather than the traditional olive - Hugh Simons Gibson. There are others more plausible but I favor the diplomat.

Quote

Who invented the Gibson? Who didn’t? The gin-mill rumor mill has connected the drink with every Gibson in the Social Register. The most famous among them is the artist Charles Dana Gibson, falsely said to have received the inaugural cocktail after asking the man behind the bar at The Players to improve upon the martini. The 1964 New York Times obituary for stockbroker Walter Campbell Gibson, who died in his rooms at the Knick, skeptically noted this Gibson’s assertion that he originated the drink at the Ritz Hotel in Paris. And then there is the tale of the State Department’s Hugh Simons Gibson: Hugh allegedly liked to join the boys for martinis at the Metropolitan Club, but he didn’t like drinking as much as they did, and he didn’t feel comfortable just saying no, either. His solution was to switch to water after the first round, and he brought in the onion as a safeguard on the con—as a way to mark the drink as his alone, warding off anyone who might accidentally grab the wrong glass. The Hugh Gibson legend points us toward innumerable other genesis myths starring negotiators who want to keep clear heads while hiding their hands. These urbane legends figure the Gibson as a son of deceit.

All of the lies are highly intriguing, particularly because the earliest published recipes for the Gibson called for no garnish at all. A century ago, the Gibson sported neither an onion nor a reputation for stiffness; it was just one among many boring old martini-like compounds of gin and vermouth. But if we must attach the onion to a biography—if we must suppose that the cocktail as we know it sprang from the head of a namesake—then let’s please side with the family of Walter D.K. Gibson. Back when the fussy oldsters Fisher describes were still in short pants, W.D.K.G. was a member of the San Francisco Bohemian Club, that institution most famous for throwing an annual party combining the salient features of a Bilderberg conference and a skinny dip. His descendants attest that he “believed that eating onions would prevent colds.” Judging the veracity of that account, I find myself impressed by its being too dull to bother fabricating.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/drink/features/2013/martini_madness/gibson_cocktail_history_considering_the_martini_s_elite_oniony_relative.html

 

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