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hobot

Young Blood Transfusion

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Hey, it's kept Keith Richards looking youthful for the last 80 years or so. Why not give it a try?

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There's two born every minute.

Blood is blood.

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6358ec940cc61f914dfd71a90f18775d.jpg

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I have donated 115 times and have never recieved a cent, only juice and cookies and the occasional lunch room credit when I donated at work. The techs often say that my blood looks really good. It is a slightly differant shade of red than most.

 

20180711_195543.jpg

This is what 14 gallons of blood represents.

 

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my blood is probably about this color

 

image.png.5e1b098195d45cda5c48aa9785e2ded0.png

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9 hours ago, hobot said:

Hasn't this been a movie storyline a couple of times now?

Yes, butte the starre thet popullarized conseptte, Bella Lagosi, diede.

David Bowie an Cathy DeNueve tride bringe it back.                                            :)

 

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5 hours ago, Great White said:

I have donated 115 times and have never recieved a cent, only juice and cookies and the occasional lunch room credit when I donated at work. The techs often say that my blood looks really good. It is a slightly differant shade of red than most.

That's about 100 times more than me but I try. I like to think I've saved a couple of lives.

They really like my blood because it's O Neg - the champagne of blood. :D

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If you've had cancer (no matter how long ago) you cannot ever donate blood afterwards.

I miss my  cuppa orange juice and cookie.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

That's about 100 times more than me but I try. I like to think I've saved a couple of lives.

They really like my blood because it's O Neg - the champagne of blood. :D

I'm O Neg as well - universal donor, but a decade ago they decided that I cannot donate here, because I lived in the UK during the Mad Cow disease era.......... I'm really not certain of the scientific basis for that decision.

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I "WAS" AB- before a MC Crash @ 21

You Are what UR

Till UR what they gave you

How the Fuck does that happen ???

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29 minutes ago, Tunnel Rat said:

I'm O Neg as well - universal donor, but a decade ago they decided that I cannot donate here, because I lived in the UK during the Mad Cow disease era.......... I'm really not certain of the scientific basis for that decision.

They got crazy fussy after the HIV fuckup in the 80's that took the system away from the Red Cross.

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12 hours ago, hobot said:

If you've had cancer (no matter how long ago) you cannot ever donate blood afterwards.

I miss my  cuppa orange juice and cookie.

Likewise with Hep A. I don't really understand the stigma as my understanding is once you're recovered, you are immune to it (although not to B or C). Seems to me that would be a good thing to spread around.

I used to be a prolific donor.

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I have never given blood, and I doubt that I would pass muster. Having had Reiters Symdrome in '92, and Guillan-Barre in '02, I think I would be rejected without prejudice!!

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9 minutes ago, TWAT! said:

 

That said they gave human umbilical cord blood to eldery rodents.  I heard about something like this on NPR, but I'm pretty sure it was young rodents blood, not human??

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55 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

That said they gave human umbilical cord blood to elderly rodents.  I heard about something like this on NPR, but I'm pretty sure it was young rodents blood, not human??

Sorry, I did a quick Google and posted what I thought I was after. 

This one is more like the study I first saw. Interestingly, they  suggest that it's proteins in the old blood which causes the problem.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602897/blood-from-old-mice-makes-young-mice-decrepit/

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8 minutes ago, TWAT! said:

Sorry, I did a quick Google and posted what I thought I was after. 

This one is more like the study I first saw. Interestingly, they  suggest that it's proteins in the old blood which causes the problem.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602897/blood-from-old-mice-makes-young-mice-decrepit/

 

There was another study I heard about dementia, on NPR.  A brain scan study was done on people who eat a European diet, vs. American diet, of lots of meat, sugar, carbs, and highly processed foods.  The scan showed the American diet group had visible areas of change in their brains that is linked to dementia, in older people.

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On ‎1‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 7:42 AM, Willin' said:

Likewise with Hep A. I don't really understand the stigma as my understanding is once you're recovered, you are immune to it (although not to B or C). Seems to me that would be a good thing to spread around.

I used to be a prolific donor.

Yep; same here. I had hepatitis more than 35 years ago. At the time, the diagnostic was: "non-A, non-B"... I guess they knew there were other types of hepatitis but were not able to distinguish them yet… I still cannot give blood in the US, even though (if I read that well) my blood analysis show no excess of transaminase.

Same thing if you lived in the UK in the 80's. Because of fear of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (mad cow disease). My wife was living in the UK at that time. She cannot give blood in the US either. That is some nasty disease: incubation period can be longer than 50 years! And once it triggers, it can turn your brain to mush in 6 months.

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On 1/18/2019 at 5:42 AM, Willin' said:

Likewise with Hep A. I don't really understand the stigma as my understanding is once you're recovered, you are immune to it

You may be immune but the people getting your blood aren't.

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On 1/17/2019 at 7:58 PM, hobot said:

If you've had cancer (no matter how long ago) you cannot ever donate blood afterwards.

I miss my  cuppa orange juice and cookie.

Actually, not true. I’m classified as a “rare blood type” as I’m o net plus negative for about a dozen different subtypes that make my blood perfect for preemies, those with compromised immune systems, etc. Red Cross told me they take blood from survivors of solid tumors 1 year after treatment ends. Those who had blood cancers (leukemia, lymphoma, etc) are off limits permanently. 

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2 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Actually, not true. I’m classified as a “rare blood type” as I’m o net plus negative for about a dozen different subtypes that make my blood perfect for preemies, those with compromised immune systems, etc. Red Cross told me they take blood from survivors of solid tumors 1 year after treatment ends. Those who had blood cancers (leukemia, lymphoma, etc) are off limits permanently. 

My info is from personal experience that is now a little over 25 years old.

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I think we should flip this equation so us old farts can sell our blood to the young under the premise that "Hey it's gotta be good if it lasted this long!:

 

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2 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Actually, not true. I’m classified as a “rare blood type” as I’m o net plus negative for about a dozen different subtypes that make my blood perfect for preemies, those with compromised immune systems, etc. Red Cross told me they take blood from survivors of solid tumors 1 year after treatment ends. Those who had blood cancers (leukemia, lymphoma, etc) are off limits permanently. 

 

12 minutes ago, hobot said:

My info is from personal experience that is now a little over 25 years old.

One of the questions on the screening is "have you ever had cancer of any Kind". I suppose an affirmitive answer triggers additional screening. 

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8 hours ago, Great White said:

 

One of the questions on the screening is "have you ever had cancer of any Kind". I suppose an affirmitive answer triggers additional screening. 

From my personal experience finishing 18 months of treatment, including chemical, radiation and surgery last summer. I asked the Red Cross to stop calling based on the beleif that the lifetime exclusion was in force. They told me of the one year exclusion. From their web page:

Quote

Cancer

Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been more than 12 months since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Lower risk in-situ cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin that have been completely removed do not require a 12 month waiting period.

Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

I’ll start donating again in June as long as the CTs still show good news. 

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I first gave blood as a teenager in South Africa in the 1970s, and promptly collapsed on the sidewalk outside because being macho I refused the cookies and tea. But then I moved to the US in the 1980s and they will not accept me because close to 25% of south africans are HIV positive, and although I test negative apparently they think the risk of me picking up HIV here is too great. I spend a couple months in SA each year, but as I am not a resident they will not take my blood here either.

On the other hand, my Mom with chronic lymphocytic leukemia progressed to hemolytic anemia had perhaps 50 pints in the first six months of last year to keep her going, with no obvious ill or good effects, given all of that must be from younger people as she is 94 years old (her chemotherapy with a biologic monoclonal antibody targeting lymphocytes in June last year worked well enough that she is 6 months without a transfusion, remarkable).

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I used to give blood whenever asked. Maybe 10-12 times total. Then I had a tiny melanoma. Excised with no complications 20 years later. Still on "deferred" status

My doctor had a discussion with me about plasma infusions from people <25 years old. Apparently people fly in from all over to some infusion clinic in San Marcos TX to get it. (Between Austin and San Antonio). Wild stuff

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I was a platelet donor for many years.  Donated every 4 to 6 weeks.  But after cancer I thought I was barred.  I need to contact the red cross and see what the story is.

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5 minutes ago, sailm8 said:

I was a platelet donor for many years.  Donated every 4 to 6 weeks.  But after cancer I thought I was barred.  I need to contact the red cross and see what the story is.

From Red Cross eligibility requirements.   https://www.redcrossblood.org/faq.html#eligibility

Quote

Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been more than 12 months since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Lower risk in-situ cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin that have been completely removed do not require a 12 month waiting period.

Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

Ooops.....sorry I didn't notice IB had already posted......my bad.

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PB thanks!  I had and encapsulated kidney tumor.  Kidney and tumor gone for last 9 years.

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But.............the current shortage is critical....if you can..........please do it.

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Just now, sailm8 said:

PB thanks!  I had and encapsulated kidney tumor.  Kidney and tumor gone for last 9 years.

Congratulations!!

 

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I had never donated blood in my life. Thought about it often tough.  Then my nephew lost both legs in a barge accident late last year, and I participated in the next local blood drive.  I will be donating every six weeks now for as long as I can.  You never know who's life you will be saving.  Several donators saved his, and I will do my part.

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37 minutes ago, BOKSAROX said:

I had never donated blood in my life. Thought about it often tough.  Then my nephew lost both legs in a barge accident late last year, and I participated in the next local blood drive.  I will be donating every six weeks now for as long as I can.  You never know who's life you will be saving.  Several donators saved his, and I will do my part.

One thing to consider, particularly if you have anything resembling a "rare" blood type, is donating "double reds".  Basically they collect a pint, centrifuge it to pull out the red blood cells and pump the plasma back in.  Then they take a second batch and do it again.  They end up with packed red cells ready for the freezer.  Needle is slightly bigger and the actual time on the table is a little longer. It does leave you somewhat more anemic than a standard donation so you can only donate that way every 12 weeks and that gives you 2 donations while saving the fairly excruciating wait times every 6 weeks.  

When I was in treatment, I had a 4 day, high dose, inpatient chemo every 3 weeks.  Basically as soon as my counts started back up, I was readmitted for the next round.   Last couple of rounds, I was so anemic that I was at high risk of having to delay or stop treatment.  Doc gave me 2 units of packed red cells over a 4-5 hour period and I could feel the effects during the infusion.  Donated blood truly is the gift of life.  

Brings up my only complaint with the RC.  Despite being a regular donor and having a Red Cross ID card, I make an appointment, show up and end up waiting in line, followed by the same old questions and review.  I've asked why they can't make that a bit quicker for repeat donors.  A simple "Has your health changed or have you traveled overseas since your last donation" followed by a BP check and HGT test and on the table should be sufficient.  For 30 minutes on the table, it often takes 2 hours or more here, which screws with the work day pretty badly.     

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2 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Brings up my only complaint with the RC.  Despite being a regular donor and having a Red Cross ID card, I make an appointment, show up and end up waiting in line, followed by the same old questions and review.  I've asked why they can't make that a bit quicker for repeat donors.  A simple "Has your health changed or have you traveled overseas since your last donation" followed by a BP check and HGT test and on the table should be sufficient.  For 30 minutes on the table, it often takes 2 hours or more here, which screws with the work day pretty badly.     

This - the wasted time turns a lot of people off.

It doesn't take 2 hours here but it is a lot of unnecessary repetition.

Another one that really annoys me - I have hard to find veins and if they get the flow started and then the vein collapses or the needle slips out they won't put it back in again - everything stops until next time.

I realize they have to be very cautious - after the HIV mess in the 80's - but they really seem to go overboard now.

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They aren't.

Here.

Of course here the sane and intelligent people are running things.

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So this thread may  save a life....literally

I've quit trying to give  since being told i was "deferred" due to a melanoma that was treated 20 years ago.

They caught it so early the lab said it was the smallest they'd ever seen. Stage 0

I saw the eligibility info above and called, and now I'm no longer "Deferred" and can donate again..

 

Thanks PB!

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I am also in the group prohibited from donating as I lived for 8 months in the UK 30 years ago.   I was a regular donor of O- blood.... until I was banned. 

My problem is that, after 30 years, my risk of CJD is probably about the same as someone who spent 2 months in the UK 30 years ago.   The cut-off criteria is 6 months. So the 2 month guy can donate but I can't.  I don't buy that logic. 

Note that people in the UK are allowed to donate blood in the UK.  Otherwise there would be no blood there at all.  So the risks must be well understood by now. 

And I would guess the risks of banning otherwise suitable donors (like those who spent a short time in the UK decades ago) may at some point exceed the risk of not having enough blood. 

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Certainly understands it.

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On 1/17/2019 at 7:58 PM, hobot said:

If you've had cancer (no matter how long ago) you cannot ever donate blood afterwards.

I miss my  cuppa orange juice and cookie.

If you go to India, you are rejected.

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16 minutes ago, hasher said:
On 1/18/2019 at 12:58 AM, hobot said:

If you've had cancer (no matter how long ago) you cannot ever donate blood afterwards.

I miss my  cuppa orange juice and cookie.

If you go to India, you are rejected

They're not keen if you've spent time in South America or Asia and picked up any mosquito borne diseases either, both times I've offered I was politely turned down. 

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On 1/17/2019 at 10:11 AM, SloopJonB said:

There's two born every minute.

Blood is blood.

Well, you may want to stay away from the cut rate joints pushing blood products...

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-02-08/12000-chinese-blood-treatments-found-be-contaminated-hiv

 

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Contaminated ain't quite the same thing as thinking that a young persons blood is the fountain of youth.

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Just say'n you best know where the stuff came from...

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