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Service Civique found in the north atlantic

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Jersey CG:

On Wednesday evening at 1709hrs, Jersey Coastguard received a phone call from a 300m container ship called Mol Empire who had discovered a 20m sailing vessel with apparently no persons on board. Communications with the Captain were lost before a location could be ascertained, but one thing we were certain of is that the huge container ship was not in our 600NM² area of responsibility. A quick internet search of AIS data providers indicated that the vessel was somewhere in the Atlantic ocean on passage from Savannah, USA to Le Harve in France. As AIS uses VHF frequency, which does not travel very far, the last time an AIS base station picked up her signal was 8 days ago, so she could be anywhere. Our first thoughts were to see if our French or UK counterparts could identify the ship’s location which proved negative, but fortunately the communications with the ships’ Captain were re-established and an accurate position was relayed before communication was lost again. The vessel was some 1,500NM away from Jersey so co-ordination for the incident was passed onto the National Maritime Operations Centre in the UK who would have the necessary resources to initiate any SAR mission so far offshore. The Captain of the Mol Empire had circled the small sailing vessel a few times and tried to launch his rescue craft to see if anyone was onboard but the sea conditions would not allow him to do so. But he was able to take some photographs of the vessel and email them via satellite to Jersey Coastguard, Cross Jobourg MRCC & UK Coastguard. Cross Jobourg was very quick to identify the sailing vessel which had been a participant in the Route de Rhum race which took place during the first two weeks of November 2018. The female skipper of the vessel had encountered extremely stormy conditions during the race and was rescued but had to abandon her craft. Due to the persistence & ingenuity of the ship’s Captain, advances in offshore telecommunications and collaborative working between 4 Coastguard agencies, this incident was resolved in under 90 mins without a single SAR unit having to be dispatched. Thank you to all involved. It’s never a dull day here in the Operations Room.

 

 

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At least it didn't take 8+ years give and take to find it and now have it be salvaged.  Great efforts and good on those how made excellent happen with this!

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My ole man used to tell me, "Kid, the boat's tougher than you are".      Good on the M.O.L. containership and the shore units.

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It's looking pretty intact for having been two months in the winter North Atlantic...

(tell me again why the skipper had to be rescued...?)

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I see a broken bowsprit but the bow looks to be in excellent shape otherwise, standing rigging looks to be all there, etc.

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Some hull damage reported, it seems. 

Not to cast blame but, the only two vessels in one large piece of ocean, collide?  one "lookout" asleep below for a couple hours, and the other doesn't notice a small sailboat (any AIS signal from the latter?)   

 

Oh well, easy for me to keep lookout and navigate from a desk...

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According to the article in OuestFrance, the two vessels were on almost parallel courses, and hit each other side to side. She had already had some damage from an earlier storm at the outset of the race. (Structural cracks that were apparently repaired in Spain before re-starting?).  The freighter essentially came up alongside while she was asleep (not sure if it was day or night) and WHAM!  A leak seems to have been started, and fixed, but it seems there were other issues - not specified-  as well. She apparently got off the boat about 45 minutes after getting hit.  If the boat is recovered we may learn more.  It's still a good ways out there, though it looks like the Gulf Stream is moving it back to the starting line.

 

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The collision opened up the hull / deck joint for about 4.5 meters, aft of the mast. As it happened at a point when yet another serious low was coming down on that patch of water, the conservative choice was to get off the boat while rescue was an option. 

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In looking at the picture more closely, I don't think that the sprit is damaged.  Its just canted 90 degrees to port.

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On 1/19/2019 at 6:21 PM, Rail Meat said:

In looking at the picture more closely, I don't think that the sprit is damaged.  Its just canted 90 degrees to port.

Good morning gents, Mike,

We have been approached by salvage brokers to go and get her and have an ocean going tug on standby in SW UK.  

If we get the contract I'll need to brief the skipper how to make a safe connection - your advice appreciated.

32 mtr/50T bollard pull ocean going tugs and carbon don't mix well.

My thinking :  and first we have to be able to get onto the thing :

1) lash the tiller(s) in the centre.

2) rig a soft bridle going back to the primary winches.

3) rig a strong rope loop at the forestay attachment to feed the bridle through to keep her tracking straight.

Attach soft bridle to synthetic tow rope 2 x 200 meters (70 mm) then connect into the 44 mm steel main tow wire to keep it from sinking too much.

Is the mast deck-stepped or keel stepped ?

Thanks.

 

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Good info Leo, thanks.  We have the contract so will be mobilizing the tug in a few hours.

She has damage on stb side, hull/deck join opened up,  from the chain plates to 3.5 meters aft of that when she slammed into the container vessel.

Salvors, tugs and fragile yachts do not mix well so I have to make doubly sure that we get the connection right and deliver her back to her owners in no worse condition than she is in now.

 

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Be aware it is a mark 2, so study the photos for winch position etc.

Do not forget to ask Lombard if the bowsprit hole in the hull and rope is strong enough, I did build a Lombard design like this only smaller and would hoist the whole boat on that rope if needed. Maybe it can be tied in to the tow rope as security.
Other strong point is aft off the cabin, the corner there between deck and cabin is very strong. 
And if two tillers still there, it will track nicely when towed.
And looks like there is a hole after the mast for water ballast, look at 315 seconds, knock it off and could be an opening for a tow rope, and together with the double entrance and winches behind it, and mainsailtrack .....

Any more details about the crack on the hull ?

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What are the economics of salvaging her? 

If you towed her at a speed of 9-10 knots (which i doubt) it would take a week to cover 1.500 Nm. Add another 5-6 days for the tug to reach her and you are talking about hiring an ocean going tug for a good 12 days or so  under continous use. That  must be a lot of money. 

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Whatever happened to opening your seacocks to sink the vessel before abandoning her, so she doesn't pose a risk to navigation? Can't imagine her nav lights are still working, and it could ruin a fishing vessels day, running into her on a cold, dark night.

Leaving her afloat on the chance you might salvage her, versus the real risk to human life in a collision just seems selfish.

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52 minutes ago, Omer said:

What are the economics of salvaging her? 

If you towed her at a speed of 9-10 knots (which i doubt) it would take a week to cover 1.500 Nm. Add another 5-6 days for the tug to reach her and you are talking about hiring an ocean going tug for a good 12 days or so  under continous use. That  must be a lot of money. 

Her present position is approx. 375nm west of Falmouth, currently drifting rapidly East @ 2.7 knots.   She has covered quite a bit of distance to the North since she was abandoned 480 Nm West of Cape Vincente on 15th November.

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2 hours ago, LeoV said:

Any more details about the crack on the hull ?

Negative,  the cargo vessel only photographed her port side.  All intel we have is that it is from the stbd chainplate running aft for 3.5 mtr.

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Good luck.. keep us posted.

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4 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Good luck.. keep us posted.

Will do. Have asked the skipper to take a few pics on arrival and ops during connection.

We have 3 swimmers, guccy bits of string and a rubber duck o/b organized by charterers to do the difficult bits.  

Fingers XX'd.

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On 1/23/2019 at 1:20 PM, Jackett said:

Whatever happened to opening your seacocks to sink the vessel before abandoning her, so she doesn't pose a risk to navigation? Can't imagine her nav lights are still working, and it could ruin a fishing vessels day, running into her on a cold, dark night.

Leaving her afloat on the chance you might salvage her, versus the real risk to human life in a collision just seems selfish.

I´ve never ever heard of a proper French skipper (racing, fishing or shipping) doing this, it is a navy thing... If you do it on purpose I suspect that you could even get in trouble for breaching some environmental laws.

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Found her.  08:22,  2 swimmers o/b

Connect and get out of there to Cork otherwise there will be nothing left to connect to in 24 Hrs.

P1020578

 

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Nice... looks valuable enough.

I wonder what size of tug ?
 

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35 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Nice... looks valuable enough.

I wonder what size of tug ?
 

Not one of our youngest ones but built like the proverbial outhouse.  35 x 10 mtr 5.2 mtr draft.  370 Tonnes.  50 ton bollard pull. 

MTS Viscount

 

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Nice, towing with someone on the yacht ? there must be a snack box inside :)

Not much damage to see on this side. But some marks on the hull deck line. Could be worse then it looks.
ETA Cork ?

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I expect dinghy launch at sea is not a regular work action ? It is a tiny one ...

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Well done, and I hope the tow goes well. I presume the 24 hour concern is the incoming storm system. As least you have following winds.

We had an incident here in South Africa a couple of years ago where the overturned hull of a catamaran that was lost in a cyclone during a delivery to Australia, with three men on board lost, eventually turned up off the South African coast. The navy attached a tow and only succeeded in sinking it, devastating the families.

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46 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Nice, towing with someone on the yacht ? there must be a snack box inside :)

Not much damage to see on this side. But some marks on the hull deck line. Could be worse then it looks.
ETA Cork ?

I expect dinghy launch at sea is not a regular work action ? It is a tiny one ...

No, not leaving anybody on there.  If the poo hits the fan we have to fish a body out of the drink in deteriorating Wx conditions.

Well aware of salvage attempts gone wrong and gear swept off the deck, boats/people crushed and so on so little rubber duck not that bad in the current conditions.

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The marvels of internet ... live action. Thanks for updating.
24 hrs for the shit starts to fling.
The owner must be so happy...

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Pretty stoked that we are involved and that we are able to play a small part in helping her fight another day ;)

The miseryguts here in the office haven't got a clue ... lol

 

Still horrified by the pics how BP was 'towed' into La Coruna.

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38 minutes ago, Laser1 said:

Pretty stoked that we are involved and that we are able to play a small part in helping her fight another day ;)

Good luck with that. How is your tow line attached to the sailboat?

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Any idea (rough numbers) what you guys will charge for the salvage / tow? 

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Kinsale anchor spot at the moment, they must have made it.

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Nice work.  How was the vessel located?  Was a locator beacon still working? 

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4 hours ago, LeoV said:

Kinsale anchor spot at the moment, they must have made it.

Yup,  Now in the lee of Kinsale. All is well.

Depending on weather will make the hop across the Irish Sea tomorrow or later.

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5 hours ago, LeoV said:

Kinsale anchor spot at the moment, they must have made it.

Doesn't look too flash where she was 36 Hrs ago.

Wx 1700 26-1

 

 

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Well fucking done.

 

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Is the boat being returned to the woman who abandoned it?

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36 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Is the boat being returned to the woman who abandoned it?

I'm not sure she owned it.   I think some boats are owned by syndicates and are chartered for the event.

We have to deliver it to a yard in France.

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Any word yet on the actual condition of the interior?  i.e. was there much water ingress from the damaged area?  (the boat looks pretty 'light' so one might be hopeful....)

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22 hours ago, Veeger said:

Any word yet on the actual condition of the interior?  i.e. was there much water ingress from the damaged area?  (the boat looks pretty 'light' so one might be hopeful....)

The convoy is now on final approach to Falmouth with 3/4 hr to go.

I'll pop over tomorrow am to have a look.

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Nice work, good weather window, surprised the jib stayed rolled without wraps for 2 months in N Atlantic winter. Fortunate.

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Pleased to report she is safe alongside in Falmouth pending insurance assessment and repair yard decision.

She's a bit banged up and some delamination on the stbd side iwo deck/hull join and stbd side deck. Rigging is fully intact.

No water ingress to speak of and she has done well on her own in the N. Atlantic for 2 months.

She'll live to fight another day.

Laser 1 out.

WP_20190129_09_26_38_Pro

 

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Thanks Laser for the updates. She looks good enough after a few months at sea.

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17 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Laser 1 out.

Well done Laserus, must have been a fun exercise.

L2L!

 

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19 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Well done Laserus, must have been a fun exercise.

L2L!

 

Hi Fiji, how's it hanging :lol:

Yeah, makes a difference from barges and jack-up rigs.

Will do !! & thanks.

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