Multihauler

New Corsair 880

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Something new coming from Corsair.........

http://mkto-q0149.com/Q0cY04X0TT2pi0d5D00t0S0

An all-new Corsair, and the legitimate heir to the trimaran revolution started by the Hall-of-Fame anointed F-27, in 1986. The pinnacle of trimaran design, this built from-the-ground-up Corsair has full boat systems – meaning electric lighting, refrigeration, manual or electric toilet, and even air conditioning is available. A small generator complements a lightweight air conditioning or heating unit, and providing
comfortable electrical independence when cruising in hot or cold climes. In true Corsair fashion, that generator and air conditioner are removable to reduce excess weight when racing, or reduce trailer weight when on the road. And this is where the 880 is the revolutionary boat it promises – all of that comes in a folding, trailerable package well below the trailering weight limit of most passenger cars.  Racer, Cruiser, Trailer-sailer, and the successor to the boat that started it all...

*********************************

Cheers!!!

-MH

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Comparison:

                        880              Airplay
LOA:              8.8m                9.2m
BEAM:           6.8m                6.88m
Beam Fold:    2.5m               2.50m
Mast Len:     12.0m             12.50m
Weight:         1660kg           1345kg
Mainsasil:     33.9 sq/m      37.8 sq/m      
Jib:                17.6 sq/m       21.37 sq/m
 
-MH
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3 hours ago, Multihauler said:

Comparison:

                        880              Airplay
LOA:              8.8m                9.2m
BEAM:           6.8m                6.88m
Beam Fold:    2.5m               2.50m
Mast Len:     12.0m             12.50m
Weight:         1660kg           1345kg
Mainsasil:     33.9 sq/m      37.8 sq/m      
Jib:                17.6 sq/m       21.37 sq/m
 
-MH

Sail areas of the racing version are bigger than Airplay at 38 and 24 m2

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Light air flyer, better stay close to shore!

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I wouldn't put too much faith in the listed weights for either boat.  And, ya gotta laugh when the advo says, "...well below the trailering weight limit of most passenger cars."   Dunno if you've looked for a new tow recently but "most" passenger SUVs today can't tow that much-especially japon/korea makes.   But, they are trying to sell boats.  It does look like it would be a nice cruiser or race boat in the R version.

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I agree it looks like the Airplay: it's got that same silly "side-deck" on the main hull that robs a lot of living space from inside so that part seems like a poor design decision.

It looks pretty good otherwise

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18 hours ago, Libertist said:

 

I like tris.  Might even like yours.  But its not cool for you to post your stuff all over various thread and especially a thread about a different tri.

So yea, as others have said, buy an ad if you want to promote your stuff.

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Really like the rear section of the floats, should stop the squatting effect in breeze that Farriers/Corsairs have done in the past.

Good luck with the project!

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On 1/19/2019 at 7:32 AM, Jimmycrab said:

Looks sharp, wonder what price tag is?

I have heard in Australia, fully optioned at $200k and should be here early next year.

Should have everything a 970 has in it however significantly cheaper, lighter, easier to trailer and looking sharper.

First 12 months of build slots are already full.  

Cant wait to see on in the flesh.

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On 2/8/2019 at 8:20 PM, Tornado_ALIVE said:

I have heard in Australia, fully optioned at $200k and should be here early next year.

Should have everything a 970 has in it however significantly cheaper, lighter, easier to trailer and looking sharper.

First 12 months of build slots are already full.  

Cant wait to see on in the flesh.

since Libertist mixed up the thread, what boat are you taking about, the Corsair 880 or the Libertist?

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14 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

since Libertist mixed up the thread, what boat are you taking about, the Corsair 880 or the Libertist?

The 880.  Good video here on the 970 which will give you a bit of an idea what to expect with the 880.

 

 

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crickets,

was a rumor it was going to appear at this years KC?

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What happened to this?  I thought we'd see something by now. Problems at the factory? Boat weighs 3 tons with all the gadgetry they promised and is slow as a condomaran?

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Still nothing but crickets. Perhaps a reconsideration of the volume distribution in the floats after the 760 flipped in Florida on a moderate day last year?

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Thanks!  Can anyone comment on the joint for the beam shown in blog post #9. If it's a shoe-box type it looks strong enough, but if a butt joint, how is it strong enough?

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Looks very similar to the latest Farrier designs, should be plenty strong. These boats have been sailing a while and the beams are pretty well understood.

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15 hours ago, Shu said:

Thanks!  Can anyone comment on the joint for the beam shown in blog post #9. If it's a shoe-box type it looks strong enough, but if a butt joint, how is it strong enough?

you mean the beam to ama, its in a tapered socket with a bolt. Nice way to do that joint.

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Sail,

I agree, the tapered socket is a good joint.  I was referring, however, to the longitudinal joint between the top and bottom pieces of the beam.

-Steve

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16 hours ago, Shu said:

Sail,

I agree, the tapered socket is a good joint.  I was referring, however, to the longitudinal joint between the top and bottom pieces of the beam.

-Steve

I'll ask but they may be a reverse bagged section like a mast so one piece

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9 hours ago, Sailabout said:

I'll ask but they may be a reverse bagged section like a mast so one piece

top glued on to internal flages

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Internal flanges make sense, but one of the photos seems to show a top piece fresh out of the mold with an external, raw-edged flange.

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4 hours ago, Shu said:

Internal flanges make sense, but one of the photos seems to show a top piece fresh out of the mold with an external, raw-edged flange.

I was referring to the Grainger RAW

Corsair ones are flat base with top flanged foam filled on the 24 cant say about the others

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The first Corsair 880 has splashed.. looks awesome.  Hope she's light and fast.

98150445_10223393200964010_7264844504379686912_n.jpg

98605337_10223393200724004_2290211407020425216_n.jpg

99427494_10223393200483998_532833183180259328_n.jpg

98041147_10223393200243992_2575742413406470144_n.jpg

97677913_10223393201244017_5116553033160851456_n.jpg

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I think I like this boat. At first I compared it to my F85SR. Bad idea. It is almost twice the sailing weight. It is more like the Raw 30. Big floats, flat bottoms and standing headroom which of course increases surface area and weight. The sport rig is TALL, a whole meter taller than the rig on an F85SR and even taller than an F31R. So I think the cruising version will be great. It seems, by the photos to be able to carry the weight and will probably be pretty fast in breeze even with the cruising rig. Bit of a beast in sport version but I’m keen to see how it turns out. This is a breakout for Corsair. Good for them.

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Looks nice, light and responsive.. I wonder if it has any interior? 

 

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On 2/7/2019 at 2:35 PM, Libertist said:

 

still looking for that advertisement

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I've heard that the 880 #1 is coming to Seattle.  Hopefully we can view it during one of our multihull club meetings in the future.

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6 hours ago, offtherails said:

No, it's a fairly light weight small tri, not a Tardis nor even a Tesseract

What I meant was.. I wonder if its still a bare shell inside in these pics/videos.. or whether they've installer the interior which could add a few hundred kgs.

 

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2 hours ago, can-UK said:

What I meant was.. I wonder if its still a bare shell inside in these pics/videos.. or whether they've installer the interior which could add a few hundred kgs.

 

I think most of the interior is glued into the hull prior to installing the deck/coachroof, and a lot of it is structural. Of course, cushions, stove, toilet, fuel, water, etc. could all be missing.

The launch photos show one ama completely out of the water, so it's floating pretty high.  There probably is some stuff missing

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It looks like Corsair is marketing this boat primarily as a cruiser and I’ll bet it is a good one. They give a pretty in depth weight tally in their brochure that shows a sailing weight for the base boat of 1803 kilos. Ad a few options and 2000 kilos comes up pretty fast. 

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7 minutes ago, D Wayne G said:

It looks like Corsair is marketing this boat primarily as a cruiser and I’ll bet it is a good one. They give a pretty in depth weight tally in their brochure that shows a sailing weight for the base boat of 1803 kilos. Ad a few options and 2000 kilos comes up pretty fast. 

Their weight study compares it to a Corsair 28, which they show as 1602 kg for the base boat.  That's heavier than published values for the Corsair 28CC.  Perhaps the Vietnam Corsair 28 was heavier than the Chula Vista, Calif. version?  Anyway, the weight study shows it neck and neck with the Corsair 28 until they add 3% or 50 kg for "magin" (perhaps a misspelling of "margin", which I would call "contingency"). Even compared to the old published weight for the Corsair 28, it should have a similar displacement/length, given the longer effective waterline.

I hope in normal sailing trim both floats touch the water. It seems a shame to give away some heeling angle right from the start.

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1 hour ago, Shu said:

I hope in normal sailing trim both floats touch the water. It seems a shame to give away some heeling angle right from the start.

That makes it hard to tack in light air

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Looks like a fun boat, I wish I had better understanding as to  how it will preform relative to the prior designs. Any sophisticated wild ass guesses out there?

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Sweet!  Now just need a few F31 AC owners to put theirs up for sale to get the new 880 so I can buy their F31!

 

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how do you get the water out of the front of an ama

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19 hours ago, Sailabout said:

how do you get the water out of the front of an ama

Psshhaw!  These boats are made out of fiberglass and stuff.  Fiberglass never leaks!

 

 

/s

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21 hours ago, Sailabout said:

how do you get the water out of the front of an ama

Assuming there's an access cover in front of the beam you could use presumably use one of these:


quickie-sponge-mops-55mb8-64_1000.jpg

 

Or if you fold first it should flow towards the beam bulkhead but then you can't do it from the boat when in the water...
A small hose going to the lowest point?

Also, is there a crash bulkhead somewhere near the front, or a bunch of solid foam coming a way back from the bow?

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On 5/19/2020 at 2:37 PM, eastern motors said:

That makes it hard to tack in light air

Good point. My Corsair 28 floats have much more rocker than the 880, so it isn't much trouble to tack. That also makes the water in the forward part of the ama pool against the bulkhead, where there is relatively easy access from an access cover (if my arms were 3 inches longer).

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On 5/20/2020 at 1:37 AM, eastern motors said:

That makes it hard to tack in light air

I'm not sure about that..  Tacking a Hobie 16 in light air is harder than taking a modern F18.

A Hobie 16 has low volume high rocker floats and sits IN the water.

An F18 has high volume low rocker floats and sits ON the water.

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2 hours ago, Shu said:

Good point. My Corsair 28 floats have much more rocker than the 880, so it isn't much trouble to tack. That also makes the water in the forward part of the ama pool against the bulkhead, where there is relatively easy access from an access cover (if my arms were 3 inches longer).

I use a cheap wet vac on my F28R.  Using the crevasse tool, it's very easy to suck the float completely dry.  

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16 hours ago, can-UK said:

I'm not sure about that..  Tacking a Hobie 16 in light air is harder than taking a modern F18.

A Hobie 16 has low volume high rocker floats and sits IN the water.

An F18 has high volume low rocker floats and sits ON the water.

I thought I was quoting something about dihedral on trimarans.

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On 2/8/2019 at 6:35 AM, Libertist said:

C5AE59C7-E004-47F8-B8EE-D74A849E67DE.jpeg

You've been plastering this shitheap on so many threads that are totally inappropriate. take it off and pay for advertising you cheap skate. i saw someone have a go at you for doing something similar on facebook and you argued the point. this is a corsair thread.  

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On 5/18/2020 at 4:45 AM, can-UK said:

The first Corsair 880 has splashed.. looks awesome.  Hope she's light and fast.

98150445_10223393200964010_7264844504379686912_n.jpg

98605337_10223393200724004_2290211407020425216_n.jpg

99427494_10223393200483998_532833183180259328_n.jpg

98041147_10223393200243992_2575742413406470144_n.jpg

97677913_10223393201244017_5116553033160851456_n.jpg

Boat looks really cool.  Hope they have much success with it.

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I'm glad to see that Corsair has abandoned the aft-sloping coamings. That is just one of the ergonomic horrors of my Corsair 28's cockpit. The coaming should be a nice place to sit with a shorty tiller extension and see the jib tell-tales while still being in the cockpit.  Maybe people won't feel the need to retrofit chairs on top of the coamings for this model.

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On 5/22/2020 at 1:39 AM, square top said:

You've been plastering this shitheap on so many threads that are totally inappropriate. take it off and pay for advertising you cheap skate. i saw someone have a go at you for doing something similar on facebook and you argued the point. this is a corsair thread.  

 

 

170951AB-72CF-429D-871E-141B3134D581.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Libertist said:

 

0CB004E0-41DC-4892-9CA4-09EB2FBCAA0D.jpeg

No thank you.  I would rather have a Farrier or Corsair... especially a Corsair now that Ian has left this earth.  Your approach to pimping and polluting threads about other boats has convinced me and I suspect many others to not do business with you.

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On 5/18/2020 at 4:45 AM, can-UK said:

The first Corsair 880 has splashed.. looks awesome.  Hope she's light and fast.

98150445_10223393200964010_7264844504379686912_n.jpg

98605337_10223393200724004_2290211407020425216_n.jpg

99427494_10223393200483998_532833183180259328_n.jpg

98041147_10223393200243992_2575742413406470144_n.jpg

97677913_10223393201244017_5116553033160851456_n.jpg

I saw some notices that Corsair was doing a webcast of some sort with interested parties to introduce the boat.  Sure looks like a sweet ride.

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3 hours ago, Wess said:

No thank you.  I would rather have a Farrier or Corsair... especially a Corsair now that Ian has left this earth.  Your approach to pimping and polluting threads about other boats has convinced me and I suspect many others to not do business with you.

It really is an ugly little thing. 

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Truth be told I don't think its ugly though the red color is maybe off-putting to some.  Its more their marketing approach.  They got no traction with their own thread so now they just pollute other threads like this one about a nice mid-sized Corsair. 

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So back to our regularly scheduled programming. 

These new models from Corsair (Pulse, 760, 880) all seem to follow the same philosophy; large volume amas with very flat deadrise in the transom to promote planing.

I wonder the wind range that they are targeting and if they may be alienating some of their core base? These design decisions are typically found in offshore boats that primarily go downwind and get pushed hard.

Of course these "powerful" looks are beautiful to look at, but what about the light upwind putting around crowd?

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48 minutes ago, Floating Duck said:

So back to our regularly scheduled programming. 

These new models from Corsair (Pulse, 760, 880) all seem to follow the same philosophy; large volume amas with very flat deadrise in the transom to promote planing.

I wonder the wind range that they are targeting and if they may be alienating some of their core base? These design decisions are typically found in offshore boats that primarily go downwind and get pushed hard.

Of course these "powerful" looks are beautiful to look at, but what about the light upwind putting around crowd?

Corsair is a production company so they follow the market based on size and cost.  They don't have a "name" hull designer, nor foil designer, nor sailplan designer.  So it is a bean counter driven organization.   Not a fan of the company since Ian left it.  If I had to buy one (I don't), I'd make weight a condition of purchase especially if I were going to race one.  No reason to buy a dog right out of the gate.

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7 hours ago, Floating Duck said:

So back to our regularly scheduled programming. 

These new models from Corsair (Pulse, 760, 880) all seem to follow the same philosophy; large volume amas with very flat deadrise in the transom to promote planing.

I wonder the wind range that they are targeting and if they may be alienating some of their core base? These design decisions are typically found in offshore boats that primarily go downwind and get pushed hard.

Of course these "powerful" looks are beautiful to look at, but what about the light upwind putting around crowd?

Very pertinent comment. Ian refused to have such straight rocker lines for all round upwind and downwind performance. More importantly, the rocker in the aft section is what makes his boats so safe downwind in wild conditions. 

The straight rocker boats I have raced on get away with it by adding huge sails and have to be built really light or they stick to the water in light winds. This boat has the rags but we will see how heavy the reality of this build delivers. Good on them for having a go.

Peter

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9 hours ago, Floating Duck said:

So back to our regularly scheduled programming. 

These new models from Corsair (Pulse, 760, 880) all seem to follow the same philosophy; large volume amas with very flat deadrise in the transom to promote planing.

I wonder the wind range that they are targeting and if they may be alienating some of their core base? These design decisions are typically found in offshore boats that primarily go downwind and get pushed hard.

Of course these "powerful" looks are beautiful to look at, but what about the light upwind putting around crowd?

I sail a 760, it performs across a spectrum of conditions.  Last week I had a friend with no sailing experience on the tiller in 12-14kts of wind and we hit 16.5kts consistently. She had no idea what a bid deal that is, just said it "steers so easy". In a breath of wind it will get going at least wind speed if not a little more - only problem is you can only go across the wind. I've owned a few corsairs and I will never go back to a high rocker float - just look old fashioned and don't perform. It's crap that that the rocker makes them any safer in a seaway. Oh yeah - I outsail an F31 and an F28 on the lake I sail on - not even close and I've left an F27 way behind as well. If you are hung up on the "look" get an old boat or the F22, if you want faster, simpler to set up and better ergonomics spend the money and get the new boat. Looks badass at the dock to.

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Free2speed,

Do you sail your boat only on lakes, or do you get out on the ocean (or great lakes)? I think the rocker is to keep a wave from picking up the back end of the boat and stuffing the bow. Higher-volume-forward floats and the elevation of the float transom relative to the bow help, but is it enough to overcome that high volume float transom, with it's dynamic lift?

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On 6/2/2020 at 10:47 PM, Wess said:

No thank you.  I would rather have a Farrier or Corsair... especially a Corsair now that Ian has left this earth.  Your approach to pimping and polluting threads about other boats has convinced me and I suspect many others to not do business with you.


Stop it. 
It was just answer. We do pay adverts. Just. 

Sorry you do not understand. 

 

PS

We do not sell boat to the fans of fancy revers bows ;)
 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Libertist said:


Stop it. 
It was just answer. We do pay adverts. Just. 

Sorry you do not understand. 

 

PS

We do not sell boat to the fans of fancy revers bows ;)
 

 

 

No; you stop it.  Stop polluting threads about other boats.  Go start your own thread about your boat. Oh yea... you did and got no traction. Maybe that is a hint?

And while I have nothing against reverse bows I already own a large trimaran with conventional bows. 

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Well... at least I attempted to get this thread back on track with my question about hull shape above.

If I had the cash I would certainly go for the Corsair over the other boat...

I'll be upgrading from a Pulse to a used 880 in half a decade, FOR SURE.

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On 6/4/2020 at 1:10 AM, MultiThom said:

Corsair is a production company so they follow the market based on size and cost.  They don't have a "name" hull designer, nor foil designer, nor sailplan designer.  So it is a bean counter driven organization.   Not a fan of the company since Ian left it.  If I had to buy one (I don't), I'd make weight a condition of purchase especially if I were going to race one.  No reason to buy a dog right out of the gate.

Seriously Ian Farrier and Corsair parted company in 1991 when Walton owned it, then rejoined Paul Koch and parted company again in 2000.  20 years and a different owner ago.

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2 hours ago, Factor said:

Seriously Ian Farrier and Corsair parted company in 1991 when Walton owned it, then rejoined Paul Koch and parted company again in 2000.  20 years and a different owner ago.

sure but very little changed from Ian till the current owner where a steady stream of upgrades have started coming along with the first new boat, the 880

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here's the projected polars, thought they would have had a bigger apparent wind vmg lobe?

image.png.60d24a77692cfd9a9c708b7c0a2c82bd.png

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12 hours ago, Dead air said:

here's the projected polars, thought they would have had a bigger apparent wind vmg lobe?

image.png.60d24a77692cfd9a9c708b7c0a2c82bd.png

Nice.  Curious what software you used and which sails were imputed on the various courses.  Be nice to see the same side by side of the 880 sport versus an F31 OD.

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5 hours ago, MultiThom said:

Nice.  Curious what software you used and which sails were imputed on the various courses.  Be nice to see the same side by side of the 880 sport versus an F31 OD.

No idea on software, it was a screen grab from a Corsair webinar on the 880. I did wonder if it included a kite as thats an optional extra....

The change in shape around 90 degrees certainly suggests a screacher

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The red lines on the polar diagram represent the output from the designer’s VPP for the 880 Sport.

The black lines are for the non sport version.  

The Sport 880 (red lines) has  a taller mast and larger mainsail and Genoa, a screecher and asymm as standard.  It’s faster.

The Cruise 880 (black lines) are for the cruising version shorter mast, smaller mainsail and smaller self-tacking jib, and without the optional sprit, screecher and asymm.  

 

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I emailed Corsair with a question about the berth dimensions.  The aft cabin is only 38” wide. That’s a wide single berth, but not a double.  And the vberth is too narrow for two sets of feet.  

I don’t see how you could sleep 5 adults on the 880 or where a couple could share a berth comfortably as its currently configured. 

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From what little I see of the head, I think it is out of step with the rest of the boat.  This is a F A S T racing/cruising boat.  It has standing headroom for goodness sake! Why does the toilet slide out from under the forward berth? If I get up in the middle of the night (and I do, always have) from somewhere else in the boat to use the head, I will need to slide the toilet out from under the the forward berth. No matter how separated the head compartment is from the forward berth, anyone sleeping up there is going to hear that toilet sliding out from under their head, plus whatever normal head noises are made, then the toilet sliding back under their head. 

The other alternative is to leave the toilet in the aft (slid out) position. But then the forward berth occupants need to climb over the toilet to get in and out of their berth. The forward berth appears to be the most convenient berth at anchor, but not with that head arrangement. 

Both the Corsair 970 and some of the larger boats have the toilet permanently mounted off-center, with a bit of space between it and the bulkhead that marks the aft end of the forward berth. This seems a better solution.  Perhaps the 880's lines are too fine in this area for anything but a center-mounted toilet?

Sure love the position of the head in my Corsair 28CC, on the starboard side of the companionway.  Do something like that on the 880, then there is room to move the forward berth aft a bit to give Judy room for two sets of feet. One couple can then have a head, a dinette, and a forward berth without having to convert anything.  Two couples can use the head and two double berths with reasonable privacy in the head, only needing to convert the dinette.

I love everything else I've seen so far. I even think I can avoid the boat rocking from ama to ama at anchor by loading all the gear in one ama.

My wife, by the way, will continue to deal with much less than standing headroom in our 28CC in order to have our nice, enclosed head. The 880's head is truly a no-go for her.

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3 hours ago, Shu said:

From what little I see of the head, I think it is out of step with the rest of the boat.  This is a F A S T racing/cruising boat.  It has standing headroom for goodness sake! Why does the toilet slide out from under the forward berth? If I get up in the middle of the night (and I do, always have) from somewhere else in the boat to use the head, I will need to slide the toilet out from under the the forward berth. No matter how separated the head compartment is from the forward berth, anyone sleeping up there is going to hear that toilet sliding out from under their head, plus whatever normal head noises are made, then the toilet sliding back under their head. 

The other alternative is to leave the toilet in the aft (slid out) position. But then the forward berth occupants need to climb over the toilet to get in and out of their berth. The forward berth appears to be the most convenient berth at anchor, but not with that head arrangement. 

Both the Corsair 970 and some of the larger boats have the toilet permanently mounted off-center, with a bit of space between it and the bulkhead that marks the aft end of the forward berth. This seems a better solution.  Perhaps the 880's lines are too fine in this area for anything but a center-mounted toilet?

Sure love the position of the head in my Corsair 28CC, on the starboard side of the companionway.  Do something like that on the 880, then there is room to move the forward berth aft a bit to give Judy room for two sets of feet. One couple can then have a head, a dinette, and a forward berth without having to convert anything.  Two couples can use the head and two double berths with reasonable privacy in the head, only needing to convert the dinette.

I love everything else I've seen so far. I even think I can avoid the boat rocking from ama to ama at anchor by loading all the gear in one ama.

My wife, by the way, will continue to deal with much less than standing headroom in our 28CC in order to have our nice, enclosed head. The 880's head is truly a no-go for her.

is the sport and the cruising version going to have a different layout re the toilet I wonder?

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15 hours ago, Sailabout said:

is the sport and the cruising version going to have a different layout re the toilet I wonder?

There was a comparison chart presented in the webinar. There was no mention of the head. The standard has a main bulkhead door, whereas the sport version does not. The door would provide some increase in privacy of the head. That's all I could find. I e-mailed my concerns above about the head arrangement to Corsair. I'll convey whatever I hear back from them.

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On 5/19/2020 at 9:43 PM, Sailabout said:

how do you get the water out of the front of an ama

My tri is has an inspection ports in both the ama bulkheads where the beams are located and I have never needed to get water out of the compartments foreward or aft of those bulkheads in twenty nine years - where is the water coming from?

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5 hours ago, boardhead said:

My tri is has an inspection ports in both the ama bulkheads where the beams are located and I have never needed to get water out of the compartments foreward or aft of those bulkheads in twenty nine years - where is the water coming from?

I notice if you put heavy grease or even vaseline it reduces the amount of water then gets in so it seems its the poor quality hatch is the problem?

What type of inspection ports do you have?

How often do you have water over the ama?

How do you vent your amas?

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The inspection ports are 6" round, threaded with O ring seals (HA I think) They are mid height in the bulkheads, in the amas. The threads are dry and only very, very. lightly screwed shut - ie - not air tight 

I never get water in the amas.

The amas are accessed through large, size 70 Lewmar Ocean hatches that are left cracked and only dogged down when sailing. The acrylic lenses were replaced with foam cored, glass skinned panels from new. When opening the hatches after sailing there is normally an inrush of air when the latches ore released.

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2 hours ago, boardhead said:

The inspection ports are 6" round, threaded with O ring seals (HA I think) They are mid height in the bulkheads, in the amas. The threads are dry and only very, very. lightly screwed shut - ie - not air tight 

I never get water in the amas.

The amas are accessed through large, size 70 Lewmar Ocean hatches that are left cracked and only dogged down when sailing. The acrylic lenses were replaced with foam cored, glass skinned panels from new. When opening the hatches after sailing there is normally an inrush of air when the latches ore released.

Sure you dont get water because you have the right hatches on the wet side. ( non vented compartment on a boat sounds like a trouble unless managed very well?)

2500+ corsair and other small multi sailors have suffered with those crap plastic screw hatches for years.

Its just a cost thing.

I am thinking of glassing up the ones that are only there to fasten the beams which will probably never be unfastened

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On 6/8/2020 at 5:45 PM, Shu said:

From what little I see of the head, I think it is out of step with the rest of the boat.  This is a F A S T racing/cruising boat.  It has standing headroom for goodness sake! Why does the toilet slide out from under the forward berth? If I get up in the middle of the night (and I do, always have) from somewhere else in the boat to use the head, I will need to slide the toilet out from under the the forward berth. No matter how separated the head compartment is from the forward berth, anyone sleeping up there is going to hear that toilet sliding out from under their head, plus whatever normal head noises are made, then the toilet sliding back under their head. 

 

Aren't the majority of these sold to men of a certain age?  Being able to use the head easily (every 20 min) seems important.

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6 hours ago, Sailabout said:

2500+ corsair and other small multi sailors have suffered with those crap plastic screw hatches for years.

Its just a cost thing.

I am thinking of glassing up the ones that are only there to fasten the beams which will probably never be unfastened

That's how the searail is built.  A glassed conforming patch is put in place over the accesses but it is only bedded in with 5200 in case you ever have to redo those bolts.

Still leaks in the amas though; probably from the stern screw hatches that are there to flood on purpose if you capsize and want to right the boat again.  

I just use the amount of water in the amas after a sail as a reminder of how much fun I had, more water, more fun.  Same as I did in my F242.  The F242 was harder to get the water out from on the trailer since you had to sponge or siphon it out.  The Searail you just let it all drain to the stern and siphon the remainder below the hatch.  

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Sad compromise really, I would find those leaks totally unacceptable.

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If we can’t get a good nights sleep, the layout is impractical for a couple for cruising and vacationing. We won’t be buying one. 

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3 minutes ago, boardhead said:

Sad compromise really, I would find those leaks totally unacceptable.

What trimaran do you own?

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One I designed and build myself that was done right, very tough for professionals to even stay in business building these boats properly at acceptable prices.

 

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42 minutes ago, boardhead said:

One I designed and build myself that was done right, very tough for professionals to even stay in business building these boats properly at acceptable prices.

 

Got a picture?

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When we bought our Corsair 28CC over three years ago, the price of the 28R was considerably higher. That made sense to me, given the 28R's expensive carbon fiber mast.  A recent review of asking prices on Yachtworld.com and Sailboatlistings.com showed the 28CC to be a little more expensive than the 28R. This held true whether I considered all boats, only boats listed in the US, threw-out the outliers, or otherwise tried to compensate for anything that made the comparison unfair. Are the 28CC's holding their value better because of the nicer layout and enclosed head?

We have yet to see photographs of the interior. Perhaps Corsair is still trying to figure out the best layout.  I doubt they are going to offer 4 different options like they did for the 28, or half a dozen or more options like they did for the 31. It makes better production sense to keep the options limited.

Corsair is really touting this as a comfortable to cruise boat, with options for air conditioning, refrigeration, etc. In my view, all those things are niceties, but if they don't get the berthing and head issues right, it's just going to be another sportboat with the head and berths merely thrown in as afterthoughts.  I've always thought a sailboat needs to be designed to sail first and foremost, and then you take the resulting space and carefully design a functional interior. I really hope Corsair gets this right.

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On 6/4/2020 at 6:25 PM, Shu said:

Free2speed,

Do you sail your boat only on lakes, or do you get out on the ocean (or great lakes)? I think the rocker is to keep a wave from picking up the back end of the boat and stuffing the bow. Higher-volume-forward floats and the elevation of the float transom relative to the bow help, but is it enough to overcome that high volume float transom, with it's dynamic lift?

Just like to sail the lake but occasionally get down to the sea of cortez out of san carlos.  Have made the trip in my 242 and the 760.  The 242 crossed over to the Baja, 76 nm, in 7 hours. The boat averaged 11-12 kts. Last fall, in similar conditions, I crossed to Baja, 95 km  in 8 hrs steady 13-14 kts hit 17 a few times. The telling difference for me was I had to hand steer most of the first trip as the lee ama on the old 242 digs horribly in the puffs and you have to anticipate and adjust for the puff or the boat speed gets dragged way down. In the 760, the auto pilot did just fine even under the screecher, off the wind, up to about 20kts.  Beautiful sailing, great boat speed, NO DRAMA.  When the auto pilot started to over correct in the puffs, I tied in a reef and went back to letting the auto pilot steer. I could have hand steered but just wanted to hang out. Boat speed dropped but still double digits. Here is a video of the boat under reef:

I don't feel the higher volume floats give up anything in the way of sea keeping ability, maybe make it better as the boat can take the puffs better and more boat speed improves rudder response.  The 880 will perform the same or better.  There is a reason all modern trimarans are looking so similar - it works. The new Corsair sees where trimaran design is going and I salute them for taking the path that puts boats like these on the water for less than the million or more you could spend getting that "perfect boat"

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5 hours ago, boardhead said:

Sad compromise really, I would find those leaks totally unacceptable.

I guess I'm just sanguine about leaks.  Probably because of the years spent on a submarine that always leaked, so I figure it is pretty normal for water to get into the people tank.  

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