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Kris Cringle

Bonded Stores, a term from pre EU days.

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There are 2 curious cabinets on my sailboat that was finished in 1960-61, in Denmark. At the head of each pilot berth, there is a good sized hold with a keyed locking door on each. Those are the only lockers that aren't fitted with finger holes and latches. One has liquor bottle holes in the base, the other a high shelf.

 

You can see the unhandy (compared to finger hole- latches) locking doors port and starboard - pilot berths. 

1782346841_Bondedstores.thumb.jpg.79bef31501b5522442f0f756cf88d873.jpg

Years ago, a Brit I know, who was in the building industry during that era, said he thought the locking cabinets may have been designed for 'bonded stores'.  

 

Liquor, tobacco and what not goods that had a customs duty to pay between most of Europe, pre EU. I surmise goods could be locked, noted on documents, and no duty paid until consumed the stuff. EU didn't end tariffs between countries until the late 60's. 

 

Anybody old enough to have any experience with bonded stores and locking holds? Very little online except a mention for both small boats and airplanes.

 

Makes me think this old customs and duty owed stuff could be reborn with Brexit, 

 

 

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Locked, documented, **and**  a customs' seal affixed.

Not just in Europe but any port around the world.... seal not to be broken until beyond the 3 mile limit.

Around the UK coast where the ship may have spent 6 weeks unloading and then back loading HM Customs would come down once a week  and open the bond to make an issue... a carton of fags and a bottle of spirits per head....

 

Old? Not me........ mind you people have been offering me their seat on the bus and addressing  me as 'caballero' for some time now...

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Caballero?

They are obviously unaware that you are a member here.

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Beautiful woodwork.

I’ve heard of (not experienced) two instances. Prescription drugs kept locked up to satisfy USCG, and there was one episode of Delos, where they were required to keep their Iridium Go locked up under seal in Indian waters.  Although it turned out they had a back way into the cabinet without breaking the seal.  Maybe not the best idea to demonstrate that on worldwide TV, unless you’re really, really sure you’re never going back to that country? 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

There are 2 curious cabinets on my sailboat that was finished in 1960-61, in Denmark. At the head of each pilot berth, there is a good sized hold with a keyed locking door on each. Those are the only lockers that aren't fitted with finger holes and latches. One has liquor bottle holes in the base, the other a high shelf.

 

You can see the unhandy (compared to finger hole- latches) locking doors port and starboard - pilot berths. 

1782346841_Bondedstores.thumb.jpg.79bef31501b5522442f0f756cf88d873.jpg

Years ago, a Brit I know, who was in the building industry during that era, said he thought the locking cabinets may have been designed for 'bonded stores'.  

 

Liquor, tobacco and what not goods that had a customs duty to pay between most of Europe, pre EU. I surmise goods could be locked, noted on documents, and no duty paid until consumed the stuff. EU didn't end tariffs between countries until the late 60's. 

 

Anybody old enough to have any experience with bonded stores and locking holds? Very little online except a mention for both small boats and airplanes.

 

Makes me think this old customs and duty owed stuff could be reborn with Brexit, 

 

 

SUCH a nice boat. Lovely. 

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Looks like something they'll need in Britain starting this spring, with Brexit. Give a listing price in Euros, of course, so that you don't lose out when the UKL drops off the cliff. 

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7 hours ago, Cisco said:

Locked, documented, **and**  a customs' seal affixed.

Not just in Europe but any port around the world.... seal not to be broken until beyond the 3 mile limit.

Around the UK coast where the ship may have spent 6 weeks unloading and then back loading HM Customs would come down once a week  and open the bond to make an issue... a carton of fags and a bottle of spirits per head....

 

Old? Not me........ mind you people have been offering me their seat on the bus and addressing  me as 'caballero' for some time now...

Some idiot bought more gin on sale in NZ than he should have then answered the questions wrong. Fiji customs seemed confused, and had no interest in these stickers when we cleared out, though they were still there.

20151113_104702.thumb.jpg.b8b19bfb0761d2b02cdcf5fa6ba02459.jpg

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8 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

There are 2 curious cabinets on my sailboat that was finished in 1960-61, in Denmark. At the head of each pilot berth, there is a good sized hold with a keyed locking door on each. Those are the only lockers that aren't fitted with finger holes and latches. One has liquor bottle holes in the base, the other a high shelf.

 

You can see the unhandy (compared to finger hole- latches) locking doors port and starboard - pilot berths. 

1782346841_Bondedstores.thumb.jpg.79bef31501b5522442f0f756cf88d873.jpg

Years ago, a Brit I know, who was in the building industry during that era, said he thought the locking cabinets may have been designed for 'bonded stores'.  

 

Liquor, tobacco and what not goods that had a customs duty to pay between most of Europe, pre EU. I surmise goods could be locked, noted on documents, and no duty paid until consumed the stuff. EU didn't end tariffs between countries until the late 60's. 

 

Anybody old enough to have any experience with bonded stores and locking holds? Very little online except a mention for both small boats and airplanes.

 

Makes me think this old customs and duty owed stuff could be reborn with Brexit, 

 

 

I have no answer to that question, but could we see a picture from the outside of the boat? Inside is awesome and I am really curious!

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Back in 64 got a job on purse seiner going to Alaska for the season salmon fishing. The skipper asked what booze and cigs I would like for my time on the boat. Explained it was duty free could only be consumed while offshore. We went up the inside passage thru Canadian waters, it was under lock and key for the trip up. We had engine problems on the way up, the Canadian authorities came aboard, inspected the boat, were interested in the seastores and made it clear we were confined to the boat except for the skipper. Before we could leave a couple of days later we had to be cleared out, again the major deal was the seastores.  and that they were all accounted for.

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9 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

I have no answer to that question, but could we see a picture from the outside of the boat? Inside is awesome and I am really curious!

Thanks! 1961 Alden Challenger. Alden's first fiberglass hull and deck design. Hull and deck cast in the UK, the rest of the boat built and finished in wood in various yards (most, like this were finish at the Poul Molich yard in Denmark). 

1898128434_Cairntablelampboatdusk.thumb.jpg.7ae2e62ef56f607c40cbc8d343f6599c.jpg

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18 hours ago, Cisco said:

Locked, documented, **and**  a customs' seal affixed.

Not just in Europe but any port around the world.... seal not to be broken until beyond the 3 mile limit.

 

and we never broke the seal .... instead we just unscrewed and took out the lock as a whole, seal on top of it, that way we could open the big door to the big booze & ciggie locker, the cook was a true master of this skill as he was managing that locker.

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I served on the big grey boats when alcohol was sold on-board duty-free.  At the time (as I recall) beer was about 35 cents and shots were a quarter.  

While that seems like a nice perk, it really was quite detrimental in some cases.  People drunk on duty, extreme drinking, alcoholism, etc.  

Cigarettes were also sold duty free and, with the limited ventilation of a ship, some compartments were just blue with smoke. 

Different times.  

 

PS:  Mr Cringle, that is one very nice looking yacht.  Very, very well done.  

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6 hours ago, bugger said:

 

PS:  Mr Cringle, that is one very nice looking yacht.  Very, very well done.  

+1

well maybe apart from the dodgy dodger... For the rest, very sweet!

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14 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Thanks! 1961 Alden Challenger. Alden's first fiberglass hull and deck design. Hull and deck cast in the UK, the rest of the boat built and finished in wood in various yards (most, like this were finish at the Poul Molich yard in Denmark). 

1898128434_Cairntablelampboatdusk.thumb.jpg.7ae2e62ef56f607c40cbc8d343f6599c.jpg

Beautiful lines!!! The woodwork is awesome too (though I am happy it is not mine, especially in the CA sun). 

The dodger... yeah, not so sure Alden would approve of that

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Alas, the dodger design is driven by a wooden curb mounted on the house. The curb is straight and runs the entire width, so you get a box as opposed to the more shapely 'bomber' style. The curb is very old and may be original. I thought of starting from scratch when we replaced it 10 years ago but I cheaped out and went with the exisiting bows and curb. 

I sort of think dodgers started more boxy before the form evolved. At any rate, there aren't many good angles to photograph this dodger,...

 

The maker and I at least rounded all the panel corners softening it a bit. But from the bow, it's a square box. It is low though and you can easily see over it, you fold like a pretzel to get under it. 

I couldn't sail very long without a dodger.  Form is way behind function here.                                                                                     

 

 

 Dodger2.jpg.27dd87d3f8857361241fa918a4f05c2b.jpg

 

 

 

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On 1/20/2019 at 1:58 PM, Cisco said:

 

Old? Not me........ mind you people have been offering me their seat on the bus and addressing  me as 'caballero' for some time now...

Age has a way of sneaking up on you. In Hawaii they call me Uncle, here I'm Don Johnny .

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Have you noticed how they hide your year of birth deeper and deeper down the list when you fill a form on the internet? Bastards.

And aren’t the Popes looking young these days?  

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Bonded Stores also relates to anything that goes BANG!

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I remember in the mid-1980s stocking up in Gibraltar.  We had so many cases of spirits in the fo'c'sle the boat, a S&S Swan 41, sailed like a submarine.  To balance out the weight forward, the aft cabin had a pallet stack of beer.  To get into the port berth one had to squeeze between the beer and the deckhead.  Kept us going for a couple of months.

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