willp14335

I got my first keelboat

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After a few months saving up my cash and looking at various boats I purchased my first keelboat yesterday. She is a 1986 Catalina Capri 22. She was not sailed for 19 years and stored inside, before being sailed the past three seasons by the previous owner. The boat is in very nice shape for its age and came with a rebuilt trailer which looks like new.

I got the boat for cruising the San Juan islands, but I now plan to do some racing as well after finding out she has the optional performance package with harken deck gear and a real traveller. It also has three headsails ranging from blade jib up to 155% (two that are only two years old) and a new spinnaker. This is the fin keel version, which sails a lot better than the shoal draft wing keel.

Needless to say I was super excited so I splashed it as soon at I got the boat back to Anacortes (it was a 6 hour drive away). The test sail was good. It was light so I put up the main and the big 155 percent genoa. I'm happy with the sailing performance, 5.5 to 6 knots with a few bursts to 6.5 in around 10 gusting 12. I'm looking forward to trying out the spinnaker, it feels and looks like it's never been used. I still need to come up with a name for the boat as I'm not fond of the old name "Wind-Passer."

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You've put on some weight and age, I almost didn't recognize you.

Have you considered "Bumfuzzle"?

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Great score.

Congratulations.

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It appears to have a venerable Honda. Don't let it sit. It will always run if you're always running it.

5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

You've put on some weight and age, I almost didn't recognize you.

I almost recognized this pic:

5 hours ago, willp14335 said:

 

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As his dad.

Have fun with the boat, Will P!

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Congrats, Will! If you ever get down Shilshole way, PM me.

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Nice boat. I hope we get to raft it to the mother ship in a year or two!

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Looks like you gt a really good deal Will. Jill was asking me what the boat was like so I had her Google it. The ones that we saw for sail were far higher priced than yours and not as well equipped. I think the asking price was a very fair price.

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I delivered one of them last year for a client.

I was surprised at how well built it was and it turned out to be a great daysailor for the guy and his family. 

Now you have to start to tweak it before you sell it for the bigger boat. It’s kind of the usual start to an addiction ...

 

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Looks like a fun ride! Enjoy it!

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1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

Looks like you gt a really good deal Will. Jill was asking me what the boat was like so I had her Google it. The ones that we saw for sail were far higher priced than yours and not as well equipped. I think the asking price was a very fair price.

Old, stored indoors, and a fair price are a great combo. I'd predict he can play with it for a few years and sell it for about what he paid without ever putting many $ into it. It's about as close to free boating as you get.

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I used to sail those for fun racing at Windworks at Shilshole. They are fun boats and the fin keel does point better. Did you get a tall mast?

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Great for wednesdays racing at AYC!  See you out there!

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

I used to sail those for fun racing at Windworks at Shilshole. They are fun boats and the fin keel does point better. Did you get a tall mast?

I think it's the standard mast. I'd have to know the measurement of both. Next time I put it on the trailer I can measure the mast. With the big Genoa the boat seemed to power up fairly easily. 

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congrats on the purchase. have fun.

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3 hours ago, willp14335 said:

I think it's the standard mast. I'd have to know the measurement of both. Next time I put it on the trailer I can measure the mast. With the big Genoa the boat seemed to power up fairly easily. 

It made a difference on the club boats, but they also have those outfitted with 110% jibs instead of large genoas.  It's odd that they race them against each other because they have boats with a mix of masts, rig heights, and keels.

It's a fun boat and I like the simple layout and construction.  I think it's a good choice compared to most budget 22 boats and it sounds like you got a great deal.

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Fun fun fun...

 

FYI - this is the last time you will ever be treated nicely on SA by the majority of posters...

 

 

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Will, 

We're spoilt for choice in Oz for trailer sailers, but we don't have Capri's out here, and I must say that's a shame, that's a great looking 22'. 

I used to have a Gary Mull designed 26' that I loved to bits. adding a new sail and feeling like you've just dropped in a turbo, or mucking around with weight placement to slide past your opposition in the puffs in light airs, they really reward you with the simple joy of just going sailing. 

I hope she gives you many fond memories mate, congratulations!

SB

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Will, 

We're spoilt for choice in Oz for trailer sailers, but we don't have Capri's out here, and I must say that's a shame, that's a great looking 22'. 

I used to have a Gary Mull designed 26' that I loved to bits. adding a new sail and feeling like you've just dropped in a turbo, or mucking around with weight placement to slide past your opposition in the puffs in light airs, they really reward you with the simple joy of just going sailing. 

I hope she gives you many fond memories mate, congratulations!

SB

 

 

 

Thanks! 

 

The boat does kind of feel like a big dinghy in how it responds to weight and input at the helm. At some point I might get a new main, as that sail is original with the boat and a little stretched out. 

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From a fellow Capri 22 owner (859)... Congrats!!! We purchased ours secondhand shortly after I turned 30. I remember thinking "this'll do for now". Now I am closing in on 40 this year and we "still" have her, and still loving her to bits. Decent sailing, plenty of control lines for fiddling, great cockpit for acres sailing, and (relatively) inexpensive and easy to maintain.

Enjoy!

Cheers, 
Charlie

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Looks great - congrats!  Those are great boats; tons of them down here in SD.  When I had my Catalina 22 I envied the smaller cabin sportier Capri's with their nice big cockpits.  Great daysailer and weekender!  

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Thanks for the kind comments. I'm spending the night aboard right now, have a heater going to keep warm. 

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Congrats on the purchase, Will. Looks like a great purchase and I 100% empathise with the impulse to spend the night aboard already. May you enjoy many more nights aboard after the day's sailing. 

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And so the addiction takes hold.

“I’ll just stay on it one night”...;)

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Will, I dug up a picture for you to try and emulate. But before anyone praises me for keeping her so light and floating on her lines, the depth at the time of the pic is about 3". We were merrily racing along when the skipper managed to pile drive her onto a sandbank at full speed (it was a beautiful reach and I got carried away passing some other boats ) . We were racing, so we spent the next hour or two madly trying to haul her off, but she was stuck fast. After taking a break from everyone hanging off the boom and unsuccessfully trying a tow out, we opted for a sundowner to help us plan on round 2, when someone pipes up "Can you hear that gurgling sound?"

I looked over the side of the boat and there lay the bottom under a few inches of water. The fin keel had a draft of 1.6mtr and she'd buried the rudder and keel till the hull was sitting flush on the mudbank. The next pic (which I've lost) shows her high and dry and us playing soccer around the boat. It was so stable we went up the mast to do a service whilst we waited, it felt strange up the mast as the boat didn't move an inch!  

There were a few nervous moments 6 hours later as the tide filled in, but she slid out as clean as floating off a cradle and off we sailed.  

Remember, there are only two types of sailors mate, those that have run aground and those that choose to lie about it. :)

Cheers,

SB

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14 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Will, I dug up a picture for you to try and emulate. But before anyone praises me for keeping her so light and floating on her lines, the depth at the time of the pic is about 3". We were merrily racing along when the skipper managed to pile drive her onto a sandbank at full speed (it was a beautiful reach and I got carried away passing some other boats ) . We were racing, so we spent the next hour or two madly trying to haul her off, but she was stuck fast. After taking a break from everyone hanging off the boom and unsuccessfully trying a tow out, we opted for a sundowner to help us plan on round 2, when someone pipes up "Can you hear that gurgling sound?"

I looked over the side of the boat and there lay the bottom under a few inches of water. The fin keel had a draft of 1.6mtr and she'd buried the rudder and keel till the hull was sitting flush on the mudbank. The next pic (which I've lost) shows her high and dry and us playing soccer around the boat. It was so stable we went up the mast to do a service whilst we waited, it felt strange up the mast as the boat didn't move an inch!  

There were a few nervous moments 6 hours later as the tide filled in, but she slid out as clean as floating off a cradle and off we sailed.  

Remember, there are only two types of sailors mate, those that have run aground and those that choose to lie about it. :)

Cheers,

SB

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I love the redundancy of the anchor in this shot haha

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14 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Will, I dug up a picture for you to try and emulate. But before anyone praises me for keeping her so light and floating on her lines, the depth at the time of the pic is about 3". We were merrily racing along when the skipper managed to pile drive her onto a sandbank at full speed (it was a beautiful reach and I got carried away passing some other boats ) . We were racing, so we spent the next hour or two madly trying to haul her off, but she was stuck fast. After taking a break from everyone hanging off the boom and unsuccessfully trying a tow out, we opted for a sundowner to help us plan on round 2, when someone pipes up "Can you hear that gurgling sound?"

I looked over the side of the boat and there lay the bottom under a few inches of water. The fin keel had a draft of 1.6mtr and she'd buried the rudder and keel till the hull was sitting flush on the mudbank. The next pic (which I've lost) shows her high and dry and us playing soccer around the boat. It was so stable we went up the mast to do a service whilst we waited, it felt strange up the mast as the boat didn't move an inch!  

There were a few nervous moments 6 hours later as the tide filled in, but she slid out as clean as floating off a cradle and off we sailed.  

Remember, there are only two types of sailors mate, those that have run aground and those that choose to lie about it. :)

Cheers,

SB

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Running aground around here is a little noisier, what with the grinding rocks and the screaming crew...luckily I was singlehanded last time, so the crew went without rum once the screaming subsided.

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Great story, Shaggy. Another example of how sailing and schedules frequently don't mix.

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Nice find!

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I got a shore power adaptor to run an electric heater off 110V power. It makes a big difference sleeping aboard. Last night it rained hard, but the boat didn't leak. I checked the bilge and after a week in the water and 2 days of rain it was still bone dry. This boat has a deck stepped mast, and the hardware was all re-bedded by the previous owner. 

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Insulation makes all the difference in January.  Like, lining the v-berth with at least two inches of foam or quilting in every direction. Like, 1978 love nest.  Bow-chicka-bow-wow.  

‘Course, then you need some place to store all that in July.   

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The inside of the boat actually has a lining floating off the hull skin like a double layer tent. It is pretty good on condensation, although the cabin trunk does sweat without the heat on. 

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Will, you probably know this already BUT just in case... be sure to check out the Capri 22 owner's forum and the Facebook group. Both are quite active and members are very keen to assist fellow Capri 22 owners.

Charlie

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3 hours ago, Charlie H said:

Will, you probably know this already BUT just in case... be sure to check out the Capri 22 owner's forum and the Facebook group. Both are quite active and members are very keen to assist fellow Capri 22 owners.

Charlie

That sounds like a good idea. 

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I got a change to go sailing in a bit more wind yesterday (my handheld wind instrument recorded 14-18 across the deck). The sailing performance exceeded my expectations, especially upwind. I expected the boat to tack through about 100 degrees but she actually tacks through a little less than 90. Clearing Fidalgo head for the first time I massively over-stood the channel. Downwind I was also moving well, at 6.5 to 7 knots. Briefly I got the boat up to 8 knots in a gust and she threw off a large wake from the aft quarter. 

 

Today I'm watching the sleet hit the deck, and am waiting for a good break in the weather to go home, shower and head down to Bob's house. 

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He were brung up proper.

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No. That’s a little brisk.  

This is a little cold

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It gets worse.  

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c'mon Will, you haven't had real fun until you've had to wash the boat down first with buckets of salt water to get rid of the snow and ice!

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6 hours ago, toddster said:

It gets worse.  

When the ice load flips the boat, or what?

Ice on a boat should be in a cooler or a blender.

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7 hours ago, Contumacious Tom said:

When the ice load flips the boat, or what?

Ice on a boat should be in a cooler or a blender.

I convinced myself that snow load can’t actually harm the boat - the danger is if ice breaks a drain hose.    “Worse,” is when the hull is frozen in and snow piles up on the ice. It gets hard to find the walkway.  

Actually, I haven’t convinced myself that snow load isn’t a problem when the boat is balanced in its cradle. Probably not.  Getting a bit blizzard-y out there at the moment.  

Edit: Weird, just got email from the marina saying that crews can’t clear snow off the docks today, because they have to prioritize the runway (they’re also in charge of the airport, etc.) Weird because I can’t recall they ever did so in the past...

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I'm not loving the snow although it was a good opportunity to test out the AWD in my car in the parking lot. Right now I have no heat in the boat as my 30A shore power adapter doesn't fit in the 20A plug in the new slip. 

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1 hour ago, willp14335 said:

I'm not loving the snow although it was a good opportunity to test out the AWD in my car in the parking lot. Right now I have no heat in the boat as my 30A shore power adapter doesn't fit in the 20A plug in the new slip. 

You don't have a solar heater? Invaluable up here.

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12 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

They make a dongle for the shore power ours are 20 amp. Snowing heavy up here tonight. Radar around Victoria

Will,

 

Fisheries claims both the fixed adapters and the pigtail ones in stock.  $40-45 for the one piece and about $100 for the pigtail.  Recommend the pigtail. I'd only use the one piece for temp use as it puts quite a cantilever on the plug.   

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Yeah, I'm planning on ordering the pigtail soon. 

 

Today, using the average density of snowfall, the depth of snow and the PPI of my boat I estimated she would be sunk approximately 1". I went down and checked and she is down below the bottom paint in the stern from the extra weight. I think wet PNW snow has a higher density than I used. 

 

I'd like it to melt so I don't have to shovel out the cockpit. 

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6 hours ago, willp14335 said:

Today, using the average density of snowfall, the depth of snow and the PPI of my boat I estimated she would be sunk approximately 1". I went down and checked and she is down below the bottom paint in the stern from the extra weight. I think wet PNW snow has a higher density than I used. 

This is the mentality that led to the Pudgy Polars I love so much.

"Math's great, but I'm gonna go to the water and check."

Someone like that should be designing every boat.

 

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The skiers call it 'Cascade Concrete'.   

Somebody mentioned using salt water to help melt the snow.  Throwing a few buckets on the boat from the dock sounds a lot better than shoveling.   Make sure your cockpit drains are clear. 

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4 hours ago, Kirwan said:

The skiers call it 'Cascade Concrete'.   

Somebody mentioned using salt water to help melt the snow.  Throwing a few buckets on the boat from the dock sounds a lot better than shoveling.   Make sure your cockpit drains are clear. 

That becomes dependent on outside air temp and the actual salinity of the water. Sea water (depending on actual salinity) starts to freeze at around 28 degrees F so if it's 20 degrees outside, the unfrozen seawater will start turning into ice fairly quickly.  

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It's gone back to 40 degrees and raining. I think all the snow will melt off tonight and if not it should definitely be gone by the weekend.

 I just got my registration done, so time to put some new letters on the bow. At the moment I plan to go sailing on Saturday. 

 

 

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Will has been moonlighting for me and doing the #D work on the ADA cat project. He is easy to work with and fast. We had a time limit and a budget on this project and we met both. That is an ability you cannot teach.

46190058185_de89dffccb_h.jpg5 by robert perry, on Flickr

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On 1/31/2019 at 3:24 PM, Ishmael said:

Running aground around here is a little noisier, what with the grinding rocks and the screaming crew...luckily I was singlehanded last time, so the crew went without rum once the screaming subsided.

You left out the panicky adrenaline fueled search of the lazarettes while dipping your fingers in any liquid found therin and wildly sucking on said fingers for the faint hint of SALTY WATER. :o

 

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On 2/11/2019 at 7:36 PM, willp14335 said:

I'm not loving the snow although it was a good opportunity to test out the AWD in my car in the parking lot. Right now I have no heat in the boat as my 30A shore power adapter doesn't fit in the 20A plug in the new slip. 

It’s only money.  Remember this down the road. ^_^  

Boats are, by their nature, expensive.

 

B lew

O nly

A nother 

T housand.

 

And acronyms!

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4 hours ago, Amati said:

It’s only money.  Remember this down the road. ^_^  

Boats are, by their nature, expensive.

 

B lew

O nly

A nother 

T housand.

 

And acronyms!

BTU = Big Toy Unit

With this boat, a BTU is $100, unlike his parents boat...

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6 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

BTU = Big Toy Unit

With this boat, a BTU is $100, unlike his parents boat...

So, BJ or Will-  any design proposals floating around for an in family project?  :rolleyes:

My dad was an architect, so it can come with the territory......

(Napkins can be oh-so-tempting.)

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On 2/13/2019 at 9:31 AM, Kirwan said:

The skiers call it 'Cascade Concrete'.   

Somebody mentioned using salt water to help melt the snow.  Throwing a few buckets on the boat from the dock sounds a lot better than shoveling.   Make sure your cockpit drains are clear. 

And you have to be quick, especially if the snow is over 1’, and the temperature is close to 32 degrees.  One fella lost his bucket in the drink when he had the bow soaked, but the snow + water was still on the deck, and the bow was (how shall say it?) a bit lower to the water, so while bucket was being fished out of the sound, a helpful neighbor who was 6’4” and full of muscle (to coin a phrase ;)) wound up on the bow trying to push the hardened slush off, and that raised the cog enough that things got wobbly, and he grabbed the mast- this was a San Juan 24- and things wound up heeled a bit towards the dock.  The mast and rigging didn’t do any Damage to the Bayliner next door, and Craig didn’t wind up in the water.  

There were some tales of boats in the Seattle area flipping over after a big snow and then a rainy Hawaiian Express in ‘96 (?).  But houses were trying to slide into the Sound too.....

 

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15 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Will has been a bit busy Paul. Didn't you notice?

Yes Bob.  Reverse shear!

And my dad, at any rate, was always more design fecund during a big push.  NTTAWWT.....

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3 hours ago, Amati said:

So, BJ or Will-  any design proposals floating around for an in family project?  :rolleyes:

My dad was an architect, so it can come with the territory......

(Napkins can be oh-so-tempting.)

Even if he designed it, I can't afford to build it!

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I went out and had a great sail today, 18 to 25 knots of wind. At one point I was maintaining 7.5 to 8.5 knots against the current (close to slack tide, ebbing a bit) down the Guemes channel on a broad reach. Videos coming soon. 

So far I've been pretty happy with how this boat sails, she is faster than I expected. 

This weekend I put the new registration number on and installed a new flag pole with a 24" flag. 

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She looks sharp, Will. I'm glad she sails as good as she looks.

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Thanks! 

I still have to put the name on the hull. I am also going to go over some areas with FSR, wax the hull and polish the stainless. I think she will look pretty good after that. 

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And here's the video. I love how she was going fast enough to throw a two foot wake for a lot of the video. I can't wait to get some crew and try out the spinnaker. 

It's easiest to read the GPS screen at 1080p. 

 

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7 hours ago, willp14335 said:

...snip...I still have to put the name on the hull...snip...

What are you going with? Her 8kts probably doesn’t deserve “Spline Weight?” ;)

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13 hours ago, HFC Hunter said:

What are you going with? Her 8kts probably doesn’t deserve “Spline Weight?” ;)

Yah, we're here to help!! Nauti Buoy is universally thought of as kewl. 

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I'm planning to name her Normandie after an old French ocean liner. I have the poster (which I bought in paris) over my work station. 

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5 minutes ago, willp14335 said:

I'm planning to name her Normandie after an old French ocean liner. I have the poster (which I bought in paris) over my work station. 

43346202_2145994082160203_517311699653492736_n.jpg

Nice hat!

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“There's 106(or more!) miles to Chicago, we've got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark out, and we're wearing sunglasses.”

Normandie is already twice the age her namesake achieved. Mileage is probably lower though.

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1 hour ago, willp14335 said:

I'm planning to name her Normandie after an old French ocean liner. I have the poster (which I bought in paris) over my work station. 

43346202_2145994082160203_517311699653492736_n.jpg

Aw geeze Will, I dunno......

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I prefer to think of her when she was under ownership of the French rather than seized by the American government, set on fire and capsized... 

l9hqnxu3tme01.jpg

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3 minutes ago, willp14335 said:

I prefer to think of her when she was under ownership of the French rather than seized by the American government, set on fire and capsized... 

l9hqnxu3tme01.jpg

It looks like the restaurant is being run with classic French efficiency. "Do you 'ave a reservation, monsieur? No? So sad."

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5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It looks like the restaurant is being run with classic French efficiency. "Do you 'ave a reservation, monsieur? No? So sad."

We took a ferry from Portsmouth, UK to Caen France last summer while we were over there for Will's graduation. The return trip was on the Eurostar train.

The Ferry was run by the French, the train by the English. I'll let you guess which one had really good food, and which one had barely warm...stuff...and little enough of that.

Hint: The Tarte au Citron on the ferry was as good as any we had during the next two weeks.

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