2Newts

Large center-cockpit cruiser sinks in CT River

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This is nuts. Boat looks like it was left on a sunny afternoon ready to go out the next day. Well, almost. Roller-furling main is still in; jib was removed. But the dodger is still up. Everything basically ready to go and looks to be in good condition. And then comes the ice and sinks the thing. 

 

 

 

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It's really a shame. Hamburg Cove is beautiful in the summer, but it's 8 miles up the CT river and the water is brackish at best and freezes well before other places farther south. Given the amount of ice around it before it went down, maybe the owner couldn't get back out to it and was hoping for a thaw and ran out of time.

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We usually have a low budget bunch in Weems Creek that let their boats get iced in every winter. They mostly don't sink and the ones that have sunk seemed to be from snow and ice loading causing flooding, not ice making a hole in the boat.

Insurance job??????????????

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It does look like a Little Harbor. What do you think, about 50'?

I'm trying to work out the mechanics of how the ice, which has not been terribly thick, sinks a boat like that. I suppose it could have ripped off the rudder, or maybe bent the propeller shaft and opened up the stuffing box. I find it unlikely there was enough ice to put the boat on it's side and have the water come in from the topsides. 

 

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I would suspect that water froze in a hose & tore the hose open. Or blew a thru hull off. Nowhere near enuff ice to damage the hull

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I'm with longy on this one.  Not nearly enough ice to damage the hull.  If the thru hulls were left open and a hose burst, then maybe...though that shouldn't have sunk it till it got warm?

 

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ice in one of those perko raw water strainers with the clear lens would pop fairly easy and its amazing how much water comes in a pencil size hole in a day or two.

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It does look like a Little Harbor. What do you think, about 50'?

I'm trying to work out the mechanics of how the ice, which has not been terribly thick, sinks a boat like that. I suppose it could have ripped off the rudder, or maybe bent the propeller shaft and opened up the stuffing box. I find it unlikely there was enough ice to put the boat on it's side and have the water come in from the topsides. 

 

It is a Little Harbor 54.  Don't know why he left it in brackish water.  We've had a ton of rain in the last week or two as well as temperatures in the signal digits for the day.  More then likely the scuppers froze as well as the ice pulling him in.  All you have to do is get those scuppers underwater and you are done.  I checked my boat on the hard yesterday.  It was in the forties , but the bilge was filled with rain water which froze up nicely

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It is not a LH54. It *was* a LH 53, which was then extended in the transom to be a one-off LH55. Very nice boat and owners - not neglected at all. In fact when I was on board a few months ago, they had just stripped and redone all the varnish, painted some of the interior, plus an array of other upgrades. Plans were to haul in CT for the Winter to continue the project. I haven't been back in touch so I have no clue why they left her in so long, and on a mooring none the less. She was a gorgeous boat in good shape (and a model that you can't build or buy anymore!!), so this is very sad to see.

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38 minutes ago, LotsO'Knots said:

Very nice boat and owners - not neglected at all. In fact when I was on board a few months ago, they had just stripped and redone all the varnish, painted some of the interior, plus an array of other upgrades.

Maintenance like that is just the sunk cost of owning that boat.

Sad to see this happen, but it's January in CT, so it seems like an inevitable outcome.

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1 hour ago, Crash said:

I'm with longy on this one.  Not nearly enough ice to damage the hull.  If the thru hulls were left open and a hose burst, then maybe...though that shouldn't have sunk it till it got warm?

 

I've been caught in a flash freeze  like this in freshwater. It's not the ice around the hull that is the issue at this point, rather it's the water that splashes up into the thru hull and hose. The splashed water seems to freeze much faster than the surface  as it is exposed to air temperature. A thin wall of ice can turn into a block in no time.

I spent a few nervous hours with a hair dryer unfucking up the situation.

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I would be heartbroken. I wonder if that kind of thing is even covered under a standard insurance policy?

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Depends I guess on the policy. Mine states that if the boat is left in the water in freezing conditions with out a bubble/ice eater, any damage to the boat caused by ice is not covered.  

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I know the owners, the wife confirmed it to a mutual friend, and I am gobsmacked!!  Retired couple on a fixed income, as in fixed pretty good!  They loved the boat and have a house nearby in Hadlyme and one in Florida.  They are probbly mid-60's, so not elderly as some have suggested on Cruisers Forum.  Boat was at a dock at Essex Island Marina recently and I just can't beleive they left it their with the sails still on?  It's certainly not an insurance gambit, I'm pretty sure, knowing them fairly well.  They commissioned an artist friend to do a painting of this boat, and I was looking forward to sailing with them one day......  Hamburg Cove is fresh water, so I suspect a thru-hull or hose froze and cracked, and it got warm enough yesterday to thaw out.  A year or so before I joined Boomerang as Mate, then BN, they brought the boat to this cove to do the IOR measurement in fresh water, which was totally legal at the time. Had to heel the boat over with Spin Halyards at the I-95 bridge, over the CT River to get 93 foot mast underneath it. 

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11 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

It's certainly not an insurance gambit, I'm pretty sure, knowing them fairly well. 

What strikes me is the "before" aerial video, it's just too much like ISIS filming a truck they know is going to blow up.

NOT saying that is the case here but ...... why the "before" video?

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10 minutes ago, Parma said:

What strikes me is the "before" aerial video, it's just too much like ISIS filming a truck they know is going to blow up.

NOT saying that is the case here but ...... why the "before" video?

I suspect the "before" video was just a chance to exercise the drone. I mean, how often can you fly a drone through the rigging?

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99.9999% of us......never.

Like the sinking, it's just not typical

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49 minutes ago, Parma said:

What strikes me is the "before" aerial video, it's just too much like ISIS filming a truck they know is going to blow up.

NOT saying that is the case here but ...... why the "before" video?

 

It's possible, even  likely, that the two different videos are from different days, then spliced together.  I did comment to Missus BB and other mutual friends a while ago, how surprised I was that the sails were left on.  When it was at Essex Island Marina, I believe the cockpit cushions were left out 24/7.

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More rumors floating around.  Missus BB's Chiropractor, who she just saw, lives up there and she and her husband own 2 moorings in the cove.  Supposedly the drone footage was taken at different times.  On the same day it sunk, one person drowned and another was rescued from the ice at Rogers Lake about 5 or 6 miles away.  Initial reports were sketchy, so some rescue folks looked for them in the cove and found the boat sunk.  Mutual friends have texted the owner, but no reply yet.  Also, supposedly some locals went out to suss out the situation, and the owner "supposedly" showed up and was pissed off, so they left.  I take these reports with a grain of salt, like any gossip.  I just made myself chuckle right there!  Soverel 27 we race on is called "Rumor", and the owners trawler they are restoring, is "Gossip"!! 

Former SA'er Regatta Dog, one of my best mates, who races with me, just texted that there is a story on Scuttlebutt, saying that salvage was attempted today but the pumps could not keep up, and she sank again.  RD was banned by Scot, for calling him a rude name, so his URL is banned from posting, but he is able to lurk and read threads...

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8 hours ago, LotsO'Knots said:

It is not a LH54. It *was* a LH 53, which was then extended in the transom to be a one-off LH55. Very nice boat and owners - not neglected at all. In fact when I was on board a few months ago, they had just stripped and redone all the varnish, painted some of the interior, plus an array of other upgrades. Plans were to haul in CT for the Winter to continue the project. I haven't been back in touch so I have no clue why they left her in so long, and on a mooring none the less. She was a gorgeous boat in good shape (and a model that you can't build or buy anymore!!), so this is very sad to see.

 

This is correct, based on my conversations with the owner, who was keen to have me and Missus BB along for crew, as he usually runs the boat himself, since his wife is real newbie, with no boating experience prior to their getting together and then marrying.  Hope they get her fixed, as I would be keen to help deliver the boat back and forth from CT to FL, in a couple years when I will be able to retire, if I so choose

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Just now, billy backstay said:

 

This is correct, based on my conversations with the owner, who was keen to have me and Missus BB along for crew, as he usually runs the boat himself, since his wife is real newbie, with no boating experience prior to their getting together and then marrying.  Hope they get her fixed, as I would be keen to help deliver the boat back and forth from CT to FL, in a couple years when I will be able to retire, if I so choose

There's going to be a lot of fixing to do, and even more if it stays there for a while. If indeed the insurance policy does not cover events like this then said fixing will be out-of-pocket. So too the salvage bill. 

There's also a deep freeze coming. Supposed to go down near zero on Wednesday. That'll complicate any recovery operation. 

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40 minutes ago, 2Newts said:

There's going to be a lot of fixing to do, and even more if it stays there for a while. If indeed the insurance policy does not cover events like this then said fixing will be out-of-pocket. So too the salvage bill. 

There's also a deep freeze coming. Supposed to go down near zero on Wednesday. That'll complicate any recovery operation. 

 

All true! I believe they have the resources, to take care of this, but I am still shocked that this happened in the first place.  Perhaps there are extenuating circumstances that we are unaware of and, I'm giving them the benefit of the doubt, until someone hears back from the.  I will hope that is the case, so fingers crossed! I am sending a text message now to offer any assistance that I can provide...

Forecast for Chicago and environs is down , to 50 below with wind chill, on Wednesday, and maybe Thursday, and we usually get their weather 24 hours later, although it is somewhat ameliorated, by the nearby waters of the relatively much warmer Long Island Sound and CT River.

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Some boats like my Viking 33, have the cockpit drains at the forward end. The thru hull fittings must be left open so the rain and or snow can drain. This is a stupid design IMO. I shut both thru hull taps, and the cockpit drains out the aft end, and exit above the water line. About one inch of water remains in the forward part of the cockpit. I may make further mods to the angle of the sole / floor sometime. I have no idea how the system works in the boat that sank.

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1 hour ago, Unkle Crusty said:

Some boats like my Viking 33, have the cockpit drains at the forward end. The thru hull fittings must be left open so the rain and or snow can drain. This is a stupid design IMO. I shut both thru hull taps, and the cockpit drains out the aft end, and exit above the water line. About one inch of water remains in the forward part of the cockpit. I may make further mods to the angle of the sole / floor sometime. I have no idea how the system works in the boat that sank.

Apparently it didn't.

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I find it difficult to believe that it was sunk by ice or cold weather. There's maybe 2cm of ice. You can sail in that. It hasn't been really cold either because there's so little ice. The water warms the boat until the ice gets much thicker. Last winter I had a boat in 20 cm of ice through through the winter and nothing happened. The ice seems untouched, though. Mmaybe there's a strong current which weakens the ice and it has been -20C after all.

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I don't sail much in winter here because I have to wear a hoodie. This is a good reminder that you guys have it pretty rough with weather. 

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29 minutes ago, Alcatraz5768 said:

I don't sail much in winter here because I have to wear a hoodie. This is a good reminder that you guys have it pretty rough with weather. 

 

Frostbite One Design is March through May, and October through December!  JY's, Lasers, Ideal 18's, MC Scows and Etchells.

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gosh what a shame....I worry about my boat sitting on the hard in winter...

I can't imagine how they could let this happen, other than some crisis in their lives that makes the boat expendable, like a terminal health crisis, or total financial disaster...or a completely destroyed marriage, jilted lover that works at the yard, drug soaked immigrant criminals that worked at the yard, mental breakdown of the yard manager, a Mueller indictment, getting booted from SA....wait...I guess I can imagine quite a bit....

Did I miss anything?

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On 1/28/2019 at 8:47 AM, Plausible said:

follow the money ..........

+1...cynical I know...but why not?

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31 minutes ago, EvaOdland said:

a Mueller indictment

That's the best one. Hey @billy backstay, does the boat belong to Roger Stone?!?

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46 minutes ago, 2Newts said:

That's the best one. Hey @billy backstay, does the boat belong to Roger Stone?!?

No, not him!LOL

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Very sad!  Hamburg Cove and Selden Creek old stomping grounds decades ago.

Impossible to believe this wonderful yacht was left there deliberately.  Who knows what happened!  Was spotted earlier at Essex Island Marina.  Maybe went up to HC on a warm, sunny winter day, picked up mooring, then engine wouldn't start. Occupants had to bail out using dinghy.  Overnight freeze made it impossible for anyone to get back on board cos ice too thin to bear weight but thick enough to imprison her.  Take your pick of theories on why, from there, she sank.

She can be reflected and salvaged. Some hard-core watermen who routinely work on the river year-around can effect a rescue. Approaching cold snap will delay proceedings.

 

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The guy who took the video said the fire department and owner were on site before it went down. The owner had a chance to save it as it was slowly sinking, but apparently had more pressing matters than keeping his $500k boat afloat. 

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23 minutes ago, ss123 said:

The guy who took the video said the fire department and owner were on site before it went down. The owner had a chance to save it as it was slowly sinking, but apparently had more pressing matters than keeping his $500k boat afloat. 

 

They will buy another boat.  First world problem!!  Even if someone gave me a boat like, that I doubt I could afford to insure, maintain and mooring or dockage fees!!!

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19 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

They will buy another boat.  First world problem!!  Even if someone gave me a boat like, that I doubt I could afford to insure, maintain and mooring or dockage fees!!!

You nevere no.  Ask the ownere to gifte it you, you restorre to formere glorey, then youre rente bille dissapeeres.  Thiges maye worke oute.

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2 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

You nevere no.  Ask the ownere to gifte it you, you restorre to formere glorey, then youre rente bille dissapeeres.  Thiges maye worke oute.

 

No thanks, Snags!  One thing the last recession taught me, is the more stuff you own, the more it owns you, having to maintain, insure and store things....  

OPB's, Other Peoples Boats, that's more my style now!  At one point, we owned a half dozen small boats and many of our friends used our dock for theirs...

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That boat will be on Cooper Capital Salvage in May...sad

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1 minute ago, Sail4beer said:

That boat will be on Cooper Capital Salvage in May...sad

 

Like Snaggy said, it will be an opportunity for someone who otherwise could not afford to own a beautiful boat like that.  But, when you own less stuff, it's easier to lock up the apartment or house and travel for a few weeks.

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I don’t have that simple a life myself.

I did before I met my wife and found out I had some spare money to buy a boat or two...or more...

 

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2 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I don’t have that simple a life myself.

I did before I met my wife and found out I had some spare money to buy a boat or two...or more...

 

 

I'd rather spend the money to go for a week or so, to Europe, and sail on other peoples boats. OTOH, if I had the spare dosh to own a boat like that, I certainly would!!

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34 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

That boat will be on Cooper Capital Salvage in May...sad

The owner of Cooper Capital Slavage has a home on the cove, probably watched it go down from his kitchen. 

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Good ol’ Ronnie! 

He used to live down here and was an attorney. Pretty smart guy

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14 hours ago, KiwiJoker said:

Very sad!  Hamburg Cove and Selden Creek old stomping grounds decades ago.

Impossible to believe this wonderful yacht was left there deliberately.  Who knows what happened!  Was spotted earlier at Essex Island Marina.  Maybe went up to HC on a warm, sunny winter day, picked up mooring, then engine wouldn't start. Occupants had to bail out using dinghy.  Overnight freeze made it impossible for anyone to get back on board cos ice too thin to bear weight but thick enough to imprison her.  Take your pick of theories on why, from there, she sank.

She can be reflected and salvaged. Some hard-core watermen who routinely work on the river year-around can effect a rescue. Approaching cold snap will delay proceedings.

 

The boat has been there for quite a while.  Don't remember exactly when it showed up, but I don't recall seeing it moved through the whole foliage season.  Until very recently, I was living on the Cove and I'm usually one of the last to pull my boat out of the water (around Thanksgiving).  That was one of maybe 2 or 3 still out there on my trip down river.

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I was up at Essex Marina last month looking at a boat. Had to cross the winter bridge to the other side. It looked like everyone had hauled there or next door for the season.

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16 hours ago, Snow Guy said:

The boat has been there for quite a while.  Don't remember exactly when it showed up, but I don't recall seeing it moved through the whole foliage season.  Until very recently, I was living on the Cove and I'm usually one of the last to pull my boat out of the water (around Thanksgiving).  That was one of maybe 2 or 3 still out there on my trip down river.

Thanks. This story has shifted from bad luck to sheer negligence.  You can leave a well-built boat to freeze in ....... if if it is well prepared. But to avoid crushing damage from a broad expanse of ice you need to be in a mud berth or small protected body of water, ie, a piled marina berth. This guy did neither and then somehow or other it looks as if he failed to take advantage of Fire Department help. 

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Maybe the owner passed away, and everyone forgot about the boat.

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Just out of curiosity, if the fire deparment was on site while the boat was sinking slowly, do you need to have the permission of the owner to rescue the boat? Or do you need to have the owner by your side for that matter?  Isn't it the duty of the fire department to intervene anyhow? If this was not a case of a boat sinking, but a house on fire where the owners were not there or not aware, would it be any different? 

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41 minutes ago, Omer said:

Just out of curiosity, if the fire deparment was on site while the boat was sinking slowly, do you need to have the permission of the owner to rescue the boat? Or do you need to have the owner by your side for that matter?  Isn't it the duty of the fire department to intervene anyhow? If this was not a case of a boat sinking, but a house on fire where the owners were not there or not aware, would it be any different? 

The fire department's primary business is putting out fires and saving lives, not salvaging boats.  This situation was certainly is not in the area of their expertise.  There was no emergency, no humans were on the boat, there was no danger to anything but the sinking boat.  Why would the FD have an obligation to intervene in a situation like that?

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Environmental damage from fuel, motor oil, transmission fluid, antifreeze, sewage or hazardous materials like paint or solvents etc stored onboard?

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May be there was no danger to anyone at the time of sinking. But come summer, there will be a lot of potential danger to a lot of people boating around the area.

To  me it is common sense to prevent something bad happening than undertaking a difficult and costly salvage operation. 

She was close to shore and where she sank doesnt seem deep. Woldnt it be  possible to tow her to a shallower place, beach her there  to prevent her going under completely

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It’s pretty hard to tow a boat that has sunk into the muddy bottom.

It wouldn’t be that difficult to raise the boat with a few large garbage pumps and a tow boat to pull the boat out of the vacuum caused by the keel in the mud as you pump. Plastic sheeting around the cockpit and companionway keeps the water from getting back inas you pump. It takes a while,  but they always pop back to the surface.

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This reminds me of a half-sunk Morgan OI at my marina. We broke the lock and got to pumping and I dove under the boat and plugged all the thru-hulls. The owner showed up the next day and was pissed that people messed with his boat. Probably had the claim already filed :rolleyes:

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I did the same once and the owner asked me why I didn’t pickle the engine to save it after it had been submerged for a week. 

I felt like filing a salvage claim to f with him...

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This boat will sail again. It HAS sails, after-all. Might have to hang an outboard out back and have attached battery-lights to sail in the evening, but to someone this is still a very viable boat. Unless maybe there is a HUGE hole in the hull. As for: "Environmental damage from fuel, motor oil, transmission fluid, antifreeze, sewage or hazardous materials like paint or solvents etc stored onboard?" This will be assessed by CT state environmental concerns and the owner will be fined. My ( much smaller/simpler) boat sunk up to the boom, like this a few years ago but with no electronics, no engine, no cushions or wood it was just a tad wetter than on a normal big wind day. Everything was back to normal in a few hours.

Possibly someone shot it, duck hunters!

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8 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Maybe the owner passed away, and everyone forgot about the boat.

This was my first thought too... 

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On 1/30/2019 at 10:17 AM, ss123 said:

The owner of Cooper Capital Slavage has a home on the cove, probably watched it go down from his kitchen. 

 

while he was putting away his icepick after trying to drum up some new business?

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56 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

W T F

Sunk on purpose ............................... :wacko:

If it's worth a dollar but there's 2 dollars owed on it ...yeah, sunk on purpose.

it will be interesting to find out if the fuel tank was empty and if he had pumped the engine oil out as well prior to abandonment.

The "no insurance" aspect of it certainly looms large.

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Makes no sense to let a boat sink that is uninsured...especially if there are fluids aboard.

However, if, as Parma says, there are no fluids aboard....

I love Little Harbors.  Damned shame.

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Doesn't take much to bring something down this time of year.  Chances are the sight glass on the water intake strainer cracked from cold air travelling up the hose.  Once that cracks, the siphon starts-and the only thing stopping it is what charge is left in the battery.  Once the battery dies, there is nothing to stop the slow, inevitable crawl to the bottom.

Understood the FD and the owner were on board the day before it sank.  Crazy nothing was done, and none of us yards on the river were contacted to help.

No insurance claim here.  No company in the world will write any policy for the CT River during January after what we had last year.  If you can get something, it is for being in a slip only, and you must have bubblers.

It's not in any channel, so that muddies the salvage picture.

We heard they tried a lift early this week, but the pumps could not keep up.  50,000 lbs displacement before you add all that water weight-that's a good-sized lift in icy, shallow waters.  Suction has to be intense with the amount of water movement we have had this fall and winter.  Had to be 5+ knots of current on Monday.

It all adds up to one ugly situation!  The water is brackish there, so salt water intrusion is on that ugly list.

 

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3 hours ago, 2Newts said:

Update here

 

 

Guy who took the video says the boat was at Essex YC prior to moving to Hamburg Cove.  Not true, the owners are not members, it was at Essex Island Marina. I find it hard to believe the owners refused to have a pump put in, at the Fire Dept's recommendation, but I will find out if that's true or not..

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26 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Guy who took the video says the boat was at Essex YC prior to moving to Hamburg Cove.  Not true, the owners are not members, it was at Essex Island Marina. I find it hard to believe the owners refused to have a pump put in, at the Fire Dept's recommendation, but I will find out if that's true or not..

The word neglect cannot be argued.  I assume there are any number of marinas where the owner could have pulled up, swiped his credit card, handed over the keys and said, take care of it.  For what?  Less than 5K?  If he was that tight on funds he owned the wrong boat.  A beautiful boat like that did/does not deserve a moron as an owner.  Just a few items on my list says that it is going to be well north of 100K and probably much closer to 200 to get it back on the water in any shape that resembles the before state.  Still shaking my head.  

Boat is documented to a Seahawk Enterprises, Inc. out of, of course, Delaware.  

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1 hour ago, Cal20sailor said:

The word neglect cannot be argued.  I assume there are any number of marinas where the owner could have pulled up, swiped his credit card, handed over the keys and said, take care of it.  For what?  Less than 5K?  If he was that tight on funds he owned the wrong boat.  A beautiful boat like that did/does not deserve a moron as an owner.  Just a few items on my list says that it is going to be well north of 100K and probably much closer to 200 to get it back on the water in any shape that resembles the before state.  Still shaking my head.  

Boat is documented to a Seahawk Enterprises, Inc. out of, of course, Delaware.  

 

I am not arguing with that, but I have known the owner casually for many years, his fairly recent wife, just fairly recently.  Something doesn't add up, and I will attempt to find out what that is. Money is not a problem for these people, unless something is really amiss, that is not obvious on the face of it. 

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2 hours ago, billy backstay said:
3 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

The word neglect cannot be argued.  I assume there are any number of marinas where the owner could have pulled up, swiped his credit card, handed over the keys and said, take care of it.  For what?  Less than 5K?  If he was that tight on funds he owned the wrong boat.  A beautiful boat like that did/does not deserve a moron as an owner.  Just a few items on my list says that it is going to be well north of 100K and probably much closer to 200 to get it back on the water in any shape that resembles the before state.  Still shaking my head.  

Boat is documented to a Seahawk Enterprises, Inc. out of, of course, Delaware.  

I am not arguing with that, but I have known the owner casually for many years, his fairly recent wife, just fairly recently.  Something doesn't add up, and I will attempt to find out what that is. Money is not a problem for these people, unless something is really amiss, that is not obvious on the face of it. 

So whats to argue?  If thay dointe caire, why shoude you?

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3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

I am not arguing with that, but I have known the owner casually for many years, his fairly recent wife, just fairly recently.  Something doesn't add up, and I will attempt to find out what that is. Money is not a problem for these people, unless something is really amiss, that is not obvious on the face of it. 

In no way am I implying any of my next thought is true in any way, but based on my own recent family issues, I almost wonder if some form of rapid onset dementia could be at play. It could explain pretty much every irrational decision regarding that boat. I’ve seen similar actions first hand. 

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6 hours ago, Shipwrittech said:

Had to be 5+ knots of current on Monday.

It's in Hamburg Cove, not the main river, so only modest tidal movement. 

 

5 hours ago, billy backstay said:

Guy who took the video says the boat was at Essex YC prior to moving to Hamburg Cove.  Not true, the owners are not members, it was at Essex Island Marina.

guy who took the video also admits quite clearly to not being a boat person, so easy to confuse Essex YC with Essex Island Marina. 

 

6 hours ago, Shipwrittech said:

Suction has to be intense

That's what I'm thinking. The longer it stays in that muck, the more difficult and expensive it will be to get it out. As soon as the cost of retrieval is more than the salvage company can get for it at auction, who pays? The state, I suppose. They have to be eager to get that fuel tank and other contaminants out of the cove. I think you can see a small oil slick in the still images of the later video. 

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They’ll have to inject water under the keel with a pump to break the hydraulic bond between the hull and muck. 

 

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29 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

They’ll have to inject water under the keel with a pump to break the hydraulic bond between the hull and muck. 

I'm slow, why do you call it a hydraulic bond?  I stick my foot deep in mud, sure, it takes an effort to get it out.  But isn't that just friction and the desire of the mud to keep filling each void?  Not challenging, just unfamiliar with the term hydraulic bond.  

Edit: for my foot, it's the weight of the mud on top of it.  Nothing hydraulic.  For a boat, unless there is a hollow in the keel, is this really that big of deal. 

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Ever walk in water/soft mud and get your boot stuck to the point it's going to come off?  If you rock your foot side to side it will come out - I have saved several guys from real embarrassment by pointing that out. It takes a lot more effort to pull it straight up. Rocking the boat would serve the same purpose but not that easy to do on such a large vessel. 

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11 hours ago, 2Newts said:

Update here

 

Thanks for posting this!

Obviously I know none of the facts, but the fellow in the video has no obvious reason to lie and overall comes across as fairly credible.

Leaving the boat unattended on a mooring as winter approached was stupid but plausible: I know several people who for (what I regard as inadequate) personal reasons have similarly neglected expensive boats very much like the one we're discussing. But refusing to put a pump aboard after it became clear that the boat was in the process of sinking is just off-the-charts crazy. Monkey's suggestion (post #75) may be accurate.    

 

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If they're as rich as Billy says, someone come up with a plausible explanation.  I cannot.  Hire a guy, it's winter any number of pro crew in the area, hand them a credit card and pay them 500/wk and you're good to go.  They have the job for two weeks.  The owner is an ass as the boat should have been out of the water NLT 1 November.  I don't care (albeit sympathetic) if life's issues took over.  How long does it take to call a marina and tell them to go down, retrieve the boat, haul, and bill me. That's about 5-10mins if the credit card clears.  Neglect for what reason.  I'm thinking he had a piece on the side and the relatively new wife was divorcing him.  

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7 hours ago, 2Newts said:

It's in Hamburg Cove, not the main river, so only modest tidal movement. 

 

guy who took the video also admits quite clearly to not being a boat person, so easy to confuse Essex YC with Essex Island Marina. 

 

That's what I'm thinking. The longer it stays in that muck, the more difficult and expensive it will be to get it out. As soon as the cost of retrieval is more than the salvage company can get for it at auction, who pays? The state, I suppose. They have to be eager to get that fuel tank and other contaminants out of the cove. I think you can see a small oil slick in the still images of the later video. 

Interesting situation. It ain't going anywhere, or any deeper.  As long as ice on the pond, no wave action to complicate things.

From everything noted here, sinking was slow and probably due to cracked through-hulls or split hoses or similar. Hull likely intact.  Close off deck and cockpit openings, get a big pump running and she'll pop right up. More than enough buoyancy in that empty hull to lift her out of the mud. If needed, air bags at low tide will provide extra lift.

After that it's a big, tedious, cleanup job, simplified cos its basically fresh water. Mast and mainsail are pristine. Clean, flush and get engine running. Wash and clean all other sails.  New batteries, all electrics and electronics, soft furnishings, etc.

No insurance for sure and not cheap.  But owner has to get his shit together.

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Kiwi, It's genes. Some dodgers are lucky, but incapable of "getting anything together," as should be obvious! 

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What about the hull and deck core after sinking?  If it's cored, isn't there a risk of the core being saturated?  Forever?  We sink a lot of boats down here in Florida during hurricane season, and core saturation is always bandied about, but I don'r really know if it's a real issue. Anyone?

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54 minutes ago, mookiesurfs said:

What about the hull and deck core after sinking?  If it's cored, isn't there a risk of the core being saturated?  Forever?  We sink a lot of boats down here in Florida during hurricane season, and core saturation is always bandied about, but I don'r really know if it's a real issue. Anyone?

No - the hull and deck should be waterproof. Core damage happens to hurricane wrecks because the hull and deck are damaged, allowing water to get into the core.

I have dealt with sunken  boats and two things are a big deal. Thing one is if the shore power is on and/or the batteries are on, electrical damage can be immense. Thing two is engine oil and diesel gets places you would never think of and can't access and comes back out a long time later.

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Should be...follow the money...

Avoidable mess!

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Introducing water from the non weather side  seems like it would be a problem.  In a perfect world holes would be potted but back to reality.

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