Antoine31

Why the Rustler 36?

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I see that the winner of the recent Golden Globe race was sailing a Rustler 36. The second and third place finishers also sailed a Rustler 36, as did some others. My questions:  Why this boat?  What makes it good for a race like this?  Are these the qualities that make for a good cruising boat?

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The Golden Globe restricted the types of boats that could enter.  The Rustler (and an assortment of other dated designs) fell within the parameters.  Rustlers were apparently built well enough to last in sufficient quantities to be available for people to acquire in order to race. Other designs that might have met the parameters may not have been built as well, so fell apart before people could buy them to enter into this race.   If you read the assorted (and there are many) different threads about this race, you will see that it is not necessarily the best boat for a round the world race.  If the race organizer stipulates that only boats of a specific color can enter the race, and then the winner is that color, what does it tell you about the value of the boat's color in winning? Not much. 

   Rustler 36's have a reputation for being relatively well-built, seaworthy boats.  If a large number of them are entered into a race, chances are that a large number of them will do well. 

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The Rustler was designed by Holman and Pye.

The firm designed boats that were meant to sail offshore. Their designs sailed very well and cabin layouts etc were done for living offshore.

Holman and Pye deigned the original Oysters, the Centurians and Bowmans. All strong and fast boats. And good looking too.

 

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3 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

My questions:  Why this boat?  What makes it good for a race like this?  Are these the qualities that make for a good cruising boat?

You will find the answer in two GGR  threads which have been going for a few years now. The most recent covering the race period since last June.

 

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5 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

What makes it good for a race like this?

It's a heavy-displacement yacht with a full keel and transom-hung, tiller-steered rudder. It's pretty solid ('overbuilt'), and has a relatively small cabin. 

5 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

Are these the qualities that make for a good cruising boat?

I like all of those features, but different people have different opinions about what makes "a good cruising boat". Many consider the Rustler as 'old-fashioned', as well as expensive.

All yachts are compromises, and the question is rather subjective. Happily, the Rustler brand provides an alternative to those dissatisfied with Beneteau/Bavaria type yachts.

Rustlers are certainly well-constructed yachts with an excellent reputation. The Princess Royal had a 36 for a long time, Blue Doublet. Her current boat is another Rustler (44 footer), this one named Ballochbuie. See further here.

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10 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

  Are these the qualities that make for a good cruising boat?

If you are interested in cruising quite slowly around the world by yourself without stopping, I think the answer is unequivocally, "Yes".

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It's like a car race limited to 1920 Bentleys . Silly but still charming in a historic way. I think if pressed to do a race like that I'd choose an old Swan 44 or even a Valiant 40 but neither would be allowed.

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They are fat, heavy, overbuilt slugs that cannot get out of their own way and defy everything that anyone has learned in the last 50 years of design and construction. Were it not for the inane perversity of the pathetic global procession that is the GGR, they'd all be owned by dreamers who'd never left the dock.

There's nothing to see here ... let's get back to sailing.

 

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1 hour ago, Moonduster said:

They are fat, heavy, overbuilt slugs that cannot get out of their own way and defy everything that anyone has learned in the last 50 years of design and construction. Were it not for the inane perversity of the pathetic global procession that is the GGR, they'd all be owned by dreamers who'd never left the dock.

There's nothing to see here ... let's get back to sailing.

 

hyperbole apart, grin, one reason why some would hardly ever leave the dock would be that going backward with a Rustler 36 was always an adventure ... loooong time ago (Al Gore had just invented the interwebs) a Rustler 36 owner moaned on one of the first  yottie forums about the fact that he could not get his Rustler out of the box without dropping some anchor chain and pivoting on it, using the rudder to make a turn backwards was just not on. One guy answered he coud do that, others doubted ... so a challenge came up, with some 6 or 7 odd people we gathered one day where the Rustler was located and whoever wanted to try could make an attempt ... non succeeded and the overall agreement was that using the anchor chain was the only viable option not having a bowthruster.

Not a total slug though, certainly not in heavier weather where the longkeelers come to their own, for an amateur worldgirdler it's not unlogical to prefer a heavy seaworthy and trustworthy yacht. Getting it through the doldrums might be the biggest challenge though ;)

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Yeah, I bet Luis Hamilton laughs at classic car racing too...

And you fuckwads are just too cool to sail slow boats. So get off your asses and get back  to sailing your V70s, IMOCA 65s, or AC water bugs.

 

Oh wait. You sail 6 kn shit boxes like the rest of us. 

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Rub it in beer!

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I don’t even sail it and it’s still a weapon!

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Sure is a sleek looking boat. But I have to say I like the more "traditional" boats that you own. And heck, there's no wood on that boat. What would you have to work on?

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Ok!

 

F3CF9743-F6A0-4D55-A7FD-294745F55021.jpeg

Well I know I definitely don't want to take this down into the Southern Ocean.

In fact I would not want to take it out of sight of land.

AND I would want a rescue boat at all times even in Biscayne bay.

 

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I never heard of a Fareast28R going down. Biscayne Bay, FL -no problem. Bay of Biscaye- no way!

And Woahboy, it takes all my free time just maintaining the plywood outboard bracket! 

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15 hours ago, Moonduster said:

They are fat, heavy, overbuilt slugs that cannot get out of their own way and defy everything that anyone has learned in the last 50 years of design and construction. Were it not for the inane perversity of the pathetic global procession that is the GGR, they'd all be owned by dreamers who'd never left the dock.

There's nothing to see here ... let's get back to sailing.

 

Moon you made me larf with that piece of pure bullshit.

Crikey man you bang on endlessly like a grumpy old man that had his dick surgically removed because it was irretrievably jammed in your gob.

Sailed Rustlers and yup they have design idiosyncrasies like all yachts have.

Mast is a tad out of place and results in helm loading.

Forefoot cutaway is pretty deep and transom hung rudder makes for little predictable reverse manoeuvres.

How ever the large commodious cockpit is a joy along with ample storage.

The tankage and internal storage capacity made them the got to yacht of choice for this idiot event.

Built by the proverbial brick shithouse and found in anchorages worldwide.

Few 12m yachts relish being given a severe rodgering from a hectic multi direction massive southern ocean tempest.

Sorry what exactly is your ride.

 

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52 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Few 12m yachts relish being given a severe rodgering from a hectic multi direction massive southern ocean tempest.

Well that is where you are wrong. If it wasn't for the long keel fetish of the GGR RO, there are other production boats of similar vintage and size far better suited to the SO than the Rustlers and with a history on their side. You probably know that but temporarily forgot.

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1 hour ago, Priscilla said:

Sorry what exactly is your ride.

I believe it's on the beach in Tonga.  Not so good at hurricane prep, but an expert on the internet.  

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45 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Well that is where you are wrong. If it wasn't for the long keel fetish of the GGR RO, there are other production boats of similar vintage and size far better suited to the SO than the Rustlers and with a history on their side. You probably know that but temporarily forgot.

Sorry Tinny Hat Light Bulb Guy but remind me what’s your ride.

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39 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Pics please.

I will help you a little bit, full keel, transom rudder (makes for little predictable manoeuvres). Jack must just have jumped. 77d511174f07f3201fe6fd09233e8d1d.gif.840ed6c5a6b78f0c5128949520ddd8ea.gif

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1 hour ago, Priscilla said:

Pics please.

Google is your friend 1970's to today. Then take a pick and I'm sure you will get more than a handful.

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14 hours ago, woahboy said:

Sure is a sleek looking boat. But I have to say I like the more "traditional" boats that you own. And heck, there's no wood on that boat. What would you have to work on?

woahboy,

 

It depends on how you look at it if there is wood on it or not ? 

 

I’m shore that if the right crew were on board their could be plenty of wood on board and all hard wood. 

 

Also, I’m shore a few owners of other boats get a slight woody when looking at that boat don’t you think ? 

 

Anyway, fibreglass is the new wood of today anyway. LOL

 

pulpit

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On 2/1/2019 at 1:56 AM, Svanen said:

It's a heavy-displacement yacht with a full keel and transom-hung, tiller-steered rudder. It's pretty solid ('overbuilt'), and has a relatively small cabin. 

I like all of those features, but different people have different opinions about what makes "a good cruising boat". Many consider the Rustler as 'old-fashioned', as well as expensive.

All yachts are compromises, and the question is rather subjective. Happily, the Rustler brand provides an alternative to those dissatisfied with Beneteau/Bavaria type yachts.

Rustlers are certainly well-constructed yachts with an excellent reputation. The Princess Royal had a 36 for a long time, Blue Doublet. Her current boat is another Rustler (44 footer), this one named Ballochbuie. See further here.

And the 36, in particular, has been manufactured for a long time so there are a lot of them around.

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On 2/2/2019 at 5:56 AM, pulpit said:

woahboy,

 

It depends on how you look at it if there is wood on it or not ? 

 

I’m shore that if the right crew were on board their could be plenty of wood on board and all hard wood. 

 

Also, I’m shore a few owners of other boats get a slight woody when looking at that boat don’t you think ? 

 

Anyway, fibreglass is the new wood of today anyway. LOL

 

pulpit

Gotta agree with you mate. 

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Design selections is determined by the GGR race organizer. Of the 10 or so designs allowed by the GGR the Rustler, is the most powerful with the long waterline and highest ballast ratio. At least in my opinion any other allowed design is at a disadvantage. Unless someone discovers any design that is superior the Rustler is the obvious choice.

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Slight shift of topic: I wonder if they came up with a Huntebenelina Globe Race if there would be any finishers. Fun to speculate about (at least to me). 

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Always curious, when the ol' post count gets above 10k one does wonder if the member has time to go yachting or if indeed they are reliving the old days. No judgements but the prolifics tend to be influencers, kind of like forum versions of the Kardashians :)

Rustler 36's never sailed on one but I bet sure as shit that the view from the cockpit is just as good as the view from a Pogo and a lot cheaper...

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On 2/6/2019 at 8:17 PM, kinardly said:

Slight shift of topic: I wonder if they came up with a Huntebenelina Globe Race if there would be any finishers. Fun to speculate about (at least to me). 

Bizarelly, the Oceanis 43 and the Sun Fizz 43 participating in the "longue route" have just rounded the Horn. So that's 0% failure for the time being. The aluminium boats and the GRP boats are doing well, the steel boats not so well...

http://longueroute2018.com/entrants.html

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