s.v.Wavelength

eleictric outboard for a dinghy

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To replace a heavy mercury outboard I intend to buy an electric one for my Zodiac 2.60S.

I think I have mainly two options:

- Torqeedo 1103C  (new from march 2019)

- Epropulsion Spirit

The Spirit is cheaper, the battery is a bit larger, and the engine  is partly made of aluminium (zinc-anode protected) and exists of 2 parts.

The new Torqeedo claims only 33 dB soundlevel, and has an incorporated GPS and a possible link to smartphone exists of 3 parts  and is partly plastic.

When I read all(?) comments on the forum I think the complaints on noiselevel do not count anymore for the new Torqeedo. It looks like they copied the good things from the Spirit in this 1103C and if the specifications on paper are correct they are maybe better than  the spirit in that matter?

What I miss in both engines is that there is no anti-theft protection for the battery. If I sail in the dinghy to a place and go for a walk (or a drink or  meal) I can lock the complete engine with some outboard-lock but somebody can easily steal the battery. And if the figures are right, the weight of the Torqeedo 9kW battery is 7 kg, the Spirit battery almost 10kg, so not a pleasure to carry.

Maybe somebody has already a solution for this problem for a torqeedo or for the spirit?

 

 

 

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You've just gotta have a lockable locker on the dinghy.  At least the Spirit only has the removable battery.  The Torqueedo has a removable battery AND the tiller/brains piece....   

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Bull City has reported good results with his Torqeedo, but he has it on an H-boat rather than on a dinghy.

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I never thought much about theft but have owned and used the Torqueedo for three years now. We added the larger battery last year to extend the range and kept the 5kw as a hot spare. Couldn't be happier with the performance, convenience and portability.

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Might want to also consider the Electric Paddle EP carry.  I have one of these and it is a bit more efficient and lighter than the other options out there.

https://www.electricpaddle.com/

I think we are going to see more and more electric propulsion systems for dinghies and sailboats as the batteries get better and cheaper.

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I have a 2018 Torqueedo on a 2.4 mtr dinghy and I love the concept and not having and petrol/oil on board but the outboard is a bit disappointing. 

The paint is blowing off the ali top section, the tiller handle is too long, long a delay on the throttle and the shaft way too long for a dinghy. I see that they have fixed the last 2 items. I am also on my 3rd sheer pin for no good reason. 

Battery lasts for ages though and being modular it is easy to get on and off. 

I cut down the shaft by 100mm and cut a bit of the tiller which has helped. 

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Had a battery start on my Yamaha 15hp outboard for our RIB, installed by the PO.

The Yammy was of course bulletproof but the battery caused endless problems: we were always tripping on the cable as we moved around the RIB, causing bad connections; and keeping it well charged was an issue; plus the extra space it took up.

I finally removed it and just used the pull-start on the engine, it always started first or second pull anyway.....

I wouldn't even think of an electric o/b for a dinghy, I want a dinghy to be as simple as possible to deploy and use.

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I've had a torqueedo 1003 for about 5 years and love it. No complaints at all. As to theft, I lock the body to the transom as you do any outboard and either take the battery with me or lock it with a cable lock 

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5 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

 

I wouldn't even think of an electric o/b for a dinghy, I want a dinghy to be as simple as possible to deploy and use.

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard. Far far less to go wrong. Pick what you like, but I've cleaned enough carbs and fouled plugs for one lifetime.

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13 minutes ago, jimbojones said:

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard. Far far less to go wrong. Pick what you like, but I've cleaned enough carbs and fouled plugs for one lifetime.

Can’t say I agree either. 

Brand new Merc 3.3 $700 US 

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16 minutes ago, jimbojones said:

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard

Friends of ours with a Torquedo on their dinghy. In an uninhabited Tuamoto atoll. They stared in dismay at the LCD that showed an error message.

Their outboard needed a software upgrade... Try doing that with a rusty screwdriver and a 10mm wrench.

Conceptually simpler, but a lot less that the consumer can work on if things aren't working

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2 hours ago, jimbojones said:

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard. Far far less to go wrong. Pick what you like, but I've cleaned enough carbs and fouled plugs for one lifetime.

Get a Yammy.

I've had three so far. Changed the gear oil and a bit of anti-corrosion spray every now and then was total maintenance for >15 years on the two small ones (3hp and 15hp). As close to simple and bulletproof as you can get with a motor.......

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A bit off topic- but has anyone tried the Lehr propane outboards?  I like the concept, especially with the smaller dinghy/tender versions that use a normal BBQ bottle.  I am not in favor of storing gas anywhere on the boat, especially in the one lazarette locker in transom that a gas can would have to share with the propane tank.  I am curious if the Lehr has any merit.

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12 hours ago, jimbojones said:

I've had a torqueedo 1003 for about 5 years and love it. No complaints at all. As to theft, I lock the body to the transom as you do any outboard and either take the battery with me or lock it with a cable lock 

I wonder how you attached the cable lock on the battery? Is there something foreseen to attach a cable?

The dealer of the Spirit saw no solution for it. Would this be an advantage of the Torqeedo? Or did you find a solution yourself?

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1 hour ago, Hawaiidart said:

A bit off topic- but has anyone tried the Lehr propane outboards?  I like the concept, especially with the smaller dinghy/tender versions that use a normal BBQ bottle.  I am not in favor of storing gas anywhere on the boat, especially in the one lazarette locker in transom that a gas can would have to share with the propane tank.  I am curious if the Lehr has any merit.

Okay concept, shitty execution.

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1 hour ago, Hawaiidart said:

A bit off topic- but has anyone tried the Lehr propane outboards?  I like the concept, especially with the smaller dinghy/tender versions that use a normal BBQ bottle.  I am not in favor of storing gas anywhere on the boat, especially in the one lazarette locker in transom that a gas can would have to share with the propane tank.  I am curious if the Lehr has any merit.

friend of mine has one,  he likes it...   bottles easy to screw on / off    no worry about which direction in storing the motor...   a lot more power than the electrics   pretty quiet too

istream,  what is the issue  ?  i've never heard my friend complain about his..

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Heavy for its power, low quality construction. I know a couple people who have them. Both have buyer's remorse. 

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A review from Amazon:

Quote

Garbage. Poor design and terrible quality control.

The box my 5hp Lehr came in was perfect, it hadn't been dropped or mishandled in any way.

The gaskets don't line up. One of the brass connections is digging into the housing. The idle speed fluctuates. Tiller seems like it could break off easily. The worst part is that the engine doesn't turn the propeller. It will not turn the propeller in forward or reverse. Something is binding up the drive line. They must ship these directly from China to you without testing anything.

I read all the bad reviews before I bought it, and they all seemed to be related to the engine. I decided to buy it anyway since I'm a mechanic, and wouldn't have trouble fixing little issues.

I bought it at Worst Marine, and the guy I ordered it with said I could return it if I had a problem. When I tried to return it a few days later they said they don't take outboard returns. They still have a sign on the wall at Worst Marine that says they will exchange/refund/credit any purchase you are unsatisfied with. Fraud.

It appears that Lehr is not trying to improve their product over time. It looks like buying a Lehr next year will not mean that they have worked out any problems people had this year. There might be more problems. This is just greed with an eco friendly sticker on it.

 

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2 hours ago, s.v.Wavelength said:

I wonder how you attached the cable lock on the battery? Is there something foreseen to attach a cable?

The dealer of the Spirit saw no solution for it. Would this be an advantage of the Torqeedo? Or did you find a solution yourself

On a torqueedo, around the handle on the battery.

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14 hours ago, Zonker said:

Friends of ours with a Torquedo on their dinghy. In an uninhabited Tuamoto atoll. They stared in dismay at the LCD that showed an error message.

Their outboard needed a software upgrade... Try doing that with a rusty screwdriver and a 10mm wrench.

Conceptually simpler, but a lot less that the consumer can work on if things aren't working

Since they first became available electric outboard discussions often turn into traditionalist debates. Like the Pardey  readers telling folks they need to use oil lamps for nav lights. (Not that there is anything wrong with that)

I think there are strong arguments in favor of gas, range and power in particular, whereas electric is great for to and from a mooring, anchorage or beach with a smaller dingy. 

There are so many things on a modern boat that can fail that would be nearly impossible to fix in a remote place that I think that argument is specious. From parts for a diesel or outboard to navigation instruments you carry the spares and tools for the things you can fix and adapt when something fails that you can't fix.

Having grown up sailing dinghies, I like simple systems on my boats and feel my torqueedo fits with that.

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We have an EP Carry and like it more than expected. I don't have tons of hours on it, but it seems really good. It's the only outboard that easily fits our dinghies and it's really light. The battery can be charged from our tiny house system (on a sunny day) and I really like the people who make it. We had some good adventures and a couple of really fine cocktail cruises with it last summer. Cruising around quietly in beautiful places with friends is hard to beat.

 

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The EP is a touch noisier than I expected.  The Spirit 1.0 is pretty quiet but at twice the weight......makes the EP look pretty good.

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On 2/4/2019 at 12:17 PM, IStream said:

Heavy for its power, low quality construction. I know a couple people who have them. Both have buyer's remorse. 

Had a 5 HP Lehr on our Beneteau 210, but gave up on it in the second season. The metal band holding the propane canister has sharp edges - every time I replaced an empty my had came away bloody. Once, pulling on the can to reach the screw valve resulted in the entire fuel pipe separating from the engine - not an easy repair. No easy way to monitor the amount of propane remaining in the canister - changing out to a fresh one while drifting into the marina was an unnecessary thrill. And the little green canisters need a safe storage place.

These issues are solvable with an auxiliary propane tank. I was frustrated and tossed in the towel. Replaced the Lehr with a Tohatsu Sail-Pro.

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On 2/4/2019 at 11:38 AM, Hawaiidart said:

A bit off topic- but has anyone tried the Lehr propane outboards?  I like the concept, especially with the smaller dinghy/tender versions that use a normal BBQ bottle.  I am not in favor of storing gas anywhere on the boat, especially in the one lazarette locker in transom that a gas can would have to share with the propane tank.  I am curious if the Lehr has any merit.

The only ones I know of seriously regret ever believing in that concept.  Expensive to run (compare to gas), PITA to get the gas canisters (compared to gas) ans the biggest gripe - they are a PITA to get started.  Other than that they are sort of ok

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I have yet to see anyone use a Lehr in the Eastern Caribbean.

I do remember someone on the VHF cruisers giving one away for free 'spares or repair '.

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Thank you for the replies.  The Lehr propane seems like such a practical idea.  It's too bad the company is not addressing consumer responses. This explains why I have never seen anyone use one.  I guess it's back to gas and oil- like going back to 1902- for my outboard.  The electric is a good option but I'm not hearing that they have the range I need from an anchorage in the San Juans or farther north to a town with an ice-cream store.

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On 2/4/2019 at 3:16 PM, jimbojones said:

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard. Far far less to go wrong. Pick what you like, but I've cleaned enough carbs and fouled plugs for one lifetime.

It isn't 100X simpler at all, just the complexity is hidden in ways you can't see and certainly can't fix.

So far I've got a bit over 10 years trouble-free out of my baby Honda 2HP 4 stroke outboard. If/when it dies I'll consider the market then.

I like the idea of electric driven outboards, just not convinced the current offerings are suitable for *my* use cases. YMMV.

FKT

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On 2/3/2019 at 6:16 PM, jimbojones said:

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard. Far far less to go wrong. Pick what you like, but I've cleaned enough carbs and fouled plugs for one lifetime.

The complexity of a battery / electric system is just hidden. Too, batteries suck and are probably ~90% as good as they're ever going to be. :ph34r:

I like the Torqeedo that I use for what we do with it. However, for lots of use cases it's not even close to competitive with gas. Also, I've been into it to repair the electronics and battery and there's no way that it's simpler than a small gas engine.

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On 2/3/2019 at 8:16 PM, jimbojones said:

An electric is 100 times simpler than a gas outboard. Far far less to go wrong. Pick what you like, but I've cleaned enough carbs and fouled plugs for one lifetime.

Matches my experience as well.

There's absolutely no comparison between the amount and complexity of regular maintenance for even simple gas outboards compared to "rinse occasionally and plug the battery in a charger". No boating magazine will devote lengthy articles to "Get your electric outboard ready for Spring", or "Lower drive shaft maintenance" or whatever, but you find those regularly in the pages of "Practical Boat Owner".

The key metric here would be how resilient a technology is for "intermittent" or infrequent use vs. continuous use with regular scheduled maintenance. Only electric that's ever failed me was due to a dead lead-acid battery (sudden end of life).

36 minutes ago, weightless said:

The complexity of a battery / electric system is just hidden. Too, batteries suck and are probably ~90% as good as they're ever going to be. :ph34r:

I like the Torqeedo that I use for what we do with it. However, for lots of use cases it's not even close to competitive with gas. Also, I've been into it to repair the electronics and battery and there's no way that it's simpler than a small gas engine.

Not a fan of tying GPS, etc. into the outboard controls; added features are unnecessary and just add failure modes.

That aside, I'm not sure we've seen the end of optimization in weight and/or power input/propulsion delivered.

On the smaller end, the ElectricPaddle, for example, uses about 1/3 the electric power compared to a traditional trolling motor for same or slightly better speeds. Not sure all the other electric outboards are equally well tuned - yet, so  effective capacity might still allow for some improvements, even of raw capacity should have plateaued.

Still, electrics are not for everyone. If your requirements for range and or burst power fall outside the scenarios well covered by existing electrics, better to know that up front and stick with technology that fits.


 

 

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I'm sure that electric will be the way to go for all/almost all applications in "the future."  In the meanwhile, I have not seen a brand or model that meets my needs and desires in terms of range and power.  Until something else comes along, I'm going to have to stick with fossil fuels other than any of the "anes."

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1 hour ago, green03 said:

Not a fan of tying GPS, etc. into the outboard controls; added features are unnecessary and just add failure modes.

Yeah, on the 1003 the main board with gps and controllers is in the same box as the battery. There isn't a user friendly way to separate them. The battery is hazmat. If anything goes wrong on the board or with the connectors it's not easy to overnight the board to the shop. Also, it's not simple to replace the battery without replacing all the fancy control electronics, gps and so on. The Torqeedo is a joy when it works and it does work most of the time. It is simple to use, clean and quiet. However, over the years we've had lots of failures on the 1003. Mechanical bits have broken, the throttle sensor magnet wasted away, battery cells have failed, connectors have failed, the lip seal failed, a charger failed... That's just the list that comes to mind as I type this. I've done my share of keeping gas motors going in remote places. They're smelly and noisy and filthy and annoying and fiddly. I get that. I've also kept a 1003 running in a place with good services. The gas motors are comparatively much, much simpler to keep running. If you use a battery / electric outboard long enough something fancy and expensive in it will fail. Some of the bits that will fail aren't simple to fix. If you need the services of a guy with an oscilloscope on his bench to make repairs you could probably buy a new gas outboard motor for the same money. I think there is a good deal of quality of life value to be had from battery powered outboards. They have that and zero emissions at the point of use and stealth. They have some niche uses where they are the best. Still, in many, perhaps most, services they are worse than gas in just about every measurable way.

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2 hours ago, green03 said:

On the smaller end, the ElectricPaddle, for example, uses about 1/3 the electric power compared to a traditional trolling motor for same or slightly better speeds. Not sure all the other electric outboards are equally well tuned - yet, so  effective capacity might still allow for some improvements, even of raw capacity should have plateaued.

Still, electrics are not for everyone. If your requirements for range and or burst power fall outside the scenarios well covered by existing electrics, better to know that up front and stick with technology that fits.


 

 

Green had this to say about trolling motors (compared to the EP). I don't know much about any of it but I own an EP and like it. I also like gas outboards, but not for a dinghy. I mostly row and gas outboards really fuck with the peace when cruising. I know, everyone has an inflatable and inflatables don't row, but lots of anchorages are like motorsports arenas and I don't like it, not one bit. Do you hear me?

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6 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

inflatables don't row

If folks would put small keels on them and use less horrific oars and locks they'd enjoy rowing them more.

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Our RIB (Avon) rowed OK, rarely needed to as our Yammy was so reliable.......

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3 hours ago, SailRacer said:

What about a trolling motor if it suits you?

They're cheap. You can get aftermarket propellers for them that may work better at non-trolling speeds. However, they are heavy and they require heavy batteries. Well, technically you could run some off certain Li-Ion battery packs, but then you lose the advantage of cheap.

They are also not that efficient; your range will be 1/3 of what you can get with the same battery from an optimized design like the Electric Paddle. At least, that's what I determined comparing my existing trolling motor to the new one when I upgraded.

I understand "cheap", but I'm glad to put lifting batteries behind me. My dinghy is a bit too heavy/big for the design point for the EP, therefore they top speed isn't exiting, but still the top speed is a tad higher than for my TM - I suspect just enough to feel it if you tried them side by side -- however I did my comparison using GPS averaged over a 1/4 mile or so.

I'm also glad to get weight off the stern of my dinghy. The EP is noticeably lighter and with motor at the top instead of immersed, it's better balanced when raised; in fact raising and lowering is a single pull/push on the control stick. Also has a "key" that can be used as a dead man switch - haven't seen that on any trolling motor I used.

But, sure, I've survived many years of using TMs, and in terms of power and range (given enough lead acid) they fit a comparable niche to using an EP. (With the motor below the water a TM is a bit quieter than the EP).

Torqeedo and company would get me better speeds, but that's something I don't really need/want and they are heavier, which is a deal breaker for me.

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Electric outboard

 

 

from all the comments up to now I learned a lot.

 

My idea to replace my gas outboard by an electric one is only getting stronger.

 

I think that I prefer a solution with an integrated battery in stead of an external battery, although it can have some advantages (price, more easily follow a new technology by replacing).

 

That is the reason that the EP-carry is not so interesting (next to the lack of distributorship in Europe and the noise level!). Other solutions as Minikota, Yamaha etc. are not the best solution for me.

 

The Torqeedo and the Spirit seem to be quite equal but:

 

Noise level seems to be an advantage of the Spirit, but Torqeedo says that the new 1103 C can be better ( in their new folder they say 33 dB but I am still waiting for an explanation on that figure from their R&D department)

 

UV resistance could be a problem for Torqeedo: a lot of plastic and I red a lot of complaints.

The Torqueedo salesman warned me to to protect it from the sun if it is not in use.

 

Weight is an advantage for the Torqeedo especially because of the 3 parts what makes handling easier

Anti-theft protection is probably better for the Spirit (the battery can more easily be protected with a chainlock) and the 3 parts of the Torqeedo make this more complicated.

 

IP67 and seawater protection looks OK for both, the plastic of the Torqeedo is maybe safer then the aluminium of the Spirit but the Sprit has a floating battery.

 

GPS is an advantage of the Torqeedo but if some reviews are right it makes the Torqeedo much less reliable (and there are a lot of reviews where the reliability in general of the Torqeedo is a point of doubt for me).

 

Price the new Torqeedo 1103c is more expensive.

 

I am still studying the project but up to now I like to thank you all for your comments on this topic.

(a pity I could not correct the type error in the topicname, it must me electricity!)

 

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Not sure I'd call the EP-Carry "noisy". And yes, I like it quiet. I would say you can tell it's there. And the reason you can, is because our ears are logarithmic sensors, otherwise, compared to any combustion engine, you'd not even notice. That said, a TM is a bit quieter. (I don't know the Spirit).

I much better understand not wanting to deal with an import w/o a local distributor.

Weight considerations are twofold: one is about carrying, the other about weight at the stern. A collapsible design addresses one, but not the other.

In my case, having the battery separable works really well. It fits into the motor well, where it's out of the way; and I can remove it w/o having to bring the motor. I sometimes take the dinghy places where I can recharge the battery but leave the motor securely on board.

Price: I like to amortize price over expected life time and number of uses. Willing to pay a bit more for stuff that I use frequently; if there's a real difference in quality or how it fits my parameters. Looks like you are narrowing down your choices after careful analysis.

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On 2/10/2019 at 12:56 AM, s.v.Wavelength said:

GPS is an advantage of the Torqeedo but if some reviews are right it makes the Torqeedo much less reliable

Do you know how the GPS is reported to cause reliability issues? I haven't noticed any GPS issues so I don't know but I would not expect one to cause a problem with the motor as such.

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11 hours ago, green03 said:

Not sure I'd call the EP-Carry "noisy". And yes, I like it quiet. I would say you can tell it's there. And the reason you can, is because our ears are logarithmic sensors, otherwise, compared to any combustion engine, you'd not even notice. That said, a TM is a bit quieter. (I don't know the Spirit).

I much better understand not wanting to deal with an import w/o a local distributor.

Weight considerations are twofold: one is about carrying, the other about weight at the stern. A collapsible design addresses one, but not the other.

In my case, having the battery separable works really well. It fits into the motor well, where it's out of the way; and I can remove it w/o having to bring the motor. I sometimes take the dinghy places where I can recharge the battery but leave the motor securely on board.

Price: I like to amortize price over expected life time and number of uses. Willing to pay a bit more for stuff that I use frequently; if there's a real difference in quality or how it fits my parameters. Looks like you are narrowing down your choices after careful analysis.

The character of the sound matters a lot. I find a high pitched electronic whine to be much more annoying than the EP's gear rumble, even if the former has a lower SPL. 

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I like the simplicity of the EP-Carry, it is basically the electric outboard that I'd design and seems to use standard batteries, motor controller, and motor.  My only concern is that the gear train is designed as a wear component and doesn't last that long (I think ~100 hours), so you'd want to buy some spares just in case the company isn't around in a few years.

I'm mostly a rower, but can see getting one of these in a years or two when I start doing more cruising with my family.  

I owned and sold a Honda 2hp outboard.  It was very reliable and easy to work on, but also very loud, I hate dealing with gasoline, and cleaning the carb.

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3 hours ago, Alex W said:

I like the simplicity of the EP-Carry, it is basically the electric outboard that I'd design and seems to use standard batteries, motor controller, and motor.  My only concern is that the gear train is designed as a wear component and doesn't last that long (I think ~100 hours), so you'd want to buy some spares just in case the company isn't around in a few years.

I'm mostly a rower, but can see getting one of these in a years or two when I start doing more cruising with my family.  

I owned and sold a Honda 2hp outboard.  It was very reliable and easy to work on, but also very loud, I hate dealing with gasoline, and cleaning the carb.

100 hours??  That’s not particularly encouraging.  Where/How do you come up with this number?

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16 hours ago, Veeger said:

100 hours??  That’s not particularly encouraging.  Where/How do you come up with this number?

It is in the FAQ on their website:

 

Quote

 

Maintenance, care and service

What maintenance is required?
After use in salt water, rinse the prop and gear area with fresh water. Immerse or simply pour 1-2 cups of fresh water into the gear opening. Charge your battery pack soon after use. Inspect your prop periodically and replace after every hundred hours of use. No other maintenance is required.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Alex W said:

It is in the FAQ on their website:

 

 

That looks like it's just talking about replacing the prop...unless I'm missing something, which happens occasionally.

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The prop and gear unit are sold as one piece.  The price is reasonable at $80, it is just unique and would be hard to source elsewhere. 

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On 2/7/2019 at 7:37 PM, Russell Brown said:

Green had this to say about trolling motors (compared to the EP). I don't know much about any of it but I own an EP and like it. I also like gas outboards, but not for a dinghy. I mostly row and gas outboards really fuck with the peace when cruising. I know, everyone has an inflatable and inflatables don't row, but lots of anchorages are like motorsports arenas and I don't like it, not one bit. Do you hear me?

i don't know about that ...  my C30 has powered my 3000lb 20 ftr   2+ miles on a battery charge  while  EP's website says

" Other small boats up to 13 feet in length and 600 lbs. "

 

it  would be interesting to compare them on my boat..

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The EP carry can be ordered in a high thrust version. I think it's about twice the thrust and uses up the battery in half the time.

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Check out the guys at sailing uma who replaced their original petrol on with electric and then the electric replaced with petrol

They love elec engines.but.......

 

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The EP's design of prop + lower gear as consumable is an interesting choice. It allows the gear to be water lubricated, so you don't need a seal and eliminate a possible cause of water contamination. Like Alex, ordering an extra prop kit just in case was my first thought.

If you run the high thrust version at half throttle, you'd get the same lifetime as the standard version. Power/thrust being nonlinear you can play interesting games with range vs. speed. But there are some situations where the extra thrust/speed may be needed over a short-ish distance (chop, adverse wind, tidal currents).

@GrMstDrd: at 3,000 lbs I suspect you'll find the EP a bit underpowered unless your hull is super easily driven. In my case, I get a bit extra speed over my 40# trolling motor and if I were to dial the EP down the last fraction of a knot to the speed I used to get, I think it would approach the same running time and distance as I got with two lead acids before (40 min each to 50% discharge). For my case, the longest range I typically need to cover allows me to run the standard EP at full speed for 1hr.

I also found out that by changing fore/aft trim I can get another 7-10% speed (and therefore range) if I need to.

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To make my choice I will visit the Amsterdam bot show this week. Certainly the Torqeedo and the Spirit will be there, so I hope I can make a good evaluation.

 

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