Sign in to follow this  
burndoc

Seasickness Remedies

Recommended Posts

i would like to know what works well for you guys. My wife has a tough time and always takes Dramamine before flights, boats, whatever. I get it very rarely. Last time a few years ago fishing off Cabo.  I think rough seas, smell and not being able to look forward combined to cause a problem. I usually use Phenergan as Iwas told once it can break it after it starts. Gave my last tablet to my mother in law when we were all away together and she was hung over with a three hour drive with my father in law. Before I fill a new script I was wondering what everybody uses especially when you are out for a few days. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stugeron 15, AKA Cinnarizine has been my go to for 20 years. A bit tough to find in the states however, but it can be done

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never had even a moment of seasickness or any other motion sickness ever.....lucky. Mrs PB who occasionally had a bout tried this and that. We figured out that if she would simply take a nap when we started out she would wake up and she was fine. It was so consistent that we planned it that way. YMMV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insert one uncoated aspirin in the belly button then band aid over to hold it in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Throatwarbler-Mangrove said:

Scopolamine patches do it for me. 

Have you tried after symptoms start? I have written for my dad and others but they wear before cruise. I am looking for me for that occasional time I get a surprise attack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 40 years ago my family doctor, who was a former Navy doc, wrote me a script for phenergan with an ephedrine chaser.  The ephedrine kept the drowsys away and prevented what I think is one of the most insidious effects of seasickness, listlessness.  It got a lot harder to get after about 1990, when every pharmacist looked at me as the next meth producer.  I suspect any kind of a stimulant would work.

For me, the stuff was bulletproof.  I was generally OK, but in my delivery days there were times when I needed some help.  Being upside down in a big seaway with diesel dripping down your face while bilgewater formed tsumanis under you as you worked on a cranky engine was what this stuff was built for.  If you could hold it down for a half an hour you'd be good to go.  In retrospect I think some of its effectiveness for me was the security blanket of not worrying about it.  It is the only remedy I know of which works after symptoms appear.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Husband has has good luck with patches -- be vigilant not to touch eye area after touching patch-- and antivert. I think antivert is Bonine?  Use in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never used with the ephedrine. Heard it as a Coastie cocktail. 

Heard focusing problems

with the patch also

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to get seasick on even the calmest days. My first cruises in the Navy, well actually all of them, were horrible. I had to carry a trash bag in my back pocket in case we surfaced (submariner) and on a few occasions got sick even while submerged at snorkel depth. I took so many dramamine that my body would start feeling seasick as soon as I popped one, even if we weren't yet at sea.

While working offshore in my 30s someone advised me to just drink a beer or two before getting underway to prep your balance system, which worked at first, but of course at some point wore off.

Oddly, I've always loved sailing, even after 4 wretched years in the Navy. I can recall getting seriously nauseous on flat calm sailing days well into my forties. I tried Sea Bands (ridiculous and embarrassing when I look back at the old pics), and any number of patent medications. None helped.

To be honest, I think how I overcame seasickness was as I got older I became more accustomed to alcohol consumption. What once might have caused me twirly bends and vomiting now just produces a pleasant buzz. In the last 25 years or so, the only time I've gotten seasick was getting underway into a stiff headwind after a really, magnificent, amazingly deep night out.

Not recommending alcohol as a curative, nor writing it off. You be the judge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, burndoc said:

Have you tried after symptoms start? I have written for my dad and others but they wear before cruise. I am looking for me for that occasional time I get a surprise attack

I really only need it offshore, so planning ahead is easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, burndoc said:

Never used with the ephedrine. Heard it as a Coastie cocktail. 

Heard focusing problems

with the patch also

Only problems I had with the patch were touching my eyes and blowing up a pupil, which kind of messed up vision but wasn't debilitating, and mild hallucinations which were, as Abby Hoffman once said, just gravy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I both get it, mine goes in 24 hours but hers can go on for days.

last few passages she used ranitidine and antacids, worked fine, so I guess she gets gastritis once the vomiting hits.

have tried all the remedies, side effects get me, so planning on trying the NASA cocktail, phenergan and  pseudephedrine for the next trip.

My impression is that fighting the boats motion makes it worse, so I try to become one with the boat as soon as possible.

Have heard a friend sleeps early in the passage and this stops it, I guess this might be a way to accomodate to the boats motion early on.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sea-bands acupressure wristbands and Tums.

Not kidding here. I've seen a client recover and continue fishing on a snotty day in the Cook Inlet.  

I use them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Willin' said:

I used to get seasick on even the calmest days. My first cruises in the Navy, well actually all of them, were horrible. I had to carry a trash bag in my back pocket in case we surfaced (submariner) and on a few occasions got sick even while submerged at snorkel depth. I took so many dramamine that my body would start feeling seasick as soon as I popped one, even if we weren't yet at sea.

While working offshore in my 30s someone advised me to just drink a beer or two before getting underway to prep your balance system, which worked at first, but of course at some point wore off.

Oddly, I've always loved sailing, even after 4 wretched years in the Navy. I can recall getting seriously nauseous on flat calm sailing days well into my forties. I tried Sea Bands (ridiculous and embarrassing when I look back at the old pics), and any number of patent medications. None helped.

To be honest, I think how I overcame seasickness was as I got older I became more accustomed to alcohol consumption. What once might have caused me twirly bends and vomiting now just produces a pleasant buzz. In the last 25 years or so, the only time I've gotten seasick was getting underway into a stiff headwind after a really, magnificent, amazingly deep night out.

Not recommending alcohol as a curative, nor writing it off. You be the judge.

WTF is an amazingly deep night out?  And if its what I guess you are referring to (benefit of the doubt here), why would you do that before setting out into a "stiff headwind"?  

Reading your post leads me to think about suggesting AA.  

Had a crew member who thought alcohol was the bee's knees.  We stuffed her in a quarterberth, sail-tied a bucket around her neck and forgot she was on board.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Nettles said:

Only problems I had with the patch were touching my eyes and blowing up a pupil, which kind of messed up vision but wasn't debilitating, and mild hallucinations which were, as Abby Hoffman once said, just gravy.

Hallucinations are always fun for the rest of the crew.  Never had a crew member who was wearing a patch actually contribute to the race.  Mostly they sat on the rail and didn't tell us about the white rabbits they saw jumping from wave to wave.  For that we were grateful.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Left Shift said:

WTF is an amazingly deep night out

Judge much?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

WTF is an amazingly deep night out?  And if its what I guess you are referring to (benefit of the doubt here), why would you do that before setting out into a "stiff headwind"?  

Reading your post leads me to think about suggesting AA.  

Had a crew member who thought alcohol was the bee's knees.  We stuffed her in a quarterberth, sail-tied a bucket around her neck and forgot she was on board.  

Very valid point there, Lefty.  As I said, not recommending  a cure. Just my experience over the years.  You may be right. I may need a AA intervention.

As far as an Amazingly deep night out, now that lad, is something you'll have to hope you ever achieve, perhaps with a crew  of close mates you've just busted your ass with on a miracle repair job for ten days in a remote port, getting underway in adverse conditions to meet the boss's family holiday schedule half a world away. That night out, before getting underway on a two ocean crossing was all time! 

I'll fess up now, it was a motor yacht I was on in this instance, but headwinds are headwinds and everyone aboard suffered the effects. My original point wasn't to talk about what not to do before getting underway, but what has worked for me when I suffered the seasick blues.

I stand by my recco to try a beer or two before getting underway if you're worried about getting seasick. 

YMMV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more vote for Stugeron (Cinnarizine) here.

Doesn't give me any noticable side effect, not even drowsiness. Still, probably helps falling asleep when I want to.

Lots of pros use it, AFAIK. But it's really a personnal thing. You have to try to see if it works for you.

I've tried Scopolamine patches once. Did the trick for the seasickness, but it made me sleep for hours...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Hallucinations are always fun for the rest of the crew.  Never had a crew member who was wearing a patch actually contribute to the race.  Mostly they sat on the rail and didn't tell us about the white rabbits they saw jumping from wave to wave.  For that we were grateful.

 

Mine were pretty mild - a line of print in a book would give a little wiggle or I'd see a quick flash of light (like a flashbulb, usually blue) at night.  I was a Deadhead in my college years in the 70's and 80's, I had no trouble seperating reality from fiction. 

I forgot to mention my usual defense, which was pretzel rods and ginger ale.  There were many times I rescued an entire crew from misery by an enforced application.  You had to be proactive though, once they started spewing it was too late.  At the first signs, like listlessness, I'd break out the rods and ginger ale and make everyone partake.  I'd guess it had about an 85% success rate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

Judge much?

No, just puzzled by the expression.  Never heard it before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Nettles said:

Mine were pretty mild - a line of print in a book would give a little wiggle or I'd see a quick flash of light (like a flashbulb, usually blue) at night.  I was a Deadhead in my college years in the 70's and 80's, I had no trouble seperating reality from fiction. 

I forgot to mention my usual defense, which was pretzel rods and ginger ale.  There were many times I rescued an entire crew from misery by an enforced application.  You had to be proactive though, once they started spewing it was too late.  At the first signs, like listlessness, I'd break out the rods and ginger ale and make everyone partake.  I'd guess it had about an 85% success rate.

Candied ginger and those pretzel nuggets w peanut butter filling is our go to.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I carry potassium gluconate.   I have seen them stabilize people who were vomiting, something Dramamine cannot do.

For a 200 lb person, 2 pills, will cause a 2-4  hour rest/recovery nap and all was well.  For the crewman prone to sea sickness a maintenance dose of 1 pill every 6 hours or so seems to work well.   These are OTC, so as a delivery captain I can’t get in trouble for dispensing drugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to get seasick as a kid going fishing with my dad, my grandfther (an Admiral with a few miles under the keel) always told me the best remedy was to lie under a pine tree for a while.

 

.

.

.

.I'll take my hat now...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, chuso007 said:

I used to get seasick as a kid going fishing with my dad, my grandfther (an Admiral with a few miles under the keel) always told me the best remedy was to lie under a pine tree for a while.

 

.

.

.

.I'll take my hat now...

The English version requires an apple tree. :P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, burndoc said:

Have you tried after symptoms start? I have written for my dad and others but they wear before cruise. I am looking for me for that occasional time I get a surprise attack

I always get some motion sickness at sea, hard for me to shake it even after being offshore for 6 months in the Navy. I tried the Stugeron (Cinnarizine) on the Lightship Race out of SF a few years ago and it worked amazing. I've only heard that you can take it once you feel the sickness coming on but have no personal experience.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Snore said:

I carry potassium gluconate.   I have seen them stabilize people who were vomiting, something Dramamine cannot do.

For a 200 lb person, 2 pills, will cause a 2-4  hour rest/recovery nap and all was well.  For the crewman prone to sea sickness a maintenance dose of 1 pill every 6 hours or so seems to work well.   These are OTC, so as a delivery captain I can’t get in trouble for dispensing drugs.

That was the go-to when I had to run up the flux tower, with the damn thing swaying with every gust of wind. The potassium is also in a shit-ton of raw fish/sushi/ceviche. That fish before a trip never failed for me, regardless how rough the conditions. I never got seasick on a boat because the horizon made sense, and I wasn't trying to read data. But swaying in a guyed-tower, hoo Johnny, the gut takes on a mind of its own.

Apparently the fish has the perfect combination of Potassium, Hydroxytryptophan and Magnesium. Works for about two days, recharge as necessary. It kept working well after the potassium supplements stopped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, mad said:

The English version requires an apple tree. :P

The US version requires carrying an oar over your shoulder and walking inland until someone asks what its for.  Then sitting down under a tree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, RedFlag said:

One more vote for Stugeron (Cinnarizine) here.

Doesn't give me any noticable side effect, not even drowsiness. Still, probably helps falling asleep when I want to.

Lots of pros use it, AFAIK. But it's really a personnal thing. You have to try to see if it works for you.

I've tried Scopolamine patches once. Did the trick for the seasickness, but it made me sleep for hours...

Checked with my hospital pharmacist and it is difficult to get in States

probably stick with the Phenergan

Potassium Gluconate is an interesting idea

Thanks everyone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, burndoc said:

Checked with my hospital pharmacist and it is difficult to get in States

probably stick with the Phenergan

Potassium Gluconate is an interesting idea

Thanks everyone

That's the one downside - Sold over the counter in most places in the world as an antihistamine. Go figure - You may be able to get it in Canada, some of the islands in the Caribbean also have it. Sint Maarten for sure, as I have picked it up there.

I also keep a box of compazine suppositories  on board for emergency use. If someone is so sick they can't keep pills down, it's my go to fix. Besides, in addition to knocking out the nausea, it typically makes em sleepy so I can put them to bed, lash em in a bunk with a plastic garbage bag taped nearby. Only had to do it twice with crew, worked like a champ both times

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going to Ireland soon. Maybe get some there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try the bands Doc. Nothing to lose, a lot to gain. My wife enjoyed a sporty helicopter ride over Sedona last year with these.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes lots of great suggestions. Fortunately for me it is rare it happens to me. So I need something once it starts which I has been the Phenergen. I don't know if it is easier for my wife because she gets motion sick and just takes the Dramamine.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The few times I felt sea sick I was in an enclosed cabin. The cure was to get out on deck and watch the horizon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother-in-law used to get very seasick, especially the first few days of a trip. Now he uses scopolamine patches, and they work great. I think he still can feel unwell in heavier seas, but still much better than without the patch.

He actually applies it a day or two before flying to wherever they are sailing.

He's also tried supplementing with ginger in the past, but I don't think he does that any more.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, burndoc said:

Going to Ireland soon. Maybe get some there

It's OTC in Europe. Also sell it at Boot's the Chemist shops at the airport. may be under the generic Cinnarizine name - Grab a couple of boxes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, MaxHeadroom said:

It's OTC in Europe. Also sell it at Boot's the Chemist shops at the airport. may be under the generic Cinnarizine name - Grab a couple of boxes. 

Except in France... :angry:

When buying it, check two things :

- Cinnarizine also comes in association with another active ingredient (don't remember the name right now). Don't buy that drug. Only Sugeron or the equivalent generic Cinnarizine.

- There are different dosages available. Standard for seasickness is 25mg. 3-4 takes a day, max 6.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ginger powder in a capsule. Worst case, it like puking stir fry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this