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So I've shared my turkey and venison sausage gumbo recipe a few times on this forum. We just killed the last of our seafood gumbo this week.

What's the favorite thing you've made this month? (looking for some good ideas here)

While the weather is still cold, this is a favorite...(I just use chicken thighs, though. It's amazing)

https://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/coq-au-vin/

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Three resipese from Ree in a rowe!

https://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/pasta-with-pancetta-and-leeks/

wife loves thisse oune...... I use bacone.....                          :) 

Bacon might even make VWAP's recipe palatable!

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Real Swiss cheese fondue for a cold night. 

Mix half and half Gruyere and Vacherin (very stinky, a friend of mine said it smells like a wet fart) 100-150 grams (4-6 oz) per person. In a heavy fondue pot rub one or two smashed garlic cloves. Add  a pinch of nutmeg and some white pepper. add about 75 ml ( 2-3 oz) of dry white wine per person,  heat when hot add cheese and melt to combine, add a slurry of corn starch and kirsch maybe  25 ml or so (not too much). If it does not combine completely add a bit more starch in water. Cook for few minutes the Vacherin will mellow considerably. 

Keep at low heat on burner and use with a hearty bread to dip in the cheese serve with sour pickles and onions and a salad

Wash down with oceans of white wine 

Can't find Vacherin use old Appenzeller fuck Emmenthal (the one with holes) 

 

 

     

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1 hour ago, On The Hard said:

So I've shared my turkey and venison sausage gumbo recipe a few times on this forum. We just killed the last of our seafood gumbo this week.

What's the favorite thing you've made this month? (looking for some good ideas here)

While the weather is still cold, this is a favorite...(I just use chicken thighs, though. It's amazing)

https://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/coq-au-vin/

 

 

That one looks good too. As it turns out I’m in charge of the dinner menu next week so this will be on the list. Along with snaggys suggestion. 

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I made Guinea clam chowder. 

Fresh clams right off the boat, potatoes, onions, carrots, sweet corn, and celery.

Steam the clams-- when they open, drain off all the juice and cook the vegetables in the juice. Mince the clams and throw them in with the cooked vegetables.

Add some minced garlic, butter, Old Bay, pepper, hot paprika and white wine, and a dash of Tabasco.

This is a clear broth clam chowder. Serve with toasted baguettes.

Oh yeah I forgot something. Bacon!

Fry up some really crispy bacon and crumble it into the chowder.

How the hell did I forget the bacon!?

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1 hour ago, chinabald said:

I will be trying this one soon. 

Verrey easey, and verrey goode!                                :)

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12 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

carne                                       :)

C197F97E-A425-4242-9388-AA0D81F72596.thumb.jpeg.a0b4d900a14bc759263b1e88c716066b.jpeg

This is the hot and spicy fried chicken sammich from the Biergarten across the street from where I live   It’s fuckin hotter than balls but fortunately with a flight of Belgium beers all is good

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I've finally caught up with Gen X or millenials or whoever, and made my first avocado toast.  Being in California, avocados are the state fruit, so I'm amazed I hadn't done it before.  I found a great recipe, from the joint in NY where it's said to have been invented.

Nolita-Style Avocado Toast

1 slice seven-grain sandwich bread (Oroweat Oatnut works well)
½ of a large ripe avocado
1 tablespoon olive oil mixed with 1 tablespoon lemon juice
Salt
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

  • Scoop the avocado into a bowl and mash it. 
  • Toast the bread so that it’s dark and firm. 
  • Spread the avocado from edge to edge of the toast, leaving no bread uncovered, mounding it smoothly in the center. 
  • Drizzle olive oil & lemon juice mix so that it rolls off onto the plate and soaks into the toast underneath. 
  • Grind on some sea salt and sprinkle with red pepper flakes. 
  • Slice toast on the diagonal and eat with a knife and fork.
  • And a glass of pinot noir.

I made the first half yesterday, and had to go back and make the other half for lunch today.  

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Bone in chicken thighs (try to find some reasonable sized ones that don't look like they came from a pterodactyl) marinated at room temp in the zest of a whole lemon, ground black pepper,  2 small smashed garlic cloves, a ounce or two of the juice from pickled jalapenos, (or just pickle juice and a drop or two of tabasco.) grated fresh ginger, fish sauce, a dash of soy sauce, and a heaping spoonful of tarragon. (3-4 hours, covered)

 Pre-heat oven to 350f. Get a sauce pan blazing hot with some olive oil. and sear those thighs skin side up for a minute or two. Turn the heat down to medium. squeeze in the juice of the lemon you zested., and flip the thighs to crisp the skin a little.

 In a baking dish slice a large onion into 1/8" slices, and add a pinch of salt. Put the thighs on top of the onions skin side up, and dump the juices from the sauce pan into the baking dish. Add a dash of dry white wine. Cover the baking dish with foil and put it in the oven for 45 minutes.

 Serve with rice (I like 3/4 regular short grain white with 1/4 Jasmine).....Squeeze the last of that lemon juice into the rice water as it's cooking. Steamed asparagus with butter a pinch of sea salt and a little black pepper.

 Dessert? Dark chocolate mousse with shaved bitter sweet chocolate and a dollop of honey whipped cream.

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If you like bacon with pasta, this recipe for carbonara from my Italian father-in-law is really good. He says it is more of a peasant dish than the version you get with heavy cream and peas. I've made this with thick cut peppered bacon instead of prosciutto and it is really good as well.

1 pound dry spaghetti
1 large onion finely chopped

4 fresh large eggs
8 ounces prosciutto 
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino

Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Freshly cracked black pepper
Sea salt

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add a generous amount of olive oil to the skillet (there should be about 1/8 to ¼ inch in the pan) and add the onion and sauté until completely softened. Add the prosciutto and saute until prosciutto is cooked through (I like to cook until the prosciutto is starting to crisp). Turn the heat to low.

When you put the onions on to saute bring about 6 quarts of generously salted water (it should taste like the ocean) to a boil, add the spaghetti and cook for 8-10 minutes or until al dente.

In a bowl whisk the eggs and the cheeses until well-combined.

This is the part of this dish that is a bit tricky and should be done fairly quickly so the pasta does not cool off as the residual heat in the pasta is needed to cook the eggs. When the pasta is done, drain and reserve a ½ cup of the cooking liquid. Leave pasta in colander. Add all the contents of the skillet (onions, prosciutto, and olive oil) into the pot that pasta was boiled in, then add in the pasta and place over low heat. Toss to combine all ingredients and heat through for a few seconds. If the pasta appears too dry add some EVOO and heat through.

Remove pot from the heat and slowly add the egg mixture to the pot stirring quickly until the eggs are incorporated into the pasta (stir quickly to prevent the eggs from scrambling . . . some actually prefer to let the eggs scramble a bit). Add about half of the grated cheeses and toss some more. If the sauce seems too thick, thin it out with some EVOO or some of the reserved water.

Season liberally with freshly cracked black pepper and additional grated cheese to taste.

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Bacon??? Yeah I've been making bacon...been pretty busy in the galley packing away the protein...venison hotdogs anyone???

20181219_072305.jpg

20190123_222341.jpg

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And to celebrate "The Cure" making it into the RRHOF...venison sopprassetta, venison bresaola, and a standard capicola...

20190118_204413.jpg

20190213_203641.jpg

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6dcb0189-dca4-4d2f-91cc-7b0bc510003a_1.4

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Yes, Son of a Sailor, I made that exact Carbonara dish a few days ago. It is perfect. More true italian flavor without the cream. There was plenty of heat in the pasta and water to cook the eggs. No need to allow the pasta to drain...or worse do the stupid rinse thing...just a quick pass thru the colander and straight into the bowl with the other hot items. Does need a shocking amount of salt in the water.

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I would think that the salt in the bacon, and Pecorino, and Parmigiano would be enough just by it's self....

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21 minutes ago, Grabbler said:

Bacon??? Yeah I've been making bacon...been pretty busy in the galley packing away the protein...venison hotdogs anyone???

20181219_072305.jpg

20190123_222341.jpg

Do you emulsify the hot dogs or just a couple times through a fine? Recipe?

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20 minutes ago, Grabbler said:

And to celebrate "The Cure" making it into the RRHOF...venison sopprassetta, venison bresaola, and a standard capicola...

20190118_204413.jpg

20190213_203641.jpg

Homemade capicola is awesome! Dang Grabbler . . . i'm going to have come visit you if keep posting stuff like this.

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We enter the Toboggan Nationals every February. At first it was just me, my mate Charley and my wife. and Charley, who fancies himself a gourmet cook and tailgate master would prepare a sumptuous repast in the parking lot. He excelled at sausages and marinaded tri tips. One year he broke down in tears after the wind blew over the table spilling the huge pot of Maryland Crab Soup made with fresh crabs he'd had shipped up from  Chessy.

Eventually the crew grew with friends, wives and kids attending and two years back we met up with a team of Geezers who were alum and instructors from Charley's Maryland high school who joined the tailgate. That was the first year my wife made a pot of OTH's Turkey Gumbo for the party. 

Last weekend Charley was crushed when the Geezers all walked right past his grill looking to fill up on Cheryl's gumbo. They'd been talking about it all summer. One meal made them certified Gumbologists. 

Thanks, OTH. Cheryl is now a Gumbo rock star.

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8 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Three resipese from Ree in a rowe!

https://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/pasta-with-pancetta-and-leeks/

wife loves thisse oune...... I use bacone.....                          :) 

That is almost exactly what I made for the family last night........I also use bacon, lots of bacon, but I don't use wine, I'll put that right next time!

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3 hours ago, bmiller said:

Do you emulsify the hot dogs or just a couple times through a fine? Recipe?

Yeah I go the full emulsification route... I do it in batches and keep it in the freezer as I go...basically the Ruhlman and Polcyn "Charcuterie" recipe that I've tweaked with venison and pork fat...lotta work for hotdogs for sure, but at least you know what's in them...same with the venison/shrimp boudin...note the extra bag for boudin balls...

20190210_190610.jpg

20190121_211105(1).jpg

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33 minutes ago, Grabbler said:

Yeah I go the full emulsification route... I do it in batches and keep it in the freezer as I go...basically the Ruhlman and Polcyn "Charcuterie" recipe that I've tweaked with venison and pork fat...lotta work for hotdogs for sure, but at least you know what's in them...same with the venison/shrimp boudin...note the extra bag for boudin balls...

20190210_190610.jpg

20190121_211105(1).jpg

What're you using for casing? Sheep intestine? It doesn't look like pork......

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On 2/14/2019 at 3:06 PM, Snaggletooth said:

Keye to life ist ballance                     :)

I’m am well balanced 

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6 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Lookes greate!  Nice tabelle Mr. D, youre handey worke to?

Nope

But I did build the 6 chair set

19 years ago

chair.jpg

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I really like American Mission style furniture.  Well done.  Those look superb.

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7 hours ago, P_Wop said:

I really like American Mission style furniture.  Well done.  Those look superb.

Not exactly "Mission style".... More "Arts and Crafts" style.... Or "Craftsman" style.

But yes, those are very nicely built chairs, that go nicely with the table, and the cat.

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Gee thanks fellers. They took a staggering amount of time to build. 48 m&t joints per chair. Won't be doing that again. I can't imagine what that grade of white oak must go for these days. 

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On 2/14/2019 at 3:31 PM, Grabbler said:

And to celebrate "The Cure" making it into the RRHOF...venison sopprassetta, venison bresaola, and a standard capicola...

20190118_204413.jpg

20190213_203641.jpg

I'm in love!  Wish I could find a place to make this. Looks like you've been perfecting this for a long time

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On 2/14/2019 at 5:59 PM, Willin' said:

We enter the Toboggan Nationals every February. At first it was just me, my mate Charley and my wife. and Charley, who fancies himself a gourmet cook and tailgate master would prepare a sumptuous repast in the parking lot. He excelled at sausages and marinaded tri tips. One year he broke down in tears after the wind blew over the table spilling the huge pot of Maryland Crab Soup made with fresh crabs he'd had shipped up from  Chessy.

Eventually the crew grew with friends, wives and kids attending and two years back we met up with a team of Geezers who were alum and instructors from Charley's Maryland high school who joined the tailgate. That was the first year my wife made a pot of OTH's Turkey Gumbo for the party. 

Last weekend Charley was crushed when the Geezers all walked right past his grill looking to fill up on Cheryl's gumbo. They'd been talking about it all summer. One meal made them certified Gumbologists. 

Thanks, OTH. Cheryl is now a Gumbo rock star.

We should get together! the only thing in our way is.....several thousand miles...  :-(

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On 2/15/2019 at 8:17 AM, Son of a Sailor said:

If you like bacon with pasta, this recipe for carbonara from my Italian father-in-law is really good. He says it is more of a peasant dish than the version you get with heavy cream and peas. I've made this with thick cut peppered bacon instead of prosciutto and it is really good as well.

1 pound dry spaghetti
1 large onion finely chopped

4 fresh large eggs
8 ounces prosciutto 
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino

Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Freshly cracked black pepper
Sea salt

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add a generous amount of olive oil to the skillet (there should be about 1/8 to ¼ inch in the pan) and add the onion and sauté until completely softened. Add the prosciutto and saute until prosciutto is cooked through (I like to cook until the prosciutto is starting to crisp). Turn the heat to low.

When you put the onions on to saute bring about 6 quarts of generously salted water (it should taste like the ocean) to a boil, add the spaghetti and cook for 8-10 minutes or until al dente.

In a bowl whisk the eggs and the cheeses until well-combined.

This is the part of this dish that is a bit tricky and should be done fairly quickly so the pasta does not cool off as the residual heat in the pasta is needed to cook the eggs. When the pasta is done, drain and reserve a ½ cup of the cooking liquid. Leave pasta in colander. Add all the contents of the skillet (onions, prosciutto, and olive oil) into the pot that pasta was boiled in, then add in the pasta and place over low heat. Toss to combine all ingredients and heat through for a few seconds. If the pasta appears too dry add some EVOO and heat through.

Remove pot from the heat and slowly add the egg mixture to the pot stirring quickly until the eggs are incorporated into the pasta (stir quickly to prevent the eggs from scrambling . . . some actually prefer to let the eggs scramble a bit). Add about half of the grated cheeses and toss some more. If the sauce seems too thick, thin it out with some EVOO or some of the reserved water.

Season liberally with freshly cracked black pepper and additional grated cheese to taste.

Made a decent carbonara for dinner tonight. I use cream, bacon, egg, and a crap ton of garlic. No onion or peas. We had parmesan on hand, though I prefer to use romano it's not always available.

 

For about a pound of pasta, I cut up up to a pound of bacon (250-330 grams is a typical size package, but it's tough to have too much bacon in anything) into small pieces and fry it up. Mix 6-8 oz cooking cream in a bowl with enough shredded/grated cheese to make it thick. When the bacon is almost crispy* add 6-7 cloves of finely minced garlic, cook it a bit until the gralic starts to change color. At the cream & cheese mix right into the pan with the bacon and fat*, stir until the cheese melts into a sauce. Throw the cooked spaghetti in and toss it to cover it well with the sauce. Dig deep to stir up the bacon, tends to clump on the bottom. Add 3-4 beaten eggs and keep tossing and mixing until the eggs dry up a bit and it looks less wet. Sprinkle with some more parm/romano right before serving.

It doesn't seem to need any extra salt or pepper.

* IMPORTANT - American ("streaky") bacon is a bit fatty for this. If you are using American bacon, you'll probably want to drain off some of the grease (but not all, you want some in the sauce). Most of the bacon we've used over the last few years has been leaner center cut or rasher bacon, or if you're fortunate enough to be in a French country, "Lardons", none of which produce anywhere near the grease American style bacon does. It can make it too greasy if you don't pour a bit off.

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I also did a good chicken piccata this month. Also simple but good. You'll need a couple of chicken breasts, flour, butter, lemon juice, white wine and capers.

I prefer to mash chicken breasts with my hand on a cutting board and slice them horizontally in thin slices over pounding it thin. WAY thinner than the slices in that link BTW. You need a sharp knife and a careful hand, but if you do it right it's very thin and fork-tender. And you can't over-pound it and make holes, it takes less time, and doesn't splatter chicken bits all over the place.

Slice (or pound thin if you must...) pieces of chicken breast. Flour lightly, shake off the extra flour. In a hot pan, melt butter and brown up the breast cutlets. Put a plate in the oven, and put the oven on warm. It's going to take a few rounds of browning to do all the chicken, so stack the pieces up on the hot pan in the oven while you do them all. You may need to add more butter to the pan between batches.

When the chicken is done, add about 1/3 cup of lemon juice and 1/3 cup dry white wine to the hot pan. Also pour in the dripping and collected juices from the chicken plate. Cook the sauce a couple of minutes, while stirring and scraping the sides of the pan to get all the stuff into the sauce. Add capers to the sauce, and dump the sauce and capers all over the plate full of still-hot chicken.

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12 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

I also did a good chicken piccata this month. Also simple but good. You'll need a couple of chicken breasts, flour, butter, lemon juice, white wine and capers.

I prefer to mash chicken breasts with my hand on a cutting board and slice them horizontally in thin slices over pounding it thin. WAY thinner than the slices in that link BTW. You need a sharp knife and a careful hand, but if you do it right it's very thin and fork-tender. And you can't over-pound it and make holes, it takes less time, and doesn't splatter chicken bits all over the place.

Slice (or pound thin if you must...) pieces of chicken breast. Flour lightly, shake off the extra flour. In a hot pan, melt butter and brown up the breast cutlets. Put a plate in the oven, and put the oven on warm. It's going to take a few rounds of browning to do all the chicken, so stack the pieces up on the hot pan in the oven while you do them all. You may need to add more butter to the pan between batches.

When the chicken is done, add about 1/3 cup of lemon juice and 1/3 cup dry white wine to the hot pan. Also pour in the dripping and collected juices from the chicken plate. Cook the sauce a couple of minutes, while stirring and scraping the sides of the pan to get all the stuff into the sauce. Add capers to the sauce, and dump the sauce and capers all over the plate full of still-hot chicken.

I love a good Chicken Piccata

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I made a meatloaf in an Instant Pot this weekend. Very bland. I can't imagine why it had such good reviews.  Oh well, back to the drawing board.

Has anybody found any good instant pot recipes?

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14 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

I also did a good chicken piccata this month. Also simple but good. You'll need a couple of chicken breasts, flour, butter, lemon juice, white wine and capers.

I prefer to mash chicken breasts with my hand on a cutting board and slice them horizontally in thin slices over pounding it thin. WAY thinner than the slices in that link BTW. You need a sharp knife and a careful hand, but if you do it right it's very thin and fork-tender. And you can't over-pound it and make holes, it takes less time, and doesn't splatter chicken bits all over the place.

Slice (or pound thin if you must...) pieces of chicken breast. Flour lightly, shake off the extra flour. In a hot pan, melt butter and brown up the breast cutlets. Put a plate in the oven, and put the oven on warm. It's going to take a few rounds of browning to do all the chicken, so stack the pieces up on the hot pan in the oven while you do them all. You may need to add more butter to the pan between batches.

When the chicken is done, add about 1/3 cup of lemon juice and 1/3 cup dry white wine to the hot pan. Also pour in the dripping and collected juices from the chicken plate. Cook the sauce a couple of minutes, while stirring and scraping the sides of the pan to get all the stuff into the sauce. Add capers to the sauce, and dump the sauce and capers all over the plate full of still-hot chicken.

I like the cut vs pounded every time, particularly with a big chook.

Instead of just flour, try a 3-way mix.  Flour them, then dip them in a beaten egg/water mix, and then into panko (Trader Joes have it) seasoned with garlic powder.  

Then do exactly as you say.  

Mmmmm....

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12 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I like the cut vs pounded every time, particularly with a big chook.

Instead of just flour, try a 3-way mix.  Flour them, then dip them in a beaten egg/water mix, and then into panko (Trader Joes have it) seasoned with garlic powder.  

Then do exactly as you say.  

Mmmmm....

A bound breading seems like an entirely different thing than a simple flour and saute, and the garlic would change it. Probably good, too.

We do bound breading for some things (e.g. chicken parm), though don't generally use panko crumbs.

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Spicy Chicken Thai Style

55f0fb96c02a8.jpg

Assorted Mushrooms Risotto

53a30eaa03ff0.jpg

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4 hours ago, Jean123 said:

This looks healthy and delicious. :)

Just like me , it is!!!!!

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I've been into omelettes lately. Farm fresh eggs, melting cheese like chihuahua cheese, baby portabellas, Canadian bacon and sweet onion. And butter.

Start by heating an iron skillet on medium low. Melt the butter (use good salted butter).

Throw the onions in and before they turn translucent, throw in the mushrooms. After a bit, you can add a little red wine if you like and deglaze it as you throw in the Canadian bacon.

Put that shit to the side when mostly cooked and add more butter to the pan. I should have said that while all of this is happening, you should be whisking your eggs.

Once your fluffy omelette is setting, put in the cheese, onions,Canadian bacon and mushrooms. Fold and finish.

Yum.

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Did a great mushroom barley soup from America's Test Kitchen cookbook. I love their recipes because they are well tested and easy to repeat. 

While I generally prefer some meat in my soup this one has enough stuff to chew on that it almost seems like meat.

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14 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Searved with rice kripsey treatte?

No, but good idea!

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Don't forget to add a loaf of Portuguese bread to the table.

Portuguese Bread.jpg

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1 hour ago, QBF said:

Don't forget to add a loaf of Portuguese bread to the table.

Portuguese Bread.jpg

How can you tell it's Portuguese? Does it smell like stewed Whelk or something?

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8 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

How can you tell it's Portuguese? Does it smell like stewed Whelk or something?

Because I made it. My family comes from the Azores, and I used an old Portuguese recipe when I made it.

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2 minutes ago, QBF said:

Because I made it. My family comes from the Azores, and I used an old Portuguese recipe when I made it.

Plesae sharre it, I licke to backe alle kindes diffrent breades.                                      :)            

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1 hour ago, QBF said:

Because I made it. My family comes from the Azores, and I used an old Portuguese recipe when I made it.

AH! I thought maybe it had an accent that tipped you off....;)

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23 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Plesae sharre it, I licke to backe alle kindes diffrent breades.                                      :)            

 The present day, I am busy maketh kale soup, so i'll posteth t sometime lief.

In the meantime, taketh a behold at this thread in the cruising anarchy f'rum.  Th're art usually lots of food posts in CA.

 

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5 minutes ago, chinabald said:

Made this one today. Used bacone as suggested. It was a home run. 

Thanks for the suggestion. 

Glad you licked it!!!                                  :)

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On ‎2‎/‎20‎/‎2019 at 9:03 AM, QBF said:

Because I made it. My family comes from the Azores, and I used an old Portuguese recipe when I made it.

Going to macke papo secos thisse weekende with asparagus soupe.                                :)

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On 2/20/2019 at 8:07 AM, Snaggletooth said:

Plesae sharre it, I licke to backe alle kindes diffrent breades.                                      :)            

OK Snags, here is a Portuguese bread recipe I halved as the full recipe makes way too much for one or two people. This is from one of the books by Ana Patuleia Ortins http://portuguesecooking.com. Ana has more "Continental" Portuguese recipes, but she does include some recipes from the Azores.

Notes:

* I have not yet tried this halved recipe so you might need to make some "adjustments" as you go along.

* Also, take note of my warning that you should not knead the bread again after the last raise. If you do, you will ruin the bread!

* Kneading the bread by hand is a LOT of work! I know because that is how I do it. A counter mixer with a dough hook is much, much preferred.

As Bud Abbott stated: "I bake the bread, because I knead the dough!"

Portuguese Home-style Bread - Half Recipe.pdf

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2 hours ago, QBF said:

Kneading the bread by hand is a LOT of work! I know because that is how I do it.

Me to!

Thack you.                           :)

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2 hours ago, QBF said:

OK Snags, here is a Portuguese bread recipe I halved as the full recipe makes way too much for one or two people. This is from one of the books by Ana Patuleia Ortins http://portuguesecooking.com. Ana has more "Continental" Portuguese recipes, but she does include some recipes from the Azores.

Notes:

* I have not yet tried this halved recipe so you might need to make some "adjustments" as you go along.

* Also, take note of my warning that you should not knead the bread again after the last raise. If you do, you will ruin the bread!

* Kneading the bread by hand is a LOT of work! I know because that is how I do it. A counter mixer with a dough hook is much, much preferred.

As Bud Abbott stated: "I bake the bread, because I knead the dough!"

Portuguese Home-style Bread - Half Recipe.pdf

Link "Not available".

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6 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Link "Not available".

PDF's don't work with this BBS. It will have to be posted to an outside site and linked.

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23 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

PDF's don't work with this BBS. It will have to be posted to an outside site and linked.

I think it possibly varies somehow, I beleive I have posted PDF's in the past with no complaints.  I've been able to access the PDF from both my iPad and my lappy. Looking at Snags recent comment he didn't say he couldn't access the PDF.

Oh well...

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26 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

PDF's don't work with this BBS. It will have to be posted to an outside site and linked.

 

33 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Link "Not available".

Here is the recipe converted to a Word doc. If this doesn't work I'll paste it into a text file.

Portuguese Home-style Bread - Half Recipe.docx

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This attachment is not available. It may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it to this location.

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I have a pretty good rustic bread recipe, but I always like to try new ones. It's very hard to find decent bread in cow country..... They consider "Arnold's 7 grain" to be "Artisan" bread.....

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Not kidding..... Last summer while I spent 6 weeks in the hosp/ physical rehab place, I'd ask for whole wheat toast.... They'd bring me white. I'd say "I asked for whole wheat" and they'd say "This is all wheat".... It took at least 2 weeks before they figured out what I meant.... "Oh! You want that brown bread!".... Even then, on weekends I got barely warmed up white bread which had so much sugar in it I could feel my blood pressure rise, and the bacon was so salty that it made my mouth turn inside out.....

 So much for healthy food in a healthcare facility.....

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49 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:
This attachment is not available. It may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it to this location.

One last try with a text file

Portuguese Home-style Bread - Half Recipe.txt

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"Every society is three meals away from chaos - 'Vladimir Lenin 
 
Let's get a move on with that recipie please, things are getting a little edgy here.
 
Thanks
 

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OK, here's a favorite, loosely based on and adapted from a dish I loved in Liguria in the late 70s.

Linguini all' aglio, olio, gamberi e limone

Cook linguini in the normal way with a bit more salt than usual.  While the water's coming to the boil, rinse 7 to 10 large thawed prawns per person, and drain.  I like them tail-on, but picky eaters might like the tail off.  

After the pasta's been going 3 minutes or so, heat ¼ cup good olive oil in a large skillet (or two skillets if you're feeding more than three people) and when hot, drop three or four crushed garlic cloves in each skillet and stir.  Just as the garlic starts to cook, throw in the prawns.  Turn them over once after 2 minutes, and whiz them around a bit.  Finally pour in the juice of 1 large lemon per skillet (2 lemons per if they're Meyer lemons), sprinkle some red chili pepper flakes and turn down the heat till the sauce reduces a bit. Turn the prawns over a couple of times to coat them. 

Drain the pasta, dish up, and heap the prawny garlicy lemony mix over the top.  Finally sprinkle abundant finely-chopped fresh parsley.  Serve with a cold crisp white wine.

Don't forget the finger bowls and extra napkins if the prawns are tail-on.

Simple, and can be effective at times for loosening ladies' clothing afterwards. ^_^

 

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Linguine with Asparagus, Shrimp, and Scallions


Anchovy and asparagus may seem a little odd, but here the anchovy brings what bacon or pancetta would to the asparagus and shrimp: it underscores and brings up their flavors, but isn’t allowed to dominate.


Serves 4 as a main dish or 6 as a pasta course
1 pound asparagus, preferably fat-stemmed
2 bunches (about 2 dozen) slender scallions
1 ¼ pounds medium to large shrimp, peeled and deveined
Salt
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 large cloves garlic, lightly crushed, peeled, and minced
¼ to ½ teaspoon hot red pepper flakes, to taste
1 pound linguine
1 teaspoon anchovy paste or 2 small anchovy fillets packed in olive oil, patted dry and minced
2 tablespoons finely chopped flat leaf (Italian) parsley
1 tablespoon finely chopped oregano
1. Bring 4 quarts water to a rolling boil in 6-8 quart pot. Wash and trim cut end of asparagus. Peel tough parts of stems (lower third) with vegetable peeler. Cut off tips and set aside; cut stems in 1-inch lengths. Trim scallions and thinly cut on diagonal into 1-inch-long pieces, separating white and green parts. Cut shrimp into 2-3 pieces.
2. Stir in small handful salt and asparagus stem pieces into boiling water. Cook 1 minute and lift out with skimmer. Keep water simmering.
3. Put oil and garlic in large, heavy-bottomed skillet or frying pan over medium-high heat. Sauté until garlic is fragrant, about 5-10 seconds after it begins sizzling. Add hot pepper flakes to taste and white parts of scallions and toss until scallion is translucent and garlic is barely beginning to color, about 30 seconds. Turn off heat.
4. Stir linguine into boiling water. Cook, stirring occasionally, until al dente using package suggestions as rough guide. When pasta is almost done, reheat skillet over medium-low heat.
5. Add shrimp, anchovy, asparagus stems, and asparagus tips to pan, raise heat, and season with salt if needed. Tossing constantly, cook until shrimp are just curled and pink. Add herbs and scallion greens and turn off heat. Toss well.
6. Drain pasta, immediately toss with sauce and serve. This sauce should not be served with cheese.

NOTES:

i tend to double the amount of asparagus, i like rotini instead of linguine and, for the sea food averse,  you can substitute boneless/skinless chicken thighs (suitably cut up) for the shrimp

serve with a very chilled sauvignon blanc

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1 hour ago, P_Wop said:

OK, here's a favorite, loosely based on and adapted from a dish I loved in Liguria in the late 70s.

Linguini all' aglio, olio, gamberi e limone

Cook linguini in the normal way with a bit more salt than usual.  While the water's coming to the boil, rinse 7 to 10 large thawed prawns per person, and drain.  I like them tail-on, but picky eaters might like the tail off.  

After the pasta's been going 3 minutes or so, heat ¼ cup good olive oil in a large skillet (or two skillets if you're feeding more than three people) and when hot, drop three or four crushed garlic cloves in each skillet and stir.  Just as the garlic starts to cook, throw in the prawns.  Turn them over once after 2 minutes, and whiz them around a bit.  Finally pour in the juice of 1 large lemon per skillet (2 lemons per if they're Meyer lemons), sprinkle some red chili pepper flakes and turn down the heat till the sauce reduces a bit. Turn the prawns over a couple of times to coat them. 

Drain the pasta, dish up, and heap the prawny garlicy lemony mix over the top.  Finally sprinkle abundant finely-chopped fresh parsley.  Serve with a cold crisp white wine.

Don't forget the finger bowls and extra napkins if the prawns are tail-on.

Simple, and can be effective at times for loosening ladies' clothing afterwards. ^_^

 

"2 if they're Meyer lemons"?.... The Meyer lemons that I grow are 2-3 times the size of regular lemons.... As big as big Navel oranges or small Grapefruit.... And oh so sweet, you can almost eat them like an orange. They make excellent Limoncello too.

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6 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

"2 if they're Meyer lemons"?.... The Meyer lemons that I grow are 2-3 times the size of regular lemons.... As big as big Navel oranges or small Grapefruit.... And oh so sweet, you can almost eat them like an orange. They make excellent Limoncello too.

Where cane I by some?

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Ours make an excellent marmalade...this one is a ************ lemon and lime...

20190224_082538(1).jpg

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3 hours ago, hobot said:

"Every society is three meals away from chaos - 'Vladimir Lenin 
 
Let's get a move on with that recipie please, things are getting a little edgy here.
 
Thanks
 

Sorry, but it looks like it will not post to anyone. Maybe someone can contact the powers that be and fix it. 

As the recipe is three pages long it is too long to simply copy and paste.

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Fuck!...this place is like magic if you add an "s" to "Meyer"...:ph34r:

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56 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Where cane I by some?

I just picked and sent out the last of this year's harvest last week. (they were late) remind me around Christmas time, and I'll send you some.

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

remind me around Christmas time, and I'll send you some.

wille do!                                 :)

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1 hour ago, Grabbler said:

Fuck!...this place is like magic if you add an "s" to "Meyer"...:ph34r:

Yes, I tried that and got the x's too!  What a fustercluck.

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3 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

"2 if they're Meyer lemons"?.... The Meyer lemons that I grow are 2-3 times the size of regular lemons.... As big as big Navel oranges or small Grapefruit.... And oh so sweet, you can almost eat them like an orange. They make excellent Limoncello too.

The most common Meyer lemons here in the SF Bay Area are nearly all quite small, a bit smaller than the average lemon.  But sweet, and still quite lemony.  You might have a cultivar that's a cross between a Meyer and an orange.

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They are very lemony.... But huge and juicy. Some the size of softballs.

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I planted 3 zucchini plants in Spring, now nearing the end of Summer and they have yielded over 40kgs and still going strong. 

We have eaten them fried, stuffed, baked, steamed, you name it. They also do make a great (healthy) substitute for spaghetti but the highlight over the Xmas school holidays was making a Zucchini cake with my 7 year old daughter. 

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