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Canned Meat Anarchy

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

My Argentine wife routinely makes dulce de leche by gently boiling sealed cans of sweetened condensed milk for an hour. No explosions yet.

 

8 minutes ago, Bull City said:

You know I'm just kidding. BTW, I tried those pouches, but I was still hungry.

Dulce ce leche Chimbote is better than home made version. 

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On 2/21/2019 at 10:11 PM, Bull City said:

Vienna (pronounced "Vy-enna" in the South) Sausage is quite tasty.

vs.jpeg.05276315908f84b48b8485df27cc989a.jpeg

For CBH (Corned Beef Hash) Mary Kitchen is the go-to brand. Hmmm... I guess she was acquired by Hormel. Fry it until it gets a good crust. Mmmmm.

cbh.jpeg.440ba832d3fe3b2aa065b5ef0653ec00.jpeg

I am partial to Mary's Roast Beef Hash. Looks like dog food coming out of the can, but as you said, just fry until a bit crusty. Good stuff!

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On 2/21/2019 at 4:13 PM, Zonker said:

In Panama we got boil in the bag tamales for like 0.50 each years ago.

Plus one for anything you can boil for a few minutes in its own package underway and then serve (preferably, also in its own package).

Not a canned meat, and bit on the expensive side for major provisioning, but very convenient for when the crew doesn't feel like "cooking": http://tastybite.com

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6 hours ago, IStream said:

My Argentine wife routinely makes dulce de leche by gently boiling sealed cans of sweetened condensed milk for an hour. No explosions yet.

Please, for her health talk her out of this practice. She is getting a bPA dose from the plastic lining on the can. This is based on real science. It is a estrogen mimic to the hormonal system of women.

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5 hours ago, plenamar said:

 

Dulce ce leche Chimbote is better than home made version. 

And where do you buy it in the Seattle area?

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2 hours ago, rustylaru said:

Please, for her health talk her out of this practice. She is getting a bPA dose from the plastic lining on the can. This is based on real science. It is a estrogen mimic to the hormonal system of women.

Understood. And men. We make it about 2x/year and eat very little canned food in general, so I consider it an acceptable risk. 

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2 hours ago, thereefgeek said:

Plus one for anything you can boil for a few minutes in its own package underway and then serve (preferably, also in its own package).

Not a canned meat, and bit on the expensive side for major provisioning, but very convenient for when the crew doesn't feel like "cooking": http://tastybite.com

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I didn’t mention these since technically pouches are not cans, and some of them are veg - but these are great. Indian food is one of the few cuisines not damaged by reheating or jarring/canning. If your flying and they have an Indian veg meal as an option; take it! 

They also have precooked rice. 

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7 minutes ago, IStream said:

Understood. And men. We make it about 2x/year and eat very little canned food in general, so I consider it an acceptable risk. 

Bueno Onda

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23 hours ago, TBW said:

Hereford Corned Beef with potatoes, onions and garlic.  Instant Croissants in aluminum foil and percolated coffee on the shore side fire grill.  Mmmm. 

cornedbeef.png

1000 Islands?

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Thread Drift Warning.

My Mom married some weird dude from Kansas in 1995.

The first time my wife and I meet him was in about 98. He keep on talking about this thing called Y2K and how blaa blaa.

So they went as far down that rabbit hole as you can go. 2 shipping containers filled with home canned meats and beans, Seeds etc. Buried the whole lot under ground. All on credit cards because the banking system was going to collapse.

So if your ever in Nelson NZ and want to stock up on some canned meats, pop them a line. I'm told they still have 1 1/2 shipping containers full of canned meat.

True.

 

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7 hours ago, py26129 said:

1000 Islands?

Yes, Macdonald Island.  Not long distance cruising, but we don't have a fridge :)

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13 hours ago, Hike, Bitches! said:

I am partial to Mary's Roast Beef Hash. Looks like dog food coming out of the can, but as you said, just fry until a bit crusty. Good stuff!

I like to roast beef hash with apple sauce mixed in after the beef gets hot.

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10 hours ago, rustylaru said:

Thread Drift Warning.

My Mom married some weird dude from Kansas in 1995.

The first time my wife and I meet him was in about 98. He keep on talking about this thing called Y2K and how blaa blaa.

So they went as far down that rabbit hole as you can go. 2 shipping containers filled with home canned meats and beans, Seeds etc. Buried the whole lot under ground. All on credit cards because the banking system was going to collapse.

So if your ever in Nelson NZ and want to stock up on some canned meats, pop them a line. I'm told they still have 1 1/2 shipping containers full of canned meat.

True.

 

Huh! My family was in Nelson over the Christmas Holidays in 2001-2002. I could have gotten in on the ground floor! Dang!

Is your Mom still married to the weird dude?

Several years ago, I was flying back from Panama with my oldest son. I was on the aisle, he was in the middle, and some weird old dude was in the window seat. He started up a conversation with my son, and after a few minutes, I heard something about jet contrails, chemicals and the "gubmint" (government). I either read a book or pretended I was asleep for the rest of the flight. My son's head was spinning. I'm sure canned meat was covered somewhere.

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My understanding is that Spam is very popular in the South Pacific because the islanders formerly were cannibals, and Spam is the food that most closely approximates the taste of the traditional "long pig".

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

Huh! My family was in Nelson over the Christmas Holidays in 2001-2002. I could have gotten in on the ground floor! Dang!

Is your Mom still married to the weird dude?

Several years ago, I was flying back from Panama with my oldest son. I was on the aisle, he was in the middle, and some weird old dude was in the window seat. He started up a conversation with my son, and after a few minutes, I heard something about jet contrails, chemicals and the "gubmint" (government). I either read a book or pretended I was asleep for the rest of the flight. My son's head was spinning. I'm sure canned meat was covered somewhere.

Amazingly, they stayed together for about 15 years more. Always wanted to know what breakfast on 1/1/2000 felt like for them but didn't know them well enough to ask.

The mind that is drawn to conspiracy theory is a interesting study. Everyone needs to feel special some how. It's like owning a mutihull. <_<

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On 2/22/2019 at 11:50 AM, kinardly said:

Hereford corned beef hash is the bomb if you can find it. I used to keep a supply on the boat and bought it by the case from Smart & Final but they stopped carrying it. Then, for a couple of times I was able to order it from Amazon but now it just says not in stock, check back. I guess that means the Kiwis decided to keep it to themselves. :P But, seriously, if you're in a place where you can get it, load up and you won't be sorry. 

I saw this today at Costco in Seattle ,, was tempted to get it but with my BP, 880mg/serving of sodium is a bit over my limit. 

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6 hours ago, rustylaru said:

Amazingly, they stayed together for about 15 years more. Always wanted to know what breakfast on 1/1/2000 felt like for them but didn't know them well enough to ask.

The mind that is drawn to conspiracy theory is a interesting study. Everyone needs to feel special some how. It's like owning a mutihull. <_<

Thanks, Rusty.

When we went to NZ in 2001, it was because my two oldest boys, then 21 and 24, were there on some kind of temporary work visa. We like to surf and it was a wonderful family trip, which included my two younger children. On the way there, we had a long layover in LA international terminal, about eight hours.

We were sitting near another family, a bit younger than us, and it was an amazing coincidence. This guy was an MD in Texas and had gone to Duke Medical School. While there, he played on their club soccer team and we realized that we had played against each other in the local men's league. Anyhow, his parents had divorced, his mother had remarried to a Kiwi living in the US, he retired and they moved back to NZ.

From our conversation, it seemed that Kiwis travel "home" every few years to see family in Canada, U.S., U.K., but rarely do "family" come to NZ. This was his second trip to NZ to see Mom, and his first since he was married.

Lovely people and country. A retirement destination if there ever was one, but it's a long haul from N.C. 

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8 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

My understanding is that Spam is very popular in the South Pacific because the islanders formerly were cannibals, and Spam is the food that most closely approximates the taste of the traditional "long pig".

I think it's because GI's left tons of it their wake.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

I think it's because GI's left tons of it their wake.

Bingo. Same for Korea. Budae jjigae means army base stew. It’s US canned meats American cheese, chilies and ramen noodles. 

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On ‎2‎/‎21‎/‎2019 at 1:45 PM, Passport111 said:

This is a bit out of scope of what you are asking but you could always can your own meat. 

When I was deployed in the military my dad would can venison and chicken and send it to me.  Absolutely delicious, you know exactly what it is, and you can season it a variety of ways just the way you like it.   

When I would get a care package we would find some instant potatoes and a camping cooker and feast like kings.

It's always odd to me when I hear someone say MREs are good.  Ok, but given the choice... I guess I can thank them for me not being a picky eater. However, do not make a meal plan of them unless you either plan to either burn ~10K calories a day or don't mind putting on several  pounds.  Or if you enjoy regularity without pharmaceutical assistance.

During the First Persian Excursion, 1990's edition, I traded for a bunch of T Rats (beef and chicken chunks) and hit up a local convenience store in the middle of East Bumfuck,  Buddha, for a bunch of bags of spices and beans and a huge (3 or 4 gallon) stew pot.  Later we traded MREs to the Beddos for tomatoes, garlic and onions, and I kept a chili going that we'd warm on a diesel stove or the back deck of an M-1, adding T Rat or MRE meat or locally obtained stuff like goat or camel to it.  We'd bungie the top down and stow it in the Hummer for movement and whip it out, feed whoever was nearby.  It was a thing through the cold winter months and into late spring, and during the 4 days or so of non-stop two way rifle range activity, that chili picked up more soldiers than a Columbus, GA stripper.  Left them with a similar burning feeling in their nether regions, too. 

The effect of really good hot chow on the morale and energy level of the gun bunnies my team rolled with amazed me.  The efforts at Natick to make MRE's taste better probably has higher return on investment than almost any other DoD program. 

 

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In the UAE, we'd reheat shawarmas on the aluminum wheelhouse roof of our little gunboats.

With a typical midday temperature of 115-125F, the metal roof got plenty warm enough to cook food. Shawarmas, ramen, MRE's, whatever.  The wheelhouse was not air-conditioned and they were open in the back, so the cabin was a literal oven. We took turns driving so that the driver wouldn't roast alive. We did have a guy pass out once. 

We routinely took the boats out in conditions that exceeded their intended capability. As a result, we twisted the hulls to the point where the side wheelhouse windows literally popped out of their frames and were lost overboard. This at least added some cross ventilation to the wheelhouse. We didn't replace them.

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You know back in the day...sailing ships were provisioned with livestock....

I suppose those new maxi's water toy hold could be converted into a stable for a few steers, a pig or two and some chickens...forget the JetSkis...

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Is there equipment available for canning your own meals in actual tin cans (as opposed to glass jars)?  Or even better canning your own meals in foil pouches?  That would be perfect for long voyages. 

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53 minutes ago, Foolish said:

Is there equipment available for canning your own meals in actual tin cans (as opposed to glass jars)?  Or even better canning your own meals in foil pouches?  That would be perfect for long voyages. 

That is scary. There are too many ways to mess up—- and not know you needed up until you are in the middle of nowhere 

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49 minutes ago, Foolish said:

Is there equipment available for canning your own meals in actual tin cans (as opposed to glass jars)?  Or even better canning your own meals in foil pouches?  That would be perfect for long voyages. 

Our fine Mormon friends have a whole industry around home canning and food preservation as preparedness is important to that community. There is many options out there.

Trouble with storing food in metals is the wrong pH balance can leed to all sorts of problems. Botulism use to spread this way. Hence plastic lined tin cans that we see today.

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On 2/24/2019 at 6:40 AM, TBW said:

Yes, Macdonald Island.  Not long distance cruising, but we don't have a fridge :)

Very cool.  I thought that BBQ looked familiar. Any day out on the water, or in the Islands is a good day!!

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20 hours ago, Henley Hornbrook said:

I saw this today at Costco in Seattle ,, was tempted to get it but with my BP, 880mg/serving of sodium is a bit over my limit. 

Hey, I never said it was healthy! Just goes down great, especially the morning after standing watches all night. Fry two cans worth in a big skillet until crusty on both sides, pour off at least five tablespoons of highly saturated fat, crack a dozen eggs into the center, reduce heat, cover until the eggs poach, serve. 

Not something you can make a regular diet out of but once in awhile............the stuff is to die for (almost literally). 

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Tasty stuff, and probably healthier than a lot of the products mentioned above. Bit costy though at around 10-11 USD per can:

Grant's Premium Haggis 392g

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Brown lean ground beef in a skillet. Drain excess fat and put the beef in canning jars. Add a little water to within 1/2” of the top. Gently screw down lids and boil for ten minutes. Done, lasts forever. Next, go feed the fish with the little dog wieners, spam, other nastys etc. Re-use the jars or use them as your personal artificial reef until they return back to sand a thousand years from now. 

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48 minutes ago, ecsimonson said:

They played for my dad years ago in Salida

Where? That's pretty cool.

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13 hours ago, seabell said:

Tasty stuff, and probably healthier than a lot of the products mentioned above. Bit costy though at around 10-11 USD per can:

Grant's Premium Haggis 392g

Good God.  How is that healthier?

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I though haggis was illegal in the USA on account of strange ingredients like sheep's lungs.   Good haggis is scrummy when fried, not so good boiled.

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3 hours ago, Whinging Pom said:

I though haggis was illegal in the USA on account of strange ingredients like sheep's lungs.   Good haggis is scrummy when fried, not so good boiled.

Maybe so, but that's your problem! Never did the Scots any harm.

Seriously though, it's perfectly legal once properly canned. Have you ever considered the 'strange' ingredients that comprise MRMs (mechanically reclaimed meat) like vienna sausages or Spam? Nothing's wasted. If you want to give haggis a try, there are non-offal-based versions around.

How about a spot of breakfast:

Rose Pork Brains with Milk Gravy 5 Ounce Cans (4 Cans Per Pack)

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

Good God.  How is that healthier?

What part would you consider unhealthy? Rest assured, only non-smoking lambs are accepted for incorporation.

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6 minutes ago, seabell said:

Maybe so, but that's your problem! Never did the Scots any harm.

Seriously though, it's perfectly legal once properly canned. Have you ever considered the 'strange' ingredients that comprise MRMs (mechanically reclaimed meat) like vienna sausages or Spam? Nothing's wasted. If you want to give haggis a try, there are non-offal-based versions around.

How about a spot of breakfast:

Rose Pork Brains with Milk Gravy 5 Ounce Cans (4 Cans Per Pack)

The kosher certification stamp must be on the back.

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Back in the 60's when we started having our own animals butchered, there was a bit of a horror show inside some of the neatly wrapped parcels that we received back.  And a bit of a learning curve.  The magic phrase is, "just grind all of that stuff into the hamburger and sausage!"  

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50 minutes ago, ecsimonson said:

The Victoria tavern, I believe they also played for my uncle in Dallas years before that.

That would make sense, the Vic has been around a long time.

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4 minutes ago, Term Limits! said:

Smeak?

I think that's just a little too close to Smeg. I don't want to cook on it, and I sure as hell don't want to cook with it.

 

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On 2/23/2019 at 2:58 AM, Zonker said:

BACON:

...

I ridiculed my wife at the time for buying it but it proved a very smart move.

https://www.amazon.com/Kirkland-Signature-Bacon-Crumbs-20-oz/dp/B0027EL85S

91x8GtOr+CL._SY679_.jpg

These things kick ass. Not costly at all - something like 9 bucks for 20oz., and the vast majority of the fat is cooked out already so it's kind of like being half price. Given that room-temperature fresh eggs have a pretty long shelf life as well, we can keep a good run of breakfast scrambles going for a month.

Rehydrate dried onions and wild mushrooms (Costco as well) to take it up a notch. Freeze-dried cartons of hash brown potatoes that rehydrate in like 10 minutes help too. Sundried tomatoes. Pasta, quinoa, tinned sardines, tuna, chicken, beef. Sealed bags of tortillas. Hot sauces. Really good powdered mashed potatoes. Cheese is a hurdle.

Every now and then they even feature giant packs of Mountain House freeze-dried backpacking foods; pretty tasty as well.

UHT milk cartons, freeze-dried fruits. Sealed dried fruits. Jerky. Nuts. Dried seafood/soups/weird stuff from the Japanese market, in the absence of fishing luck. 

Euro fruit juice concentrates. Overproof rum. Seltzer water maker, or we just lug along our Sodastream cheapo gaserator - cylinder good for a month. Itching to try one of the low-wattage ice cube makers. Time to plan an outing!

Webb Chiles has done a ton of taste-testing of freeze-dried foods on his site. Think it's inthepresentsea.com

 

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On 2/23/2019 at 8:38 PM, thereefgeek said:

Plus one for anything you can boil for a few minutes in its own package underway and then serve (preferably, also in its own package).

Not a canned meat, and bit on the expensive side for major provisioning, but very convenient for when the crew doesn't feel like "cooking": http://tastybite.com

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I take one of these and combine it with the contents of a box of macaroni and cheese. Its incredibly good.  The channa masala takes the place of milk and butter that you would ordinarily add to the Mac and cheese.  Annies cheddar is usually what I use.  Add a little broccoli to the pasta a few minutes before its done cooking for added points.  To keep this thread on topic, a can of chicken would also work for the combination. 

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14 hours ago, rattus32 said:

 

Euro fruit juice concentrates. Overproof rum. Seltzer water maker, or we just lug along our Sodastream cheapo gaserator - cylinder good for a month. Itching to try one of the low-wattage ice cube makers. Time to plan an outing!

 

The soda stream really reduces having to haul around cans of soda. 

Take an old wine bottle and each time you have some canned fruit, pour the excess juice in with your ovenproofed rhum. It’s quite a good cocktail base with some angostura bitters and ice. 

 

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On 2/26/2019 at 1:45 PM, bmiller said:

That would make sense, the Vic has been around a long time.

My dad has been the caretaker/owner since 1982.  This song is about my uncles bar Mother Blues. I have some great pics but mostly stories from dad and uncle.

 

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On 2/25/2019 at 12:04 PM, Foolish said:

Is there equipment available for canning your own meals in actual tin cans (as opposed to glass jars)?  Or even better canning your own meals in foil pouches?  That would be perfect for long voyages. 

In the 80's I took an outdoor course in Alaska.  Along with other things we caught salmon in the streams and canned them in small metal cans with crimped metal lids.  Good for a long time.  https://wellscan.ca/

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On ‎2‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 12:33 AM, seabell said:

Tasty stuff, and probably healthier than a lot of the products mentioned above. Bit costy though at around 10-11 USD per can:

Grant's Premium Haggis 392g

I prefer my Haggis freshly Shot,, having first had it for school meals (mind you I was in Inverness)

See the source image

 

A near by butchers exports haggis

haggis[1].jpg

 

to

 

 

Scotland....

 

PS real haggis has only been allowed to imported into canada since 2017

it was banned in the USA since 1971, but I believe has recently been permitted..

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Norfolk Haggis? Probably shot by Phil the Greek or maybe even by Liz herself.... does it say 'by royal appointment' on the bag?

 

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Alligator, yes. I've had it. The tail is quite good.

Kangaroo?  Maybe...if someone could vouch for it.

Snake? Nope. Pass the veggies, please.

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21 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Alligator, yes. I've had it. The tail is quite good.

Kangaroo?  Maybe...if someone could vouch for it.

Snake? Nope. Pass the veggies, please.

I've had Kangaroo steak. To me, it tasted like rancid liver. 

There is a reason people don't hear about "RooBurger" chains in Australia.

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11 minutes ago, SemiSalt said:

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Worse, mock turtle soup. It's made with brains and other undesirable parts:

worthmore_mock__99193.1538519680.jpg.d542194466e4a884b9bf456008375a5d.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, QBF said:

Gator.jpg

Kangaroo.jpg

Snake.jpg

I wonder what the "etc." is in the snake soup. I normally don't like to ingest "etc."
Jim

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23 minutes ago, woahboy said:

I wonder what the "etc." is in the snake soup. I normally don't like to ingest "etc."
Jim

It's made in China, probably has melamine in it. Makes your skin nice and glossy.

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Kind of like those xxxxxxx-Surprise meals Mum would make. 

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8 hours ago, Ajax said:

Worse, mock turtle soup. It's made with brains and other undesirable parts:

worthmore_mock__99193.1538519680.jpg.d542194466e4a884b9bf456008375a5d.jpg

 

The history is was that when an acquaintance learned my daughter was going to a college in the Philadelphia area he gave her a can of snapping turtle soup (different brand) on the grounds that it's a Philly specialty. It was still on our shelf a couple years later when I opened it and declared it disgusting.

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On 2/22/2019 at 1:42 PM, Elegua said:

That's what makes it taste so good. 

A butcher was one of the many jobs my grandfather had.  He lived in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country, so scrapple was one of the things he made. He described the process to me when I was a boy. Scrapple started from a meat product called "pudding".  Pudding was made from the last tidbits of edible food left from a pig carcass.  Bones with tiny bits of meat still clinging to them, the entire head, including brains IIRC, and any other edible bits and scraps were put in a big pot and boiled until everything was completely falling apart.  The resulting semi-solid mush was pushed through a sieve to remove any bits of bone, and pudding was the result. Mix cornmeal and pudding in boiling water and you get scrapple.  Once cool, it sets up as a solid cake, and can be reheated as a hot-cereal-like mush, or it can be fried.  By the time I was a boy, the very high cholesterol content of pudding and scrapple was out of vogue, so it was a rare treat to have either. Pudding was very good heated and spread on toast, and much better than vegemite in that regard; but I didn't grow up with vegemite.

People like my grandfather used to make use of every bit of nutrition available from a butchered animal.  It sounds gross to us today, but they made some extremely tasty food with these last remnants.

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Two of my favorite backpacking foods from 1960's boy scout days were kippered snacks mentioned above and a concoction of 1/2" cubed spam mixed in with mashed potato from dehydrated flakes, (now Rimas approved) and brown gravy made from a dehydrated packet.   I'm not sure how it would taste on an ocean passage but it sure hit the spot after a long hot day on the trail.

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Wow, who knew some of these concoctions existed.

I think we will stick to destinations inside our freezer zone.

That said, Croc tail, Roo fillet and Snake are all very nice on a BBQ, in a can??????

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21 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It's made in China, probably has melamine in it. Makes your skin nice and glossy.

And non-stick.

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Those are delicacies (the foie gras, not the horsemeat). I'll be they're tasty with good biscuits.

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42 minutes ago, Son of a Sailor said:

The there is this . . . i don't think its for me. Canned true nomadic stewed horse meat from Kazakhstan

image.png.924747a023c9b4dd4b3bfadfe8bf3fc6.png

I've tried horse meat in Japan on a couple of occasions. It was served like carpaccio both times and it was tasty. I'm not sure the canned Kazakh version would make it over the bar.

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Ever hear of souse? I think it's another example of the Pennsylvania Dutch ability to wring every last calorie from discarded scraps. Boiled pig heads and other parts pickled in vinegar and suspended in chilled gelatin. My grandfather was of German descent via eastern Ohio where I guess it was considered a delicacy. My Mom also loved the stuff. If you're ever offered a taste, RUN!

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4 hours ago, kinardly said:

Ever hear of souse? I think it's another example of the Pennsylvania Dutch ability to wring every last calorie from discarded scraps. Boiled pig heads and other parts pickled in vinegar and suspended in chilled gelatin. My grandfather was of German descent via eastern Ohio where I guess it was considered a delicacy. My Mom also loved the stuff. If you're ever offered a taste, RUN!

My Dad loved the stuff but he called it head cheese. Never had it myself, though.

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This whole thread reminds me of a delivery , about 12 years ago.  Dinner at the beginning of night 3 consisted of "Christmas dinner in a can",  eaten straight form the can, which, in a nod to civilized life,  the owner had warmed up in a bath of hot water.  I remember my buddy asking me what the little green things were in his dinner.  My answer was:  "Shut up and eat.  Must be peas".

 

This is an approximation what I think we ate

Image result for christmas dinner in a tin

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5 hours ago, py26129 said:

This whole thread reminds me of a delivery , about 12 years ago.  Dinner at the beginning of night 3 consisted of "Christmas dinner in a can",  eaten straight form the can, which, in a nod to civilized life,  the owner had warmed up in a bath of hot water.  I remember my buddy asking me what the little green things were in his dinner.  My answer was:  "Shut up and eat.  Must be peas".

 

This is an approximation what I think we ate

Image result for christmas dinner in a tin

Brilliant!

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18 hours ago, py26129 said:

This whole thread reminds me of a delivery , about 12 years ago.  Dinner at the beginning of night 3 consisted of "Christmas dinner in a can",  eaten straight form the can, which, in a nod to civilized life,  the owner had warmed up in a bath of hot water.  I remember my buddy asking me what the little green things were in his dinner.  My answer was:  "Shut up and eat.  Must be peas".

 

This is an approximation what I think we ate

Image result for christmas dinner in a tin

Oh. My. God.  I don't know whether to be amazed or disgusted.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Oh. My. God.  I don't know whether to be amazed or disgusted.

Both. And curious and hungry. I'd hit that in a second.

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5 hours ago, IStream said:

Both. And curious and hungry. I'd hit that in a second.

I know, right?

What a wierd mix of feelings.

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FWIW, the is a YouTube site called TheWolfePit that features taste tests of lots of sketchy food, some of which is canned. Examples:bacon cheeseburger in a can, bacon in a can.

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20 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

FWIW, the is a YouTube site called TheWolfePit that features taste tests of lots of sketchy food, some of which is canned. Examples:bacon cheeseburger in a can, bacon in a can.

We used to use bacon in a can, not bad if you find the right brand. I think we used a Danish brand. My grandfather was a master mariner going back to the days the end of sail. No refrigeration in those days most stuff was canned. And Gramp's was a Welchman and curried everything so it would last a bit more. As a kid, my Gramps lived in a downstairs in an in-law apartment after his wife had passed away. The whole house would permeate curry for days. I'm a spice guy but I can't take curry to this day. And I'll eat/try just about anything. Curry - it's out. Too bad really. 

Bacon in a can and it was like that:   

Canned bacon.jpg

And this:

 

Tactical bacon.jpg

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4 hours ago, Maxx Baqustae said:

We used to use bacon in a can, not bad if you find the right brand. I think we used a Danish brand. My grandfather was a master mariner going back to the days the end of sail. No refrigeration in those days most stuff was canned. And Gramp's was a Welchman and curried everything so it would last a bit more. As a kid, my Gramps lived in a downstairs in an in-law apartment after his wife had passed away. The whole house would permeate curry for days. I'm a spice guy but I can't take curry to this day. And I'll eat/try just about anything. Curry - it's out. Too bad really. 

Bacon in a can and it was like that:   

Canned bacon.jpg

And this:

 

Tactical bacon.jpg

Tactical bacon..... Is it weaponized? ( Sorry, couldn’t resist). Good story about your grandfather.

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3 minutes ago, woahboy said:

Tactical bacon..... Is it weaponized? ( Sorry, couldn’t resist). Good story about your grandfather.

Ya, I couldn't resist myself; it just popped up on a Google search and I had to laugh. I found the Danish brand bacon "Tulip".  Like the Celebrity brand above it was wrapped up with some kind of wax paper. Not gross like some canned stuff with gelatin in the can. I have a full top loading fridge and freezer on my 38 so I don't need canned stuff but if I didn't I think it was more than acceptable from my young experience. Gramps was a crusty curmudgeon but he did teach me by example. But curry? No thanks.